33

No existing question has an answer to this question.

In c# 7, can I switch directly on a System.Type?

When I try:

    switch (Type)
    {
      case typeof(int):
        break;
    }

it tells me that typeof(int) needs to be a constant expression.

Is there some syntatic sugar that allows me to avoid case nameof(int): and directly compare the types for equality? nameof(T) in a case statement is not completely good because namespaces. So although name collision is probably not be applicable for int, it will be applicable for other comparisons.

In other words, I'm trying to be more direct than this:

    switch (Type.Name)
    {
      case nameof(Int32):
      case nameof(Decimal):
        this.value = Math.Max(Math.Min(0, Maximum), Minimum); // enforce minimum 
        break;
    }
  • 5
    In c# 7, can I switch directly on a System.Type? Considering that you've provided the answer to this in your question, why even ask? You know the answer. – Servy Mar 28 '17 at 21:46
  • 2
    @Servy, no I don't. My example isn't the answer. It's the counter-example. – toddmo Mar 28 '17 at 21:47
  • 2
    Rather than using a switch, can you build a Dictionary<Type, Action> that calls the function you want for a given type? Your code would be cleaner that way, I think. – xxbbcc Mar 28 '17 at 21:48
  • 5
    @toddmo it tells me that typeof(int) needs to be a constant expression. That's literally the answer to your question. – Servy Mar 28 '17 at 21:48
  • 2
    @toddmo Maybe you should explain why you want to switch on System.Type, when you can just switch on the value? I guess you would need typeof(value) before. – Matthias247 Mar 28 '17 at 21:53
58

The (already linked) new pattern matching feature allows this.

Ordinarily, you'd switch on a value:

switch (this.value) {
  case int intValue:
    this.value = Math.Max(Math.Min(intValue, Maximum), Minimum);
    break;
  case decimal decimalValue:
    this.value = Math.Max(Math.Min(decimalValue, Maximum), Minimum);
    break;
}

But you can use it to switch on a type, if all you have is a type:

switch (type) {
  case Type intType when intType == typeof(int):
  case Type decimalType when decimalType == typeof(decimal):
    this.value = Math.Max(Math.Min(this.value, Maximum), Minimum);
    break;
}

Note that this is not what the feature is intended for, it becomes less readable than a traditional if...else if...else if...else chain, and the traditional chain is what it compiles to anyway. I do not recommend using pattern matching like this.

  • Can you chain whens? Instead of case Type t when (t == typeof(int) || t == typeof(decimal)) : – toddmo Mar 28 '17 at 22:04
  • @toddmo (Responding to your edited comment) With || it's not what chaining would be, but any condition is valid, including one composed of multiple subexpressions combined using &&, ||, and any other operator you like. – user743382 Mar 28 '17 at 22:07
  • 2
    Why do you declare fresh Type variable instead of using discard pattern: case var _ when type == typeof(int)? – PetSerAl Mar 29 '17 at 3:01
  • @PetSerAl In the general case: to prevent the switch value from being evaluated multiple times. In this case: I don't know if it would be better, but it probably at least wouldn't be worse than what I put in my answer. I still wouldn't use either though. – user743382 Mar 29 '17 at 6:07
9

Starting with Paulustrious's idea of switching on a constant, but striving for the most readability:

  Type type = GetMyType();
  switch (true)
  {
    case bool _ when type == typeof(int):
      break;
    case bool _ when type == typeof(double):
      break;
    case bool _ when type == typeof(string):
      break;
    default:
      break;
  }

What's readable is subjective. I used to do something similar in VB a long time ago so I got used to this form (but in VB the bool _ was not needed so it wasn't there). Unfortunately in c# the bool _ required. I'm using c# 7.0 and I think switching on a constant may not be supported in earlier compilers but I am not sure about that, so try it if you want to. I think it's kindof amusing that the S/O code formatter doesn't know about when yet.

You wouldn't want to do this of course if you need the case variable, like for subclasses.

But for arbitrary boolean expressions it is more suited, for example:

  switch (true)
  {
    case bool _ when extruder.Temperature < 200:
      HeatUpExtruder();
      break;
    case bool _ when bed.Temperature < 60:
      HeatUpBed();
      break;
    case bool _ when bed.Y < 0 || bed.Y > 300:
      HomeYAxis();
      break;
    default:
      StartPrintJob();
      break;
  }

Some will argue this is worse than if..else. The only thing I can say is switch forces one path and it's impossible to break the switch statement itself, but it is possible to leave out an else and break an if..else into multiple statements unintentionally, possibly executing two "branches" accidentally.

