6

I have a MessagesManager thread to which different threads may send messages and then this MessagesManager thread is responsible to publish these messages inside SendMessageToTcpIP() (start point of MessagesManager thread ).

class MessagesManager : IMessageNotifier
{
    //private
    private readonly AutoResetEvent _waitTillMessageQueueEmptyARE = new AutoResetEvent(false);
    private ConcurrentQueue<string> MessagesQueue = new ConcurrentQueue<string>(); 

    public void PublishMessage(string Message)
    {
        MessagesQueue.Enqueue(Message);
        _waitTillMessageQueueEmptyARE.Set();
    }

    public void SendMessageToTcpIP()
    {
        //keep waiting till a new message comes
        while (MessagesQueue.Count() == 0)
        {
            _waitTillMessageQueueEmptyARE.WaitOne();
        }

        //Copy the Concurrent Queue into a local queue - keep dequeuing the item once it is inserts into the local Queue
        Queue<string> localMessagesQueue = new Queue<string>();

        while (!MessagesQueue.IsEmpty)
        {
            string message;
            bool isRemoved = MessagesQueue.TryDequeue(out message);
            if (isRemoved)
                localMessagesQueue.Enqueue(message);
        }

        //Use the Local Queue for further processing
        while (localMessagesQueue.Count() != 0)
        {
            TcpIpMessageSenderClient.ConnectAndSendMessage(localMessagesQueue.Dequeue().PadRight(80, ' '));
            Thread.Sleep(2000);
        }
    }
}

The different threads (3-4) send their message by calling the PublishMessage(string Message) (using same object to MessageManager). Once the message comes, I push that message into a concurrent queue and notifies the SendMessageToTcpIP() by setting _waitTillMessageQueueEmptyARE.Set();. Inside SendMessageToTcpIP(), I am copying the message from the concurrent queue inside a local queue and then publish one by one.

QUESTIONS: Is it thread safe to do enqueuing and dequeuing in this way? Could there be some strange effects due to it?

12
  • Why are you checking for counts or using an AutoResetEvent? Why the local queue? The ConcurrentQueue is thred-safe and doesn't need any of that code. If you wanted to iterate over the existing messages you can use GetConsumingEnumerable(). That code can only introduce thread-safety problems – Panagiotis Kanavos Mar 30 '17 at 12:14
  • 1
    Because your messages (of type string) are immutable, this should be safe. If, however, your messages were mutable then even though the queue itself is threadsafe, your usage wouldn't necessarily be threadsafe. For example, if some other thread mutated a message while a different thread was using it. – Matthew Watson Mar 30 '17 at 12:16
  • I am using AutoResetEvent because the MessagesManager thread is calling SendMessageToTcpIP() and it should remain into waiting state until a new message comes. – skm Mar 30 '17 at 12:17
  • And how do you restart SendMessageToTcpIP? It seems it will run just once (no global while loop). – Evk Mar 30 '17 at 12:18
  • 1
    @skm which it will, even if you don't use that. Dequeueing a message is a blocking operation. A simple public void SendMessageToTcpIP(){ foreach(var message in MessageQueue.GetConsumingEnumerable(){TcpIpMessageSenderClient.ConnectAndSendMessage(message.PadRight(80, ' ');}} would be enough – Panagiotis Kanavos Mar 30 '17 at 12:21
4

While this is probably thread-safe, there are built-in classes in .NET to help with "many publishers one consumer" pattern, like BlockingCollection. You can rewrite your class like this:

class MessagesManager : IDisposable {
    // note that your ConcurrentQueue is still in play, passed to constructor
    private readonly BlockingCollection<string> MessagesQueue = new BlockingCollection<string>(new ConcurrentQueue<string>());

    public MessagesManager() {
        // start consumer thread here
        new Thread(SendLoop) {
            IsBackground = true
        }.Start();
    }

    public void PublishMessage(string Message) {
        // no need to notify here, will be done for you
        MessagesQueue.Add(Message);
    }

    private void SendLoop() {
        // this blocks until new items are available
        foreach (var item in MessagesQueue.GetConsumingEnumerable()) {
            // ensure that you handle exceptions here, or whole thing will break on exception
            TcpIpMessageSenderClient.ConnectAndSendMessage(item.PadRight(80, ' '));
            Thread.Sleep(2000); // only if you are sure this is required 
        }
    }

    public void Dispose() {            
        // this will "complete" GetConsumingEnumerable, so your thread will complete
        MessagesQueue.CompleteAdding();
        MessagesQueue.Dispose();
    }
}
2
  • will the publishers be able to push there messages to the MessageQueue when the SendLoop() is executing Thread.Sleep(2000); ? – skm Mar 30 '17 at 12:34
  • Yes sure, publishers can always push to your queue. – Evk Mar 30 '17 at 12:36
2

.NET already provides ActionBlock< T> that allows posting messages to a buffer and processing them asynchronously. By default, only one message is processed at a time.

