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I have read in some places that EF already implements it's own UnitOfWork and transactions.

I am looking at the following solutions: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/aspnet/mvc/overview/older-versions/getting-started-with-ef-5-using-mvc-4/implementing-the-repository-and-unit-of-work-patterns-in-an-asp-net-mvc-application

I don't really like this because I don't want to have to manually add in every type of repo I have as that goes against the reason for the GenericRepository which I've already put in a lot of work to making generic already.

Also looking at the UnitOfWork Attribute solution described here but backing away because of the reasons discussed by the author himself: Entity Framework Core 1.0 unit of work with Asp.Net Core middleware or Mvc filter

But let me try to lay out my question in the discussion below.

I have a Generic Repo and a Generic Service. They are registered in my Startup like this:

services.AddScoped(typeof(IGenericRepository<>), typeof(GenericRepository<>));
services.AddScoped(typeof(IGenericService<>), typeof(GenericService<>));

My Generic Repo looks like this (leaving out Interfaces for brevity):

public enum FilteredSource
{
    All,
    GetAllIncluding,
}

public class GenericRepository<T> : IGenericRepository<T>
    where T: BaseEntity
{
    protected readonly ApplicationDbContext _context;
    protected DbSet<T> _dbSet;

    public GenericRepository(ApplicationDbContext context)
    {
        _context = context;
        _dbSet = context.Set<T>();
    }

    // no eager loading
    private IQueryable<T> All => _dbSet.Cast<T>();

    // eager loading
    private IQueryable<T> GetAllIncluding(
        params Expression<Func<T, object>>[] includeProperties) =>
         includeProperties.Aggregate(All, (currentEntity, includeProperty) => currentEntity.Include(includeProperty));

    // eager loading
    public async Task<T> GetSingleIncludingAsync(
        long id, params Expression<Func<T, object>>[] includeProperties)
    {
        IQueryable<T> entities = GetAllIncluding(includeProperties);
        //return await Filter<long>(entities, x => x.Id, id).FirstOrDefaultAsync();
        return await entities.SingleOrDefaultAsync(e => e.Id == id);
    }

    // no eager loading
    public async Task<T> GetSingleIncludingAsync(long id)
    {
        return await _dbSet.SingleOrDefaultAsync(e => e.Id == id);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Takes in a lambda selector and let's you filter results from GetAllIncluding or All.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="selector">labmda expression to filter results by.</param>
    /// <param name="getFilteredSource">All or GetAllIncluding as the method to get results from.</param>
    /// <param name="includeProperties">array of eager load lamda expressions.</param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public async Task<IEnumerable<T>> GetFiltered(
        Expression<Func<T, bool>> selector, FilteredSource filteredSource,
        Expression<Func<T, object>>[] includeProperties = null)
    {
        var results = default(IEnumerable<T>);
        switch (filteredSource)
        {
            case FilteredSource.All:
                results = All.Where(selector);
                break;
            case FilteredSource.GetAllIncluding:
                results = GetAllIncluding(includeProperties).Where(selector);
                break;
        }
        return await results.AsQueryable().ToListAsync();
    }

    public async Task<IEnumerable<T>> GetUnFiltered(
        FilteredSource filteredSource,
        Expression<Func<T, object>>[] includeProperties = null)
    {
        var results = default(IEnumerable<T>);
        switch (filteredSource)
        {
            case FilteredSource.All:
                results = All;
                break;
            case FilteredSource.GetAllIncluding:
                results = GetAllIncluding(includeProperties);
                break;
        }
        return await results.AsQueryable().ToListAsync();
    }

    public async Task<T> InsertAsync(T entity)
    {
        if (entity == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException($"No {nameof(T)}  Entity was provided for Insert");
        }
        await _dbSet.AddAsync(entity);
        return entity;
    }

    public async Task<T> UpdateAsync(T entity)
    {
        T entityToUpdate = await
            _dbSet.AsNoTracking().SingleOrDefaultAsync(e => e.Id == entity.Id);
        if (entityToUpdate == null)
        {
            //return null;
            throw new ArgumentNullException($"No {nameof(T)}  Entity was provided for Update");
        }

