6

I have existing admin api code that I've simplifile down to this for testing purposes (this works):

admin.database().ref('/dropbox').on('child_added', function (childSnap) {

  let item, itemRef = childSnap.ref;

  console.log(`Item: ${JSON.stringify(childSnap.val())} at ${childSnap.key}`);
  console.log(`Item ref: ${itemRef.toString()}`);

  itemRef.transaction(function (value) {
    console.log(`Value: ${JSON.stringify(value)}`);
    if (value) {
      item  = value;
      return null;
    }
  }).then(function (resolution) {
    console.log(`Txn resolution: ${resolution.committed ? 'committed' : 'NOT-COMMITTED'}`);
    if (resolution.committed) {
      // process item
      console.log(`Process: ${JSON.stringify(item)}`);
    } else {
      // assume that item must have been removed by someone else
    }
  }).catch(function (err) {
    console.log(`Txn error: ${JSON.stringify(err, null, 2)}`);
  });

});

When I run:

firebase database:push /dropbox <<<'{"test":"abc123"}'

The console output is:

Item: {"test":"abc123"} at -KgTpp3FzgbLUrMNofNZ
Item ref: https://cloud-function-txn-test.firebaseio.com/dropbox/-KgTpp3FzgbLUrMNofNZ
Value: {"test":"abc123"}
Txn resolution: committed
Process: {"test":"abc123"}

I've been trying to move my code and this example to a cloud function. I realize that .on('child_added', f) and .onWrite(f) treat existing data differently but I can't get the transaction code to work correctly. The parameter passed to my transaction function is always null.

As a cloud function (this does not work):

exports.receiveAndRemove = functions.database.ref('/dropbox/{entryId}').onWrite(function (event) {

  if (!event.data.exists()) {
    return;
  }

  let item, itemRef = event.data.adminRef;

  console.log(`Item: ${JSON.stringify(event.data.val())} at ${event.data.key}`);
  console.log(`Item ref: ${itemRef.toString()}`);

  itemRef.transaction(function (value) {
    console.log(`Value: ${JSON.stringify(value)}`);
    if (value) {
      item  = value;
      return null;
    }
  }).then(function (resolution) {
    console.log(`Txn resolution: ${resolution.committed ? 'committed' : 'NOT-COMMITTED'}`);
    if (resolution.committed) {
      // process item
      console.log(`Process: ${JSON.stringify(item)}`);
    } else {
      // bad to assume here that item must have been removed by someone else
    }
  }).catch(function (err) {
    console.log(`Txn error: ${JSON.stringify(err, null, 2)}`);
  });

});

For some reason, the transaction never removes the item. Log output:

2017-03-30T10:51:19.387565284Z D receiveAndRemove: Function execution started
2017-03-30T10:51:19.395Z I receiveAndRemove: Item: {"test":"abc123"} at -KgTpp3FzgbLUrMNofNZ
2017-03-30T10:51:19.395Z I receiveAndRemove: Item ref: https://cloud-function-txn-test.firebaseio.com/dropbox/-KgTpp3FzgbLUrMNofNZ
2017-03-30T10:51:19.396Z I receiveAndRemove: Value: null
2017-03-30T10:51:19.396Z I receiveAndRemove: Txn resolution: NOT-COMMITTED
2017-03-30T10:51:19.418446269Z D receiveAndRemove: Function execution took 32 ms, finished with status: 'ok'

Of course, the cloud function fails to remove the item and because the transaction didn't commit the remove, also doesn't process the item. I expect both to happen and I expect this code to work even when the node server version is running. The items should always be processed exactly once no matter how how many instances are running in the cloud and/or my server.

Is there some subtle difference in cloud functions I am missing? Is there something I'm doing with transactions incorrectly or that doesn't work with cloud functions?

Full source: https://github.com/mscalora/cloud-function-txn-test.git

  • Try returning the promise returned from the transaction by adding a return in front of itemRef.transaction. The Cloud Function will not stick around for long in your code sample since you aren't returning the promise, which tells the Cloud Function to wait until it is resolved. Not sure it will solve your problem, but it might. – jwngr Mar 30 '17 at 21:12
  • I will try that but the log shows the both the transaction callback runs and the then also runs – Mike Mar 31 '17 at 21:35
  • Returning the promise did not change the behaviour, the log looks exactly the same. The transaction callback gets null. – Mike Apr 2 '17 at 2:47
6

The problem here is that in the scenario when the transaction value is null, you return undefined, which cancels the transaction. You actually need to handle the case when the value is null since Firebase may pass that value. The reason for this dive a bit into how Firebase transactions work.

In the first example, you have a local listener on the node you are doing the transaction on. This means you have the exact value for that node stored in the local cache. In the second example, you have the value for the node, but there is no actual listener for that node locally. The value comes from Cloud Functions itself and is not stored locally. Thus, when you do the transaction, Firebase will try right away with a "guess" of the value, which is always null to start. The transaction will retry once it hears from the server that the value is not null, and the server will tell it what the new value is. Then, the transaction will retry. However, because you don't handle the null case and simply return undefined, the transaction is cancelled.

I don't think you really need a transaction for what you are trying to do though. You can get the value of item in both your code samples without doing a transaction. For example, here is how you can update your Cloud Functions example:

exports.receiveAndRemove = functions.database.ref('/dropbox/{entryId}').onWrite(function (event) {
  if (!event.data.exists()) {
    return;
  }

  let item = event.data.val();
  let itemRef = event.data.adminRef;

  console.log(`Item: ${JSON.stringify(item)} at ${event.data.key}`);
  console.log(`Item ref: ${itemRef.toString()}`);

  return itemRef.remove();
});
  • Firstly, the docs for transaction() say A developer-supplied function which will be passed the current data stored at this location (as a JavaScript object). The function should return the new value it would like written (as a JavaScript object). If undefined is returned (i.e. you return with no arguments) the transaction will be aborted and the data at this location will not be modified. Nothing about a "guess". My understanding is that getting null means it was deleted by someone since the event was triggered since I have an if checking for null above. – Mike Apr 2 '17 at 22:42
  • 1
    Secondly, the transaction is needed to prevent a race condition. There's processing I want to perform exactly once for each item created, which I then delete in a workqueue pattern. The // process item comment is where that processing is done/initiated. Both the cloud function and the first version may be listening for new items in the /dropbox. – Mike Apr 2 '17 at 22:49
  • If the value is not there locally, the transaction will try with null. That is expected behavior. If you do need your transaction, you can fix your code simply by getting rid of the if (value) check. – jwngr Apr 3 '17 at 3:04
  • Then how would one tell the difference between someone else deleting the item since my hander started running and it still being there? Where is it documented that this is "expected behavior"? – Mike Apr 3 '17 at 3:46
  • It's expected behavior and documented. Transactions aren't the right tool for this. Try a work queue, have workers "claim" the items with a transaction and possibly delete when done. But don't delete as a means of "claiming." See firebase-queue for a more robust worker pattern. – Kato Apr 3 '17 at 22:00
0

From my understanding is that, cloud function is stateless therefore, there is no local cache. It always remove the instance if the method is no longer used after a certain period of time. That's why it always returns null.

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