0

I'm puzzled in getting an icon to display around an <hr> tag in IE and Edge. I created a class to apply to apply to the hr, which displays fine in Firefox and Chrome, but I'm not sure how to get IE to behave.

How it should look: Normal (Firefox and Chrome).

But in IE and Edge, the icons are hidden from view. I thought they weren't displaying at all, but when I added longer content to the :before and :after I could see that the content is hidden behind the <hr>, as part of the text was visible below the line.

I tried overflow: visible but it stays the same, and adding padding pushed the icons below the hr. Any help greatly appreciated!

CSS:

hr.fancy {
  border: 0;
  width: 50%;
  border-top: 1px solid #E67E48;
  margin: 0 auto;
}

hr.fancy:after,
hr.fancy:before {
  content: '◆ test';
  position: relative;
  top: -11px;
  color: #111;
  font-size: 14px;
  color: #E67E48;
}

hr.fancy:before {
  float: left;
  right: 20px;
}

hr.fancy:after {
  float: right;
  left: 20px;
}

JS Fiddle

  • I am surprised it works at all in chrome & firefox... - :After and :Before are child pseudoelements... They need a parent - <br />, <hr /> are shortened elements without content, so child pseudoelements shouldn't be applied on them. – Adam K. Mar 28 '17 at 6:55
0

I guess i was wrong... It works with <hr/> element in IE, Edge

hr.fancy {
  position: relative;
  width: 50%;
  margin: 0 auto;
  display: block;
  border-top: 1px solid #E67E48;
  clear: both;
  overflow:visible;
}

hr.fancy:after,
hr.fancy:before {
  position: absolute;
  left: -20px;
  color: #E67E48;
  line-height: 0;
  font-size: 14px;
  content: '◆';
}

hr.fancy:after {
  left: auto;
  right: -20px;
}
<br>
<hr class="fancy" />

  • Ah, thank you! I was also surprised it was possible but this thread got me trying. Thanks for cleaning up what I'd done, it looks much better now. – Crista Mar 28 '17 at 19:17
  • @Crista you're welcome... your code worked (positioning was not solved the best way though) and for some reason only IE needed overflow visible to be explicitly defined. – Adam K. Mar 29 '17 at 5:41

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.