        _dbSet.Update(entity);
        return entity;
    }

    public async Task<T> DeleteAsync(T entity)
    {
        _dbSet.Remove(entity);
        return await Task.FromResult(entity);
    }

    public Task SaveAsync() => _context.SaveChangesAsync();

}

Service Layer looks like this:

public class GenericService<T> : IGenericService<T>
    where T : BaseEntity
{
    private IGenericRepository<T> _genericRepo;

    public GenericService(IGenericRepository<T> genericRepo)
    {
        _genericRepo = genericRepo;
    }

    public async Task<IEnumerable<T>> GetFiltered(
        Expression<Func<T, bool>> selector, FilteredSource filteredSource,
        Expression<Func<T, object>>[] includeProperties = null)
    {
        return await _genericRepo.GetFiltered(selector, filteredSource,
            includeProperties);
    }

    public async Task<IEnumerable<T>> GetUnFiltered(
        FilteredSource filteredSource,
        Expression<Func<T, object>>[] includeProperties = null)
    {
        return await _genericRepo.GetUnFiltered(filteredSource,
            includeProperties);
    }

    // no eager loading
    public async Task<T> GetSingleIncludingAsync(long id)
    {
        return await _genericRepo.GetSingleIncludingAsync(id);
    }
    // eager loading
    public async Task<T> GetSingleIncludingAsync(long id, params Expression<Func<T, object>>[] includeProperties)
    {
        T entity = await _genericRepo.GetSingleIncludingAsync(id, includeProperties);
        //return await Filter<long>(entities, x => x.Id, id).FirstOrDefaultAsync();
        return entity;
    }

    public async Task<T> InsertAsync(T entity)
    {
        var result = await _genericRepo.InsertAsync(entity);
        await _genericRepo.SaveAsync();
        return entity;
    }

    public async Task<T> UpdateAsync(T entity)
    {
        var result = await _genericRepo.UpdateAsync(entity);
        if (result != null)
        {
            await _genericRepo.SaveAsync();
        }
        return result;
    }

    public async Task<T> DeleteAsync(T entity)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

An example of a MVC Core Web API controller that uses the service looks like this:

[Route("api/[controller]")]
public class EmployeesController : Controller
{
    private IGenericService<Employee> _genericService;

    public EmployeesController(IGenericService<Employee> genericService)
    {
        _genericService = genericService;
    }

    // GET: api/employees
    [HttpGet]
    public async Task<IEnumerable<Employee>> GetEmployeesAsync(
            string firstName = null, string lastName = null)
    {
        return await _genericService.GetFiltered(
                e => (string.IsNullOrEmpty(firstName) || e.FirstName.Contains(firstName))
                && (string.IsNullOrEmpty(lastName) || e.LastName.Contains(lastName)),
                FilteredSource.GetAllIncluding,
                new Expression<Func<Employee, object>>[] { a => a.Organization,
                b => b.PayPlan,
                c => c.GradeRank,
                d => d.PositionTitle,
                e => e.Series,
                f => f.BargainingUnit }
            );
    }

    // GET api/employees/5
    [HttpGet("{id}", Name = "GetEmployeeById")]
    public async Task<IActionResult> GetEmployeeByIdAsync(long id)
    {
        var employee = await _genericService.GetSingleIncludingAsync(id,
            a => a.Organization,
            b => b.PayPlan,
            c => c.GradeRank,
            d => d.PositionTitle,
            e => e.Series,
            f => f.BargainingUnit);

        if (employee == null)
        {
            return NotFound();
        }
        else
        {
            return new ObjectResult(employee);
        }
    }

    // PUT api/employees/id
    [HttpPut("{id}")]
    public async Task<IActionResult> PutEmployeeAsync([FromBody] Employee emp)
    {
        var employee = await _genericService.UpdateAsync(emp);
        if (employee == null)
        {
            return NotFound();
        }

        return new ObjectResult(employee);
    }
} 

So here are my questions: The way I understand it, UnitOfWork is used in case you bring in two repositories into a service or controller. If you manipulate data in repo 1 and it passes, and then manipulate data in repo 2 and it fails (or visa versa) you want to roll everything back.

