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I have a list of objects in a hierarchical structure. I want to build complex LINQ queries against that object list based on "conditions" a client company sets and are stored in the database. So I need to build these at run time, but because they will be run repeatedly whenever the client's users update or refresh their data I would like to store the LINQ queries in objects rather than rebuild them each time.

I have looked at ScottGu's Blog about Dynamic LINQ.
Also this article about using expression trees.
Neither of these appear to provide an adequate solution, but I may not be understanding them adequately. I'm afraid that I'm trying to use LINQ when I should consider other options.

My object hierarchy:

WorkOrder[]
    Field[]
    Task[]
        Field[]

Here is an example of a LINQ query that I would like to store and execute. I can reasonably build this format based on the database records that define the conditions.

var query =
from wo in WorkOrders
from woF in wo.Fields
from task in wo.Tasks
from taskF in task.Fields
from taskF2 in task.Fields
where woF.Name == "System Status"
    && woF.Value.Contains("SETC")
    && taskF.Name == "Material"
    && taskF.Value == "Y"
    && taskF2.Name == "Planner"
    && taskF2.Value == "GR5259"
select new
{
    wo_id = wo.ID,
    task_id = task.ID
};

A few considerations.

  • Depending on the complexity of the user defined conditions I may or may not need to pull from the different object lists: the "froms" are dynamic.
  • Note that in this example I pulled twice from the task.fields[] so I aliased it two times.
  • The example LINQ structure allows me to have complex ANDs, ORs, parenthesis, etc. that I don't believe is practical with Dynamic Chaining or Expression Trees.

In my code I envision:

//1) Retrieve business rules from DB. I can do this.

//2) Iterate through the business rules to build the linq queries.
foreach (BusinessRule br in BusinessRules) {
    //Grab the criteria for the rule from the DB. 

    //Create a linq to object query based on the criteria just built.
    //Add this query to a list for later use.
}

...Elsewhere in application.

//Iterate through and execute the linq queries in order to apply business rules to data cached in the application.
foreach (LinqQuery q in LinqQueries) {
    //Execute the query

    //Apply business rule to the results.
}

Thank you very much for your thoughts, effort and ideas.

  • What do you mean "store them in objects"? Store what? The result of the query? Use a cache. The expression? What would you store? It's an expression. Are you trying to say that you want to dynamically compose queries? – David L Mar 29 '17 at 3:57
  • 1
    Thank you for asking. Ideally, when the application begins I could dynamically build the LINQ queries I need and store them in a static class and then reference them for repeated use. My list of WorkOrder objects will frequently change and I want to execute the LINQ queries against it in order to perform business rules against those particular objects. – Jeff Mar 29 '17 at 15:28
  • Just to be clear: I want to store the LINQ query definition, not the results. – Jeff Mar 29 '17 at 15:36
  • Your query object is the stored LINQ query. What do you mean exactly by "store"? – Guillaume CR Mar 30 '17 at 17:58
  • Have you tried the PredicateBuilder? albahari.com/nutshell/predicatebuilder.aspx – Guillaume CR Mar 30 '17 at 18:13
0

You can technically achieve what you need using only LINQ, but the PredicateBuilder is a nice utility class:

public enum AndOr
{
    And,
    Or
}

public enum QueryableObjects
{
    WorkOrderField,
    TaskField
}

public class ClientCondition
{
    public AndOr AndOr;
    public QueryableObjects QueryableObject;
    public string PropertyName;
    public string PropertyValue;
}

public void PredicateBuilderExample()
{
    var conditions = new List<ClientCondition> {
    {
        new ClientCondition { AndOr = LINQ.AndOr.And,
            QueryableObject = QueryableObjects.WorkOrderField,
            PropertyName = "System Status",
            PropertyValue = "SETC"
        }
    },
    {
        new ClientCondition{AndOr = AndOr.And,
            QueryableObject = QueryableObjects.TaskField,
            PropertyName = "Material",
            PropertyValue = "Y"
        }
    },
    {
        new ClientCondition{AndOr = AndOr.Or,
            QueryableObject = QueryableObjects.TaskField,
            PropertyName = "Planner",
            PropertyValue = "GR5259"
        }
    }
    };

