6

I'm stuck in something I thought so simple that it drives me out of myself.

I need to declare a Task in some point and run it later, I thought of:

Task T1 { get; set; }

public async Task CreateAndAwaitAsync()
{
    T1 = new Task(() => {
        // time consuming work like:
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(1000);
    }

    await T1;
}

Of course the body of the lambda AND the method are just for the sake of this example (as I said I need to run it later), but no matter what, with await T1 I just cannot make it into the lambda! What am I missing?? I feel stupid because I have been using the async-await paradigm for quite the few years already that I didn't even imagine this wouldn't work!

3
  • 1
    You are missing starting your task. await will not start it for you. And if you don't want to start it - just don't await it - return as is (and remove async keyword from method).
    – Evk
    Mar 29, 2017 at 14:38
  • 6
    Do not use the Task constructor. If you simply want to queue up CPU bound work use T1 = Task.Run(() => ....
    – JSteward
    Mar 29, 2017 at 14:44
  • @JSteward I can't because that way the Task starts right away! I need to start it in another moment and in another place than when and where I'm declaring it, It is specified in the post.
    – Shockwaver
    Mar 31, 2017 at 12:56

5 Answers 5

6

I thought it can be answered in comment but better to provide more info.

await means "wait for this task to complete, then do the rest stuff". Task from your example is not started. await will not start it for you, so the whole method will just stuck at await until you start the task.

Even with your current code, if you later do T1.Start() - it will run your lambda and after it is completed - your task returned by CreateAndAwaitAsync will also complete.

Otherwise - either start task right when creating it (Task.Run) or just return Task directly without any async\await:

public Task CreateAndAwaitAsync()
{
    T1 = new Task(() => {
        // time consuming work like:
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(1000);
    }
    // if you need to start it somewhere, do T1.Start();
    return T1;
}
3
  • Perfect... so wherever I need to start the task, I will need first to call the Start and then await it! Understood! Thank you!
    – Shockwaver
    Mar 29, 2017 at 14:53
  • Note that in the code you provided there is no reason to await a task - just return it from the method. Of course if you have more complex code in reality - the situation might be different.
    – Evk
    Mar 29, 2017 at 14:54
  • 1
    Of course but just like I said, that was for the sake of the example... the await of the task will be done in another function, in another moment
    – Shockwaver
    Mar 29, 2017 at 14:56
2

Like @Evk said, you need to call T1.Start()

public async Task CreateAndAwaitAsync()
    {
        T1 = new Task(() =>
        {
            // time consuming work like:
            System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(1000);
        });

        T1.Start();
        await T1;
    }
1
  • Perfect! Thank you!
    – Shockwaver
    Mar 29, 2017 at 14:59
1

You are not starting the task.

Example:

public async Task DoSomething()
{
    await Task.Run(() => SomeMethod());
}
3
  • I need to assign the task to a Property to call it later
    – Shockwaver
    Mar 29, 2017 at 14:48
  • Regardless, you still need to run / start the task. Mar 29, 2017 at 14:51
  • Right, just before the await
    – Shockwaver
    Mar 29, 2017 at 15:01
1

Unless you are doing CPU-bound work you almost never need to call Task.Run but can just use async/await like:

  public async Task DelayMe()
  {
    await Task.Delay(1000);
    await MoreAsyncThings();
  }

  Task T1 { get; set; }

  public async Task CreateAndAwaitAsync()
  {
    T1 = DelayMe();
    await T1;
  }

Update:

To store code for later execution I would propose to simple use a lambda like:

Func<Task> SomeWorkFactory()
{
  return async () => 
  { 
    await AsyncStuff(); 
    // More Stuff 
  };
}

var deferedWork = SomeWorkFactory();

// later somewhere else

await deferedWork(); 

So basically calling "SomeWorkFactory" creates the work package but only calling the Func executes it and also returns an awaitable Task.

Maybe relevant:

If you provide methods which do CPU-bound work (like calculating something as opposed to waiting for a callback) you should not offer an async signature at all but leave the execution mode to the caller. Mainly because asynchronism and concurrency are different concepts. Mads Torgersen gave some insights on this here: https://channel9.msdn.com/Events/TechEd/NorthAmerica/2014/DEV-B362 and calls it "library methods should not lie" (From minute 42)

4
  • I cannot foretell what MoreAsyncThings will be queued to the task in question, so it has to be a standalone entity that I can queue in a caller defined somewhere else with who-knows other work to be done
    – Shockwaver
    Mar 29, 2017 at 15:17
  • 1
    I don't think I have completely understood your overall problem. If you want to execute some code later you might be better of storing it as a lambda function instead of inside a "full blown" Task. I will update the code sample above. Mar 29, 2017 at 15:37
  • Again! That example is just an example!! It was just about starting the task! My prop is already a lambda that i invoke when i want to start the task but I kept the example as simple as possible to make you focus on the problem I had and not on optimizing my code. Question was simple: why my await is not starting the task I created? (I do not need to specify that i get that task by compiling a func lambda! You do not need to know it!). Evk answered almost immediately: "because you are a stupid monkey: your await is not magically starting a Task for you you must .Start it first!". NICE!
    – Shockwaver
    Mar 31, 2017 at 12:53
  • The "overall problem" is perfectly described in my question, I will quote myself: "no matter what, with await T1 I just cannot make it into the lambda! What am I missing??"
    – Shockwaver
    Mar 31, 2017 at 12:58
0

You're only creating a Task but it is not running even with await here. Try to Start() it, or you can assign T1 = Task.Run(your => lambda) and then it should work when you awaiting it

13
  • 1
    With Task.Run the action of the task is scheduled for immediate execution, but I need to execute it ONLY when I will call await T1 later on (it wasn't me to downvote you)
    – Shockwaver
    Mar 29, 2017 at 14:50
  • @Shockwaver Yet your question doesn't state that. And regardless, you're awaiting it immediately, not after a while.
    – Servy
    Mar 29, 2017 at 14:53
  • 1
    @Servy Yes I did, read the second line of the post. And again read at the end: it was just an example.
    – Shockwaver
    Mar 29, 2017 at 14:57
  • 1
    @Servy Yes it does, later means later... for sure not when I'm declaring it with the Task.Run don't you think so? ;) Come on... XD 'When' is irrelevant, since 'Later' already pushes it away from the time of declaration...
    – Shockwaver
    Mar 29, 2017 at 15:03
  • 1
    Come on guys, take extended discussions to the chat if you really need to discuss this.
    – PJvG
    Mar 29, 2017 at 15:10

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