Your code could be rewritten as:

//In an initialization function
ActionBlock<string> _hmiAgent=new ActionBlock<string>(async msg=>{
        TcpIpMessageSenderClient.ConnectAndSendMessage(msg.PadRight(80, ' '));
        await Task.Delay(2000);
);

//In some other thread ...
foreach ( ....)
{
    _hmiAgent.Post(someMessage);
}

// When the application closes

_hmiAgent.Complete();
await _hmiAgent.Completion;

ActionBlock offers many benefits - you can specify a limit to the number of items it can accept in a buffer and specify that multiple messages can be processed in parallel. You can also combine multiple blocks in a processing pipeline. In a desktop application, a message can be posted to a pipeline in response to an event, get processed by separate blocks and results posted to a final block that updates the UI.

Padding, for example, could be performed by an intermediary TransformBlock< TIn,TOut>. This transformation is trivial and the cost of using the block is greater than the method, but that's just an illustration:

//In an initialization function
TransformBlock<string> _hmiAgent=new TransformBlock<string,string>(
    msg=>msg.PadRight(80, ' '));

ActionBlock<string> _tcpBlock=new ActionBlock<string>(async msg=>{
        TcpIpMessageSenderClient.ConnectAndSendMessage());
        await Task.Delay(2000);
);

var linkOptions=new DataflowLinkOptions{PropagateCompletion = true};
_hmiAgent.LinkTo(_tcpBlock);

The posting code doesn't change at all

    _hmiAgent.Post(someMessage);

When the application terminates, we need to wait for the _tcpBlock to complete:

    _hmiAgent.Complete();
    await _tcpBlock.Completion;

Visual Studio 2015+ itself uses TPL Dataflow for such scenarios

Bar Arnon provides a better example in TPL Dataflow Is The Best Library You're Not Using, that shows how both synchronous and asynchronous methods can be used in a block.

3
  • How are the messages sent to Post(someMessage) are taken by ActionBlock? – skm Mar 30 '17 at 12:51
  • Post is a method of ActionBlock and all other blocks – Panagiotis Kanavos Mar 30 '17 at 12:52
  • @skm TPL Dataflow provides a two-step message sending protocol for linked block to ensure the delivery. – VMAtm Mar 31 '17 at 4:19
0

The code is thread safe since both ConcurrentQueue and AutoResetEvent are thread safe. your strings are anyway being read and never being written to, so this code is thread safe.

However, You have to make sure you call SendMessageToTcpIP in some sort of a loop.
otherwise , you have a dangerous race condition - some messages may get lost:

while (!MessagesQueue.IsEmpty)
        {
            string message;
            bool isRemoved = MessagesQueue.TryDequeue(out message);
            if (isRemoved)
                localMessagesQueue.Enqueue(message);
        }

        //<<--- what happens if another thread enqueues a message here?

        while (localMessagesQueue.Count() != 0)
        {
            TcpIpMessageSenderClient.ConnectAndSendMessage(localMessagesQueue.Dequeue().PadRight(80, ' '));
            Thread.Sleep(2000);
        }

Other than that, AutoResetEvent is extremely heavy object. it uses a kernel object to synchronize threads. every call is a system call which may be costly. consider using user mode synchronization object (doesn't .net provides some sort of condition variable?)

2
  • That loop is already provided by GetConsumingEnumerable(). Checking for empty or checking the count isn't necessary – Panagiotis Kanavos Mar 30 '17 at 13:01
  • @David: SendMessageToTcpIP() is under a while loop from the Main(). If a new message comes then, it will be processed during the next iteration (or next call) of SendMessageToTcpIP(). – skm Mar 30 '17 at 13:02
0

This is an refactored code snippet of how I would implement this functionality:

class MessagesManager {
    private readonly AutoResetEvent messagesAvailableSignal = new AutoResetEvent(false);
    private readonly ConcurrentQueue<string> messageQueue = new ConcurrentQueue<string>();

    public void PublishMessage(string Message) {
        messageQueue.Enqueue(Message);
        messagesAvailableSignal.Set();
    }

    public void SendMessageToTcpIP() {
        while (true) {
            messagesAvailableSignal.WaitOne();
            while (!messageQueue.IsEmpty) {
                string message;
                if (messageQueue.TryDequeue(out message)) {
                    TcpIpMessageSenderClient.ConnectAndSendMessage(message.PadRight(80, ' '));
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

Points to note here:

  1. This drains the queue completely: if there is at least one message, it will process all of them
  2. The 2000ms Thread sleep is removed
12
  • You don't need the AutoResetEvent at all. You could convert both methods to one line each – Panagiotis Kanavos Mar 30 '17 at 12:30
  • 1
    I think the signal is necessary: you want the consumer thread to wait until a message has arrived and not loop endlessly wasting CPU cycles. – Tamas Ionut Mar 30 '17 at 12:32
  • It loops because you used TryDequeue. If you didn't it would block waiting for a response. In fact, GetConsumingEnumerable() already handles the entire looping behaviour – Panagiotis Kanavos Mar 30 '17 at 12:32
  • 1
    TryDequeue will not block => it will return false if there is no element in the queue – Tamas Ionut Mar 30 '17 at 12:35
  • 1
    @PanagiotisKanavos, blocking collection is not same as concurrent. Signaling seems logical way to avoid excessive spinning in this case. Switching to blocking collection may or may not be an option or do you insist it's correct in all cases? E.g. what if PublishMessage is called by excessive number of writers where blocking (that's what BlockingCollection will do, right?) is undesired? – Sinatr Mar 30 '17 at 12:45

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