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I have trained a network on two different modals of the same image. I pass the data together in one layer but after that, it is pretty much two networks in parallel, they don't share a layer and the two tasks have different set of labels, therefore I have two different loss and accuracy layers.

  1. I have read that caffe averages multiple losses and accuracy (following this question How can I have multiple losses in a network in Caffe?), is it the case only when at least a layer is shared? I intended to create an ensemble, however now it seems like I simply have two different networks. I intended to average the losses & accuracy so that both network branches would contribute to one accuracy. On training I see two separate losses & accuracy. How do I get this average loss & accuracy while testing on a new image pair?

  2. By forwarding the network, is it possible to get two predictions at all? If so, how?

  • What do you mean by 'averaging' accuracy of the tasks ? If the tasks are different, what does the average of the corresponding accuracy give. – Jayant Agrawal Mar 29 '17 at 16:31
  • You have a good point. I have realized after posting this, what I have is merely two separate networks. What I wish is to jointly learn these two tasks. For example, the prediction of a class of task 1 should be higher in presence of the task 2 predicting a certain class label. I don't want to join them at feature level but at prediction level. – dusa Mar 30 '17 at 17:03
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Multiple Losses can be used with one network using the caffe-parameter loss_weight. For example, you can have the following for one of your loss layers with weight 0.5 .

...
layer{
  name: "loss_a"
  type: "SigmoidCrossEntropyLoss"
  bottom: "fc8_a"
  bottom: "attributes_a"
  top : "loss_a"
  loss_weight : 0.5
 }

 layer{
  name: "loss_b"
  type: "SigmoidCrossEntropyLoss"
  bottom: "fc8_b"
  bottom: "attributes_b"
  top : "loss_b"
}

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