So far I am not using two repos. But if this situation occurs, it will be because I am bringing in two GenericServices to a controller, which will in turn bring in two GenericRepos.

Now lets talk about scope. I have to bring in my GenericRepo as Scoped. Not Singleton. Because if I query an object on one request, and then try to update that object on the next request, I will get an error that the object cannot be updated because it is already being tracked by the Singleton Repo from the previous request. So I bring it in Scoped as shown in the StartUp segment:

services.AddScoped(typeof(IGenericRepository<>), typeof(GenericRepository<>));
services.AddScoped(typeof(IGenericService<>), typeof(GenericService<>));

I also bring in the service as scoped. Pretty much guessing I should bring it in as scoped also.

Now, if I bring in a GenericService of Type Employee -> which gets a GenericRepository of Type Employee into a controller and I also bring in GenericService of Type Case -> which gets a GenericRepository of Type Case, are these two different GenericRepos? Or are they the same Repo? Will they be treated as the same transaction and all pass or fail together?

Or do I need to manually implement UnitOfWork?

Another factor I think that goes into this is whether the following baked into Core DI line is Singleton or Scoped:

services.AddDbContext<ApplicationDbContext>(options =>
options.UseSqlServer(Configuration.GetConnectionString("MyConn")));
  • As I understand your question, my point of view is: no, you don't need to implement Uow on .NET Core, because it's better to design the controllers and business objects or repositories according to features: HumanResources instead of Employee, Sales instead of Order. Also Uow is an object that allows to commit changes, so if you have your repositories you can commit changes in action controller – H. Herzl Mar 28 '17 at 20:46
  • In general, Singletons are evil, especially in a web application. duckduckgo.com/singletonitis – Chris F Carroll Mar 28 '17 at 23:47
0

You are right to use Scoped but see below: it's your ApplicationDbContext that must be scoped, the services and repos can be transient.

Since IGenericRepo<Employee> is a different type to IGenericRepo<Case> yes you will get two different GenericRepo<T>'s (and the same logic applies to the services).

But about the UnitOfWork pattern in the article you link, I don't get your comment that "I don't really like this because I don't want to have to manually add in every type of repo ..."

You could change the UoW code in the article to a GenericUnitOfWork<T1,T2> ?

Or you could take the view that for each controller which needs to write to 2 repos, you write a UoW class specifically for it. Note that you can strip out the lazy getter code that the article uses in its UoW class, because your repos are already created for you anyway by the services container, so the UoW reduces to only a few lines of mostly-boiler code anyway.

public class UnitOfWork<T1,T2> : IDisposable 
{
    ApplicationDbContext context;
    GenericRepo<T1> Repo1 {get; private set;}
    GenericRepo<T2> Repo2 {get; private set;}

    public UnitOfWork(ApplicationDbContext context)
    {
      this.context=context;
      Repo1 =new GenericRepo<T1>(context)
      Repo2 =new GenericRepo<T2>(context)
    }

    public void Save()
    {
        context.SaveChanges();
    }

    private bool disposed = false;

    protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (!this.disposed)
        {
            if (disposing)
            {
                context.Dispose();
            }
        }
        this.disposed = true;
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        Dispose(true);
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }
}

But here's the important thing: the UoW pattern as presented in the article depends crucially on both repos using the same DbContext (otherwise it would be a distributed transaction and requires more code)

So it's important that your ApplicationDbContext is scoped:

services.AddScoped(typeof(ApplicationDbContext), typeof(ApplicationDbContext));

However, you do have to be sure that every controller in your application can happily accept this constraint that it should only need one underlying ApplicationDbContext. For must cases, it should be fine.

Finally, you might as well be explicit that the real dependency is the DbContext:

public class EmployeesController : Controller
{
  UnitofWork<T1,T2> uow;

  public EmployeesController(ApplicationDbContext dbContext)
  {
    this.uow= new UnitofWork<Employee,Case>(dbContext)
  }
//...
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