69

This error started to pop up after I migrated to TS 2.2.2, so I'm assuming that's the problem... The code did not stop working, but now I receive that error and I tried a few things like returning an empty observable, catching the re-thrown exception and returning an object, nothing seemed to work. Why is this happening now? Shouldn't it understand I'm re-throwing the exception and not expect a return? Am I misreading the error?

This is the complete error description:

enter image description here

Here's the complete code:

return request
    .map((res: Response) => res.json())
    .catch((error: any) => {
        // todo: log?

        if (error.status == 500) {
            this.alertService.showError(error.statusText);
        } else if (error.status == 588) {
            this.alertService.showAlert(error.statusText);
        }

        Observable.throw(error.statusText);
    });

I tried returning the Observable, but my wrapper method expects a return of type T, which is the return of my deserialized request (map(...)). If I do return the throw this is the error I get:

[ts] Type 'Observable' is not assignable to type 'T'

I'm using:

  • Angular4
  • Typescript 2.2.2

4 Answers 4

105

you have to return the Observable

 return request
    .map((res: Response) => res.json())
    .catch((error: any) => {
        // todo: log?

        if (error.status == 500) {
            this.alertService.showError(error.statusText);
        } else if (error.status == 588) {
            this.alertService.showAlert(error.statusText);
        }

        return Observable.throw(error.statusText);
    });
5
  • Hey thank you for your answer, I had tried that before. It doesn't work because my wrapper method expects a return of type T. Please check my updated question. I'm sorry I forgot to add that. Thanks again.
    – eestein
    Mar 30, 2017 at 11:06
  • 2
    Bougarfaoui, I'm marking this as answer, because I was able to find out the problem now :) After your answer I decided to look more carefully into the code and I should indeed be returning it (even though the concept is still a little bit weird to me, since it's being re-thrown), but the problem was the expected return of my wrapper method. Once I changed that to expect Observable<T> it worked. Thank you.
    – eestein
    Mar 30, 2017 at 11:19
  • 1
    Note that the command is now Observable.throwError (rather than just .throw) after the RxJS update.
    – VSO
    Oct 7, 2019 at 17:23
  • throwError(response); or throw Error(err);
    – Enrico
    Nov 2, 2021 at 14:53
  • I'm getting Property 'throwError' does not exist on type 'typeof Observable'. ts(2339) (RxJS 7.4). Same thing with throw. Dec 7, 2021 at 14:31
10

Sometimes when you call catch without using arrow function like below

getUserList() {
    return this.http.get(this.constURL + '/api/url/here', this.headerOptions)
    .catch(this.handleError);
}

handleError(error: Response) {
    if (error.status == 500) {      
      this.router.navigate(['/login']);
    } else {
      return Observable.throw(error);
    }
}

then it gives error of

ERROR TypeError: Cannot read property 'navigate' of undefined not getting this

Because in handleError function this object is not accessible..if you console this.router then you will get undefined.. so this object not working and not getting router all available methods

So you have to use arrow function here like below

getUserList() {
    return this.http.get(this.constURL + '/api/url/here', this.headerOptions)
    .catch(error => { 
      return this.handleError(error);
    });
}

handleError(error: Response) {
    if (error.status == 500) {      
      this.router.navigate(['/login']);
    } else {
      return Observable.throw(error);
    }
}

Also if you have not mentioned return for handlerError function then it will throw error again like

Argument of type '(error: any) => void' is not assignable to parameter of type

So its necessary to type return for handlerError function.

Check here for in detail.He has explained code very well with all possible errors and solution of that..worked for me

2
  • You really shouldn't paste a long snippet of production code from a different app unrelated to the OP's answer. It's confusing to the people reading the answer and it's a bit unhelpful to OP.
    – tshm001
    May 2, 2018 at 14:07
  • Hi tshm001, i think i tried to explain code required for OP's question. Its not production code but made it readable by adding some actual services names..Please let me know if changes required, i will do..Thanks Dec 17, 2018 at 9:53
8

This is an answer for angular 6 with RXJS 6. In your request function, it would look similar to this. Note that catch has been replaced with catchError and Observable.throw is now throwError. Also in RXJS 6 we use pipe to join together a sequence of function we wish to perform instead of the dot chaining previously.

//In your service

getData(url: string): Observable<any> {
    let options = this.getHTTPOptions();
    return this.http.get<any>(url, options).pipe(
          catchError( (err: any, caught: Observable<any>) => { return 
        throwError(this.generalErrorHandler(err, caught)) } ) );
}

Then you can have an error handler. The key is to specify the keyword return in both the catchError function above and return the error in the handler. The arrow ( => ) allows you to pass the context of the calling function into the error handler which means you can do cool things such as this.router.navigate(['someroute']); (If you have the router imported in your service)

//In your service

  generalErrorHandler(error: any, caught: Observable<any>): Observable<any> {
    console.log('error caught: ', error);
    if( error.error.status == "INVALID_TOKEN" || error.error.status == "MAX_TOKEN_ISSUE_REACHED"){
      console.log('token has expired');
      this.logout();
      return error;
    }
    return error;
  }

Some key imports to get this to work:

//Imports for the service

import { HttpClient, HttpHeaders, HttpErrorResponse } from '@angular/common/http';
import { Http, Response } from '@angular/http';
import { catchError, map } from 'rxjs/operators';
import { Observable, throwError, of} from 'rxjs';

And lastly to subscribe to the request to get your data:

//In your component, don't forget to import your service

let response$ = this.someService.getData('url here');
response$.subscribe( 
    data => { console.log('do stuff to data here', data); },
    err => { console.log("couldn't get data, maybe show error to user"); },
    () => { console.log('function that is called upon finish'); }
);
5
 return Observable.throw(error);

The Observable. throw is deprecated use throwError operator like this in the interceptor

intercept(request: HttpRequest<unknown>, next: HttpHandler): Observable<HttpEvent<unknown>> {
   return next.handle(request).pipe(
    catchError(err => {
      if (err.status === 401) {
       // remove Bearer token and redirect to login page
        this.router.navigate(['/auth/login']);
      }
      return throwError( err );
    }));
}
1
  • I'm getting Property 'throwError' does not exist on type 'typeof Observable'. ts(2339) (RxJS 7.4) Dec 7, 2021 at 14:30

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