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I can't seem to figure out the purpose of the flag -nostartfiles. It prevents main() from being called immediately, and typically you'd also specify the program entry point. However, why would I want to do that? I have written a kernel that required it, since everything was up to me to get started, but other than that, is there a non-OS reason to specify a different program entry point?

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    "I have written a kernel that required it, since everything was up to me to get started" - you answered your own question. – yugr Mar 27 '17 at 15:10
  • Well, yes. What I meant was, is there any reason other than kernel writing (see the last part of the question). If not, then I guess I do understand it better than I thought :-P – Michael Stachowsky Mar 27 '17 at 15:16
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    Microcontrollers, using the compiler as a cross compiler and preventing libraries from being used since there is no operating system to back them. – old_timer Mar 27 '17 at 19:08
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You'd use -nostartfiles (and -nostdlib) when you do not want any standard libraries (like libc and libgcc) to be linked in and standard initialization actions, like calling C++ constructors, to be run. Typical use-cases are writing system software like kernels or firmwares.

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