Switching on a Type is really just an arbitrary switch because what we are really switching on is a property of the variable. Unless and until we can do case typeof(int) (case on something that is not a constant expression), we are stuck with something akin to this if we don't want to use string constants, which in the case of type names, are not in the framework.

  • You pretty much covered it there. It is purely another way of if-then-else-if. But if we adopt that concept what is the purpose of any switch statement? It improves readability, less likely to forget a 'not' and as you say it catches the missing else. FYI. c# V7 is the first version to support this, and the first version where the order of the case statements makes any difference. I understand about your VB. I used Powerbuilder and that had a choose statement which gave you similar capabilities. Finally can have multiple 'ifs' in a when clause. – Paulustrious Oct 11 '17 at 20:38
7

The issue raised here by the OP is that you can't use the new C# 7 type-based switch feature when you don't have an actual instance of the switched-upon type available, and you instead have only have its putative System.Type. The accepted answer, summarized as follows, works well for exact type matching (minor improvement shown here, but see my final example below for yet further streamlining)...

Type type = ...
switch (type)
{
    case Type _ when type == typeof(Int32):
    case Type _ when type == typeof(Decimal):
        this.value = Math.Max(Math.Min(this.value, Maximum), Minimum);
        break;
}

...but it's important to note that for derived reference type hierarchies this will not exhibit the same behavior as an if... else chain which uses the is keyword for matching. Consider:

class TBase { }
class TDerived1 : TBase { }
class TDerived2 : TBase { }
class TDerived3 : TDerived2 { }

TBase inst = ...

if (inst is TDerived1)
{
    // Handles case TDerived1
}
else if (inst is TDerived2)
{
    // Handles cases TDerived2 and TDerived3
}
else if (inst is TDerived3)
{
    // NOT EXECUTED                            <---  !
}

Since TDerived3 "is-a" TDerived2, both cases are handled by the earlier condition when using is matching. This highlights the different runtime semantics between 'strict' or 'exact' type equality versus a more nuanced notion of type compatibility. Because the types in the OP's question were ValueType primitives (which can't be derived-from), the difference couldn't matter. But if we adapt the 'exact type matching' of the accepted answer with the example classes shown above, we will get a different result:

Type type = ...

switch (type)
{
    case Type _ when type == typeof(TDerived1):
        // Handles case TDerived1
        break;

    case Type _ when type == typeof(TDerived2):
        // Handles case TDerived2
        break;

    case Type _ when type == typeof(TDerived3):
        // Handles case TDerived3              <---  !
        break;
}

In fact, C# 7 won't even compile a switch statement which corresponds to the if / else sequence shown earlier. (n.b. It seems like the compiler should detect this as a warning, rather than an error, since the harmless result is just a branch of inaccessible code--a condition which the compiler deems a warning elsewhere--and also considering that the compiler doesn't even detect, at all, the seemingly identical situation in the if / else version). Here's that:

enter image description here

In any case, which one of the alternate behaviors is appropriate, or if it even matters, will depend on your application, so my point here is just to draw attention to the distinction. If you determine that you need the more savvy type-compatibility version of the switch approach, here is how to do it:

Type type = ...

switch (type)
{
    case Type _ when typeof(TDerived1).IsAssignableFrom(type):
        // Handles case TDerived1
        break;

    case Type _ when typeof(TDerived2).IsAssignableFrom(type):
        // Handles cases TDerived2 and TDerived3
        break;

    case Type _ when typeof(TDerived3).IsAssignableFrom(type):
        // NOT EXECUTED                       <-- !
        break;
}

Finally, as I mentioned in another answer on this page, you can simplify this usage of the switch statement even further. Since we're only using the when clause functionality, and since we presumably still have the original switched-upon instance available in a variable, there's no need to mention that variable in the switch statement, nor repeat its Type (Type, in this case) in each case. Just do the following instead:

Type type = ...

switch (true)
{
    case true when typeof(TDerived1).IsAssignableFrom(type):
        break;

    case true when typeof(TDerived2).IsAssignableFrom(type):
        break;

    case true when typeof(TDerived3).IsAssignableFrom(type):
        break;
}

Notice the switch(true) and case(true). I recommend this simpler technique whenever you are relying only on the when clause (that is, beyond just the situation of switching on System.Type as discussed here).

