2

Here is the test code:

class A{};
class B : public A{};

void Test(const std::vector<A>& a)
{
}

int main()
{
    std::vector<A> a;
    std::vector<B> b;
    Test(a);
    Test(b);//Compiler Error
    return 0;
}

Since std::vector<A> and std::vector<B> is different type, we can't make conversion from one to another.

An optional way can be:

class A{};
class B : public A{};

void Test(const std::vector<A>& a)
{
}

int main()
{
    std::vector<A> a;
    std::vector<B> b;
    Test(a);
    Test(std::vector<A>(b.begin(), b.end()));
    return 0;
}

It acts, but it takes extra copying from B to A. If A or B is a large object, it can be very slow. A better choice is:

class A{};
class B : public A{};

void Test(const std::vector<A>& a)
{
}

int main()
{
    std::vector<A> a;
    std::vector<B> b;
    Test(a);
    Test(std::vector<A>(std::make_move_iterator(b.begin()), std::make_move_iterator(b.end())));
    return 0;
}

Since it just move the iter instead of the whole B class, it take a better performance. But there are some extra cost - If b is a very large vector with huge number of items, iteration also can slow down my code.

So I wonder if there is a way to directly convert std::vector<B> to std::vector<A> without any extra cost?

  • 1
    I'm not sure what you mean by "just move the iter". The last example move-constructs instances of A from instances of B, leaving contents of b in an indeterminate state in the process (which may or may not be a problem). Anyway, no, there's no magical cost-free way to construct a vector<A> from a vector<B>. – Igor Tandetnik Mar 29 '17 at 4:29
1

One approach is to make the vector a template parameter of the Test function. The calling code will remain the same, there is no copying required.

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

class A{
public:
    virtual void print() const {
        std::cout << "A" << std::endl;
    }   
};
class B : public A{
    virtual void print() const {
        std::cout << "B" << std::endl;
    }   
};

template <typename ContainerA>
void Test(const ContainerA& aas)
{
    for(const A& a:aas) {
        a.print();
    }
}

int main()
{
    std::vector<A> a;
    a.push_back(A());
    std::vector<B> b;
    b.push_back(B());
    Test(a);
    Test(b);
    return 0;
}
  • Bonus point for a useful concept constraining ContainerA from Test. – YSC Mar 29 '17 at 11:58
1

I don't know if it's useful for you but the best I can think is pass std::vector<Derived> to the function and iterate the element as Base elements.

Something like

template <typename D>
void Test (std::vector<D> const & v)
 {
   for ( A const & elem : v )
    {
      // use elem
    }
 }

Using SFINAE you can enable Test() only for vectors of Base or derived from Base elements as follows

template <typename D>
typename std::enable_if<std::is_base_of<A, D>::value>::type
     Test (std::vector<D> const & v)
 {
   for ( A const & elem : v )
    {
      // use elem
    }
 }

So you have

int main ()
 {
   std::vector<A>   a;
   std::vector<B>   b;
   std::vector<int> c;

   Test(a);    // compile
   Test(b);    // compile
   // Test(c); // compiler error
 }
  • This is a way acted but sometimes Test is a 3rd-party function which you should not change it – Ringo_D Mar 31 '17 at 2:37

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