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I have an anonymous polling function which has a setTimeout to kick off a ajax call every 30 seconds. However, the anonymous function does kick off immediately but for some reason the ajax call does not kick off immediately, but starts only after the 30 seconds. Am I missing something like calling it immediately to trigger right away?

(function poll() {
        console.log('polling called');
        setTimeout(function () {
            $.ajax({
                url: "/server/call",
                type: 'GET',
                dataType: "json", 
                timeout: 30000,
                success: function (data) {
                    var currentdate = new Date();
                    var datetime = "Last Sync: " +                  currentdate.getDate() + "/" + (currentdate.getMonth() + 1) + "/"
                    + currentdate.getFullYear() + " @ "
                    + currentdate.getHours() + ":"
                    + currentdate.getMinutes() + ":"
                    + currentdate.getSeconds();

                    console.log(datetime);
                    console.log('call was successful at: ' + datetime);
                }
            });
        },
        30000);
    })();

The logging just starts off only after 30 seconds and not right away. Thanks

  • 3
    You're immediately scheduling it for 30 seconds from now. If you want it to run immediately, don't schedule it for 30 seconds from now with setTimeout...? Maybe what you want to do is have poll immediately make the call, and then delay future calls to poll by 30 seconds? – apsillers Mar 28 '17 at 14:40
  • Also, why do you want to trigger it right after your page just got refreshed? - I assume you don't trigger it by a click event... – Jeroen Bellemans Mar 28 '17 at 14:42
  • @apsillers So instead of setTimeout to poll immediately and how about how to set up future calls? – Lumpy Mar 28 '17 at 15:34
  • @JeroenBellemans The page loads and I want to detect what to display control wise, meaning if buttons or divs needs to be enabled or disabled. So on page load I want it to check and then keep checking until a status has changed based on the ajax call's response. – Lumpy Mar 28 '17 at 15:36
  • i mean... that's what setTimeout does. it waits. – Kevin B Mar 28 '17 at 18:54
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That is not remotely what setTimeout() does. setTimeout() calls its function, once, and only after the given time has expired.

setInterval() is close to what you want, but even that only calls the function the first time after the interval has expired once.

What you need is to do this:

const everyThree = () => 
            $.ajax({
                url: "/server/call",
                type: 'GET',
...
everyThree();
setInterval(everyThree, 3000);

If you don't like using setInterval(), you can do the same thing manually:

const everyThree = () => {
            setTimeout(everyThree, 3000); 
            $.ajax({
                url: "/server/call",
                type: 'GET',
...
everyThree();

If you suspect the AJAX call might run long, you could do the following:

const everyThree = () => 
            $.ajax({
                url: "/server/call",
                type: 'GET',
           ...
           })
           .always(() => setTimeout(everyThree, 3000)); 

everyThree();

This will make the next AJAX call 3 seconds after the previous one has succeeded, failed, or timed-out.

Edit:

If you don't have const or => ("fat-arrow") in your environment, your choices are

  1. Make do with var and function. They are inferior in many ways, but universally available.
  2. Use a transpiler like Babel and get all the advantages of a modern language (constants, easy anonymous functions, deconstruction, array-spreading), at the cost of a slight increase in complexity in your operational environment.
  • But from what I have been reading, it was not recommended to use setInterval since it can queue up lots of request, and the recommended way was to use anonymous setTimeout instead. – Lumpy Mar 28 '17 at 15:38
  • @Lumpy -- see edit. – Malvolio Mar 28 '17 at 18:53
  • Thanks, looks like it does the job, I'm just unfamiliar with the keyword const in javascript, but doing some reading on immutable variables (stackoverflow.com/questions/33040703/…) it would be just to do with scoping. – Lumpy Mar 29 '17 at 18:13
  • Also a note that const is not supported in all browsers unfortunately. – Lumpy Mar 29 '17 at 18:37
  • @Lumpy doesn't make the answer any less valid or useful. – Kevin B Mar 29 '17 at 18:41
1

If you are writing some polling function you must send request after previous was complete. The server have to respond to browser after several seconds. In this time server process all other requests. Here is example:

(function poll() {
            console.log('polling called');

            $.ajax({
                url: "/server/call",
                type: 'GET',
                dataType: "json",
                timeout: 30000,
                success: function (data) {
                    var currentdate = new Date();
                    var datetime = "Last Sync: " + currentdate.getDate() + "/" + (currentdate.getMonth() + 1) + "/"
                        + currentdate.getFullYear() + " @ "
                        + currentdate.getHours() + ":"
                        + currentdate.getMinutes() + ":"
                        + currentdate.getSeconds();

                    console.log(datetime);
                    console.log('call was successful at: ' + datetime);
                },
                complete: function () {
                    setTimeout(function () {
                        poll()
                    }, 200) //do nothing 200ms
                }
            });
        })();
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

  • Looks like running your code snippet, the actual ajax call does not get executed since it does not log out the statements within the success. It only logs the "polling called" statement. – Lumpy Mar 29 '17 at 17:58
  • Of course it's not :) Because server does not exists :) It's just an example to show how to implement long-polling – Alex Slipknot Mar 29 '17 at 18:44
  • What I meant was it did not work when I implemented it in my environment either. Sorry for the confusion. Thanks – Lumpy Mar 30 '17 at 15:00
  • Ah, ok, so what exactly doesn't work? Any error? If request was not successful you can add method to detect what kind of error happened – Alex Slipknot Mar 30 '17 at 15:15
  • I apologize, it was a mistake on my end. The server request had an error and never returned. Your solution is a very valid one and should work in all browsers. – Lumpy Apr 2 '17 at 13:27

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