  • I think you should swap the 2 things like this. It should be: typeof(TDerivedN).IsAssignableFrom(type). And also put case #3 first. – N73k May 28 at 20:12
  • @N73k The order that I specified for IsAssignableFrom is correct. It is an instance method call on the lesser-derived Type. As you note, swapping the order is directly related to the order of the case statements, which therefore is also correct as specified. – Glenn Slayden May 31 at 19:14
  • Hmm. I don't think so. For example if type is a TDerived4 (where TDerived4 : TDerived3) then you'd want your last line (the one with "TDerived3") to be triggered. But no case statements get triggered because TDerived4 is not assignable from any of the TDeriveds in the case statements. – N73k Jun 3 at 19:32
  • @N73k Mea culpa. I updated the answer to incorporate your correction. – Glenn Slayden Sep 21 at 9:46
1

@toddmo suggested the following:

switch (true)
{
    case bool _ when extruder.Temperature < 200:
        HeatUpExtruder();
        break;

    // etc..
    default:
        StartPrintJob();
        break;
}

...but why not go even further in his pursuit of simplicity. The following works just as well without needing the bool type qualification, nor the extraneous _ dummy variable:

switch (true)
{
    case true when extruder.Temperature < 200:
        HeatUpExtruder();
        break;

    // etc.
    default:
        StartPrintJob();
        break;
}
0

I found a simple and efficient way. It requires C# V7 to run. The switch("") means all cases will be satisfied up to the when clause. It uses the when clause to look at the type.

List<Object> parameters = new List<object>(); // needed for new Action
parameters = new List<object>
{
    new Action(()=>parameters.Count.ToString()),
    (double) 3.14159,
    (int) 42,
    "M-String theory",
    new System.Text.StringBuilder("This is a stringBuilder"),
    null,
};
string parmStrings = string.Empty;
int index = -1;
foreach (object param in parameters)
{
    index++;
    Type type = param?.GetType() ?? typeof(ArgumentNullException);
    switch ("")
    {
        case string anyName when type == typeof(Action):
            parmStrings = $"{parmStrings} {(param as Action).ToString()} ";
            break;
        case string egStringBuilder when type == typeof(System.Text.StringBuilder):
            parmStrings = $"{parmStrings} {(param as System.Text.StringBuilder)},";
            break;
        case string egInt when type == typeof(int):
            parmStrings = $"{parmStrings} {param.ToString()},";
            break;
        case string egDouble when type == typeof(double):
            parmStrings = $"{parmStrings} {param.ToString()},";
            break;
        case string egString when type == typeof(string):
            parmStrings = $"{parmStrings} {param},";
            break;
        case string egNull when type == typeof(ArgumentNullException):
            parmStrings  = $"{parmStrings} parameter[{index}] is null";
            break;
        default: throw new System.InvalidOperationException();
    };
} 

This leaves parmStrings containing...

System.Action 3.14159, 42, M-String theory, This is a stringBuilder, parameter[5] is null

  • 1
    You are switching on a string and whenning on a Type, instead of switching on a Type, is that faster? because it's a bit harder to follow. The person looking at it is scratching their head for a moment wondering what the case expressions mean (turns out they don't mean anything to the compiler, but the variable names make it seem as they do, as you are using them like comments, but this is not readily clear). – toddmo Oct 7 '17 at 16:30
  • @toddmo You're right. I have looked at the code generated and it is simple. Far less expensive than some of the earlier solutiosn. I didn't consider that the variable names would cause confusion. But once you have seen it and understand, it's far easier next time you come across it. I use the String variable names as comments. Say there are four bool or bool? variables. I will call once case TTFN. (N=null). The next, say TxxT is conditions 1 & 4 true and 2 & 3 are irrelevant. It makes it easy to find and of course you have the default to catch the ones you forgot. – Paulustrious Oct 8 '17 at 22:46
  • You should add the code generated. That would be pretty interesting. Anyway, the true issue is deeper than confusing maintenance developers, and I'm not smart enough ATM to explain it. It has to do with doing things that the compiler won't enforce. I guess it would be more of an issue if the whenning variable wasn't System.Type, but some base type with many subclasses, like System.Exception, for example. At any rate, the "comment variables" can get out of sync with the whenning variable. And if you think they never would, you haven't met my co-workers lol – toddmo Oct 9 '17 at 16:50
  • @toddmo. The only reason I used type in my whenning ways is that's what the OP requested. In another answer I will grab some of my real code. This however doesn't address the OP's question so it may get removed.. – Paulustrious Oct 10 '17 at 18:02
  • See my answer where I tried to eliminate the disadvantage of the confusing variable names and confusing switch expression. – toddmo Oct 11 '17 at 15:46
0

