Following on from this answer to my question, I'm getting access denied errors when trying to set time from one PC to another.

I can't find any references for this on StackOverflow, so I think it's a useful resource to have here.

What are the general troubleshooting steps for this problem? (And more specifically, in my case with two XP embedded in Workgroup mode)

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Found an excellent resource for debugging workgroup problems here, I'm copying some of that page here, but please follow the link to get the full details.

  1. Check for a personal firewall problem. A misconfigured or malfunctioning personal firewall, on either computer, can block browser access. Do you have antivirus protection? Make sure that your antivirus is not part of a package that contains a personal firewall, and does not contain a component that acts as a firewall.

  2. Look carefully for a hardware firewall, sitting inside your computer. The nVidia nForce is probably the first, but surely not the last, device of this type.

  3. Some newer, WiFi routers, have a complete firewall between ALL client computers, connected wired or wireless. Look for an "Isolation Mode" setting, if no computers are visible to each other. Each vendor uses a different name for this feature, so read your user guide carefully, if you suspect that this is a problem.

  4. Make sure that NetBIOS Over TCP is consistently set, in TCP/IP Properties for each computer in your network.

  5. Does your LAN include any computers running Windows Vista? If so, be aware of the additional issues involved in Windows Vista and Windows Networking.

  6. Do you have a share setup on each computer? With Windows XP / Vista, only computers with non-administrative shares (not ending in "$") will be visible in My Network Places (aka Network Neighborhood).

  7. Make sure that all computers are in the same workgroup, if you expect to see them in the root of Network Neighborhood (My Network Places).

  8. Check for several well known and lesser known registry settings, which will affect visibility of, and access to, your server.

  9. Look at the content of the error message. Do you see either "error = 5" (aka "access denied"), or "error = 53" (aka "name not found")? Read the appropriate article, and follow the links.

  10. Look again at the complete and exact text in any observed error messages. Some very obscure errors have very simple resolutions.

  11. Run, and examine output from, "browstat status", "ipconfig /all", and "net config server" and "net config workstation", for each computer.

  12. Post output from the above step for expert interpretation and advice. Include relevant background details in your post. When including diagnostic logs, such as "browstat status", "ipconfig /all", or background details, format them properly when you post them.

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