39

I'm trying to get the results from a mock backend in Angular 2 for unit testing. Currently, we are using fakeAsync with a timeout to simulate the passing of time.

current working unit test

it('timeout (fakeAsync/tick)', fakeAsync(() => {
    counter.getTimeout();
    tick(3000); //manually specify the waiting time
}));

But, this means that we are limited to a manually defined timeout. Not when the async task is completed. What I'm trying to do is getting tick() to wait until the task is completed before continuing with the test.

This does not seem to work as intended.

Reading up on the fakeAsync and tick the answer here explains that:

tick() simulates the asynchronous passage of time.

I set up a plnkr example simulating this scenario.

Here, we call the getTimeout() method which calls an internal async task that has a timeout. In the test, we try wrapping it and calling tick() after calling the getTimeout() method.

counter.ts

getTimeout() {
  setTimeout(() => {
    console.log('timeout')
  },3000)
}

counter.specs.ts

it('timeout (fakeAsync/tick)', fakeAsync(() => {
    counter.getTimeout();
    tick();
}));

But, the unit test fails with the error "Error: 1 timer(s) still in the queue."

Does the issue here in the angular repo have anything to do with this?

Is it possible to use tick() this way to wait for a timeout function? Or is there another approach that I can use?

2
  • 1
    I tried to solve this with a simple async/await helper. Unfortunately, while the tests pass and behave correctly, zone.js has a hissy fit, chokes and dies. One should be able to write a simple service test without all of this framework specific crap. Apr 10, 2017 at 1:27
  • can anyone look in to this stackoverflow.com/questions/63580184/…
    – Ram
    Aug 26, 2020 at 9:27

7 Answers 7

44

The purpose of fakeAsync is to control time within your spec. tick will not wait for any time as it is a synchronous function used to simulate the passage of time. If you want to wait until the asynchronous function is complete, you are going to need to use async and whenStable, however, in your example, the spec will take 3 seconds to pass so I wouldn't advise this.

The reason why the counter.spec.ts is failing is that you have only simulated the passage of 0 seconds (typically used to represent the next tick of the event loop). So when the spec completes, there are still mocked timers active and that fails the whole spec. It is actually working properly by informing you that a timeout has been mocked an is unhandled.

Basically, I think you are attempting to use fakeAsync and tick in ways for which they were not intended to be used. If you need to test a timeout the way that you have proposed, the simplest way would be to mock the setTimeout function yourself so that, regardless of the time used, you can just call the method.

EDITED I ran into a related issue where I wanted to clear the timers, and since it was not the part under test, I didn't care how long it took. I tried:

tick(Infinity);

Which worked, but was super hacky. I ended up going with

discardPeriodicTasks();

And all of my timers were cleared.

2
  • 8
    Tried everything, but discardPeriodicTasks() worked perfect
    – Drenai
    Aug 19, 2019 at 20:34
  • 1
    Just to save time for who is here, discardPeriodicTasks is in @angular/core/testing
    – aquilesb
    Feb 11, 2021 at 6:59
24

Try to add one or a combination of the following function calls to the end of your test:

    flush();
    flushMicrotasks();
    discardPeriodicTasks();
  1. flush (with optional maxTurns parameter) also flushes macrotasks. (This function is not mentionned in the Angular testing tutorial.)
  2. flushMicrotasks flushes the microtask queue.
  3. discardPeriodicTasks cancels "peridodic timer(s) still in the queue".

Timers in the queue do not necessarily mean that there's a problem with your code. For example, components that observe the current time may introduce such timers. If you use such components from a foreign library, you might also consider to stub them instead of "chasing timers".

For further understanding you may look at the javascript code of the fakeAsync function in zone-testing.js.

3
  • I had to use both flush() and disacrdPeriodicTasks() to do the trick. Wish I had some idea what the hell is going on but hey ho :-).
    – Samih
    Jan 7, 2021 at 15:38
  • Just got the case that a superfluous fakeAsync around my test caused it to fail with a "timer still in the queue". Removing the fakeAsync fixed the test. Jan 18, 2021 at 11:12
  • Sometimes a deep debugging session with the zone code can explain such a strange behaviour and reveal the pending tasks, but only if you have much time... Jan 18, 2021 at 11:19
15

At the end of each test add:

 fixture.destroy();
 flush();
1
  • 2
    It bring waiting tasks from 3 to 1. But one still is in queue. Apr 3, 2019 at 11:44
4

Try this:

// I had to do this:
it('timeout (fakeAsync/tick)', (done) => {
  fixture.whenStable().then(() => {
       counter.getTimeout();
       tick();
    done();
  });
});

Source

1

Async

test.service.ts

export class TestService {
  getTimeout() {
    setTimeout(() => { console.log("test") }, 3000);
  }
}

test.service.spec.ts

import { TestBed, async } from '@angular/core/testing';

describe("TestService", () => {
  let service: TestService;

  beforeEach(() => {
    TestBed.configureTestingModule({
      providers: [TestService],
    });

    service = TestBed.get(TestService);
  });

  it("timeout test", async(() => {
    service.getTimeout();
  });
});

Fake Async

test.service.ts

export class TestService {
  readonly WAIT_TIME = 3000;

  getTimeout() {
    setTimeout(() => { console.log("test") }, this.WAIT_TIME);
  }
}

test.service.spec.ts

import { TestBed, fakeAsync } from '@angular/core/testing';

describe("TestService", () => {
  let service: TestService;

  beforeEach(() => {
    TestBed.configureTestingModule({
      providers: [TestService],
    });

    service = TestBed.get(TestService);
  });

  it("timeout test", fakeAsync(() => {
    service.getTimeout();
    tick(service.WAIT_TIME + 10);
  });
});
0
0

I normally use the flushMicrotasks method in my unit tests for use with my services. I had read that tick() is very similar to flushMicrotasks but also calls the jasmine tick() method.

0

For me all above didnt helped, but a double call of tick(<async_time>) in my test code.

My explanation so far: for every async call you a need a single/own tick()-call.

I have a .pipe(debounceTime(500)) and a timer(500).subscribe(..) afterwards and this helped:

tick(500);
tick(500);

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