Adding to the above answer, if you do not need the value to be used inside the case statement, you can use _. This syntax can be used to remove an unused variable warning message.

switch (this.value) {
  case int _:
    //Do something else without value.
    break;
  case decimal decimalValue:
    this.value = Math.Max(Math.Min(decimalValue, Maximum), Minimum);
    break;
}
-1

Here is an alternative which won't compile as the classes are missing:

bool? runOnUI = queuedAction.RunOnUI;  // N=null, T=true F=False
bool isOnUI = Statics.CoreDispatcher.HasThreadAccess;
bool isFF = queuedAction.IsFireAndForget;   // just makes it easier to read the switch statement
if (false == queuedAction.IsFireAndForget)
    IsOtherTaskRunning = true;

/* In the case statements below the string name is something like noFF_TN
 * The compiler ignores the string name. I have used them here to represent
 * the logic in the case statement:   ( FF = FireAnd Forget, T=true, F=false, N = null, * means 'whatever')
 * 
 *      isFF_** = FireAndForget QueuedAction
 *      noFF_** = Not FireAndForget so Wait for Task to Finish (as opposed to Complete)
 *      ****_T* = We are already on the UI thread 
 *      ****_F* = We are not on the UI thread 
 *      ****_*T = Run on the UI thread.
 *      ****_*F = Do not run on UI thread
 *      ****_*N = Don't care so run on current thread
 *      
 *  The last character is a "bool?" representing RunOnUI. It has
 *  three values each of which has a different meaning */

bool isTask;
switch ("ignore")
{
    /* Run it as an Action (not Task) on current Thread   */
    case string noFF_TT when !isFF && isOnUI && runOnUI == true:
    case string isFF_TN when isFF && isOnUI && !runOnUI == null:
    case string isFF_FN when isFF && !isOnUI && runOnUI == null:
    case string isFF_TT when isFF && isOnUI && runOnUI == true:
    case string isFF_FF when isFF && !isOnUI && runOnUI == false:
        isTask = false;
        queuedAction.ActionQA(queuedAction); // run as an action, not as a Task
        break;

    /* Create a Task, Start it */

    case string isFF_TF when isFF && isOnUI == true && runOnUI == false:
    case string noFF_TN when !isFF && isOnUI == true && runOnUI == null:     // <== not sure if I should run it on UI instead
    case string noFF_TF when !isFF && isOnUI && runOnUI == false:
    case string noFF_FN when !isFF && !isOnUI && runOnUI == null:
    case string noFF_FF when !isFF && !isOnUI && runOnUI == false:
        var cancellationTokenSource = new CancellationTokenSource();
queuedAction.Canceller?.SetCancellationTokenSource(cancellationTokenSource);
        isTask = true;
        new Task
            (
                (action) => queuedAction.ActionQA(queuedAction),
                queuedAction,
                cancellationTokenSource.Token
            )
            .Start();
        break;

    /* Run on UI and don't wait */

    case string isFF_FT when isFF && !isOnUI && runOnUI == true:
        isTask = true;
        Statics.RunOnUI(() => queuedAction.ActionQA(queuedAction), asTaskAlways: true);
        break;

    /* Run on the UI as a Task and Wait */

    case string noFF_FT when !isFF && !isOnUI && runOnUI == true:
        isTask = true;
        Statics.RunOnUI(() => queuedAction.ActionQA(queuedAction), asTaskAlways: true);
        break;

    default:
        throw new LogicException("unknown case");
}

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