    //Obviously this WorkOrder object is empty so it will always return empty lists when queried.
    //Populate this yourself.
    var WorkOrders = new List<WorkOrder>();

    var wofPredicateBuilder = PredicateBuilder.True<WorkOrderField>();
    var tfPredicateBuilder = PredicateBuilder.True<TaskField>();

    foreach (var condition in conditions)
    {
        if (condition.AndOr == AndOr.And)
        {
            if (condition.QueryableObject == QueryableObjects.WorkOrderField)
            {
                wofPredicateBuilder = wofPredicateBuilder.And(
                    wof => wof.Name == condition.PropertyName &&
                        wof.Value.Contains(condition.PropertyValue));
            }
        }
        if (condition.AndOr == AndOr.Or)
        {
            if (condition.QueryableObject == QueryableObjects.TaskField)
            {
                tfPredicateBuilder = tfPredicateBuilder.Or(
                    tf => tf.Name = condition.PropertyName &&
                        tf.Value.Contains(condition.PropertyValue));
            }
        }
        //And so on for each condition type.
    }

    var query = from wo in WorkOrders
                from woF in wo.Fields.AsQueryable().Where(wofPredicateBuilder)
                from task in wo.Tasks
                from taskF in task.Fields.AsQueryable().Where(tfPredicateBuilder)
                select new
                {
                    wo_id = wo.ID,
                    task_id = task.ID
                };
}

Note that I use the enums to limit the possible conditions your clients can send you. To have a truly dynamic queryable engine, you will need to use Reflection to ensure the object names you receive are valid. That seems like a rather large scope, and at that point I would recommend researching a different approach, such as ElasticSearch.

Also note that the order of And and Ors matters significantly. Essentially you are allowing your customers to build SQL queries against your data, and that usually ends in tears. It's your job to limit them to the proper set of conditions they should be querying.

| improve this answer | |
  • Yes, but please take it one more step. I keep hitting the road block of multiple criteria from, for example, the task fields. In the example I provided I showed 2. How would I do that? If I understand your code you're only joining to the task fields once. I might have 0 or X number of criteria to filter from. – Jeff Mar 30 '17 at 20:42
  • I added the OR condition for your task field. As an exercise, try adding the And condition for a Task field. Your code should go where my comment //And so on for each... is. – Guillaume CR Mar 30 '17 at 21:14
  • I've updated the original question adding how I envision the code. – Jeff Mar 30 '17 at 21:16
  • I'm probably missing something, but it doesn't work for me with the 2nd criteria for task fields. As I it it ends up being "PropertyName==Material && PropertyValue==Y && PropertyName==Planner && PropertyValue==GR5259. This will never be true. Thanks again Guillaume – Jeff Mar 30 '17 at 23:35
  • I modified the query to join to task.fields a 2nd time and it works. So how to add the "from" statements dynamically? var query = from wo in WorkOrders from woF in wo.Fields.AsQueryable().Where(wofPredicateBuilder) from task in wo.Tasks from taskF in task.Fields.AsQueryable().Where(tfPredicateBuilder) from taskF2 in task.Fields.AsQueryable().Where(f2 => f2.Name == "Planner" && f2.Value == "WE5259") select new { wo_id = wo.ID, task_id = task.ID}; – Jeff Mar 31 '17 at 15:20
0

Based on the discussion with Guillaume I would only suggest to pay attention to the type of the resulting query when playing around with advanced dynamic query generation. If you are changing the shape of what is being returned via Select, Aggregate, or one of the other methods you will expect your inner type to change accordingly. If you are just filtering with Where you can keep adding on as many additional cases you want unless you want OR behavior then things like PredicateBuilder helps. If you want to pull in more data via Join, Zip, ... then you are either doing so to filter, add to the rows returned, and possibly change the shape of the data.

I've done a lot of this in the past and had most success focusing on specific helper methods that allow for common cases that I need and then leaning on linq expression trees and patterns such as the visitor pattern to allow custom expression built at runtime.

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