2

This is an example dataframe:

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np

values = np.array([
        [0, 1, 2, 0, 0, 4],
        [1, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0 ],
        [0, 4, 0, 0, 2, 1],
        [2, 0, 2, 0, 4, 0],        
        ])

indexes= 'a','b','c','d'

columns='ab','bc','cd','de','ef','fg'

df = pd.DataFrame(index=indexes,columns=columns, data=values)

print(df)

from this dataframe I need to create a series of pie charts, one for every column, shown on the same figure, where the slices dimension is fixed (equal to 100/len(indexes)) and the color of the slices depends on the value of the index, in particular: white if 0, green if 1, yellow if 2, red if 4.

What suggestions can you give me?

I found that:

df.plot(kind='pie', subplots=True, figsize=(len(columns)*2, 2))   

it creates a series, but I can't control the input values...

I've created a pie for a column, but then I wasn't able to link the color to the value of index:

labels = indexes
sizes = np.linspace(100/len(labels),100/len(labels), num=len(labels))


fig1, ax1 = plt.subplots()
ax1.pie(sizes, labels=labels)
ax1.axis('equal')  

plt.show()

ImportanceOfBeingErnest answer has helped me giving to the piechart the wanted look:

fig1, ax1 = plt.subplots()

labels = indexes
sizes = np.linspace(100/len(labels),100/len(labels), num=len(labels))
coldic = {0 : "w", 1 : "g", 2 : "y", 4 : "r" } 
colors = [coldic[v] for v in values[:,0]]

ax1.pie(sizes, labels=labels, colors=colors,counterclock=False, startangle=90)
ax1.axis('equal') 

plt.show()

Now the colors a linked to the values, and the dimensions of the slices are fixed. I just need to have the same pie chart for all the columns and in the same image.

The importance of these charts is given by the colors, not the dimensions of the slices, which I want to be always equal.

Thanks for your time!

2

Not relying on pandas internal plotting functions (which are of course limited) one can use matplotlib' pie function to plot the diagrams.

The colors can be set as a list, which is generated from the values according to some mapping dictionary.

enter image description here

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
coldic = {0 : "w", 1 : "g", 2 : "y", 4 : "r" } 
values = np.array([
        [0, 1, 2, 0, 0, 4],
        [1, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0 ],
        [0, 4, 0, 0, 2, 1],
        [2, 0, 2, 0, 4, 0],        
        ])

labels= ['a','b','c','d']

fig1, axes = plt.subplots(ncols=values.shape[1], )

for i in range(values.shape[1]):
    colors = [coldic[v] for v in values[:,i]]
    labs = [l if values[j,i] > 0 else "" for j, l in enumerate(labels)]
    axes[i].pie(values[:,i], labels=labs, colors=colors) 
    axes[i].set_aspect("equal")

plt.show()

For fixed wedge sizes you just use a fixed array to supply to pie.

enter image description here

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
coldic = {0 : "w", 1 : "g", 2 : "y", 4 : "r" } 
values = np.array([
        [0, 1, 2, 0, 0, 4],
        [1, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0 ],
        [0, 4, 0, 0, 2, 1],
        [2, 0, 2, 0, 4, 0],        
        ])

labels= ['a','b','c','d']

fig1, axes = plt.subplots(ncols=values.shape[1], )

for i in range(values.shape[1]):
    colors = [coldic[v] for v in values[:,i]]
    axes[i].pie(np.ones(values.shape[0]), labels=labels, colors=colors, 
            wedgeprops=dict(linewidth=1, edgecolor="k")) 
    axes[i].set_aspect("equal")
    axes[i].set_title("".join(list(map(str,values[:,i]))))

plt.show()
  • Thanks for your answer it solves partially my problem :) I've edited my question to try to explain better my problem! – Paauulus Mar 30 '17 at 8:37
  • Sorry, that wasn't clear. Is the solution now what you expect? – ImportanceOfBeingErnest Mar 30 '17 at 8:51
  • Now it's perfect! Thanks – Paauulus Mar 30 '17 at 9:01
  • One more thing, I would like to show the name of the column over every pie chart, I tried inserting a plt.title(columns[i]) inside the loop, but it doesn't work. What can I do? Thanks – Paauulus Mar 30 '17 at 9:20
  • plt.title sets the title for the last axes. Instead, use ax.set_title() where ax is the axes you want to set the title to. See updated answer. – ImportanceOfBeingErnest Mar 30 '17 at 9:27

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