1

The following code works as expected:

void foo(auto const &){}

auto const rng{ranges::view::all(v)};
ranges::for_each(rng, [](auto const & r){
    foo(r);
});

But the following:

void foo(auto const &){}

auto const rng{ranges::view::all(v)};
ranges::for_each(rng, &foo);

Gives the compilation error:

template argument deduction/substitution failed:
couldn't deduce template parameter 'F'

I took a look at the source but to be honest I couldn't understand the problem.

3

You cannot take the address of an overloaded or template function by without explicitly specifying the overload/instantiation you desire.

Passing a lambda expression as in your first snippet is a good solution to this issue.

Alternatively, if you have access to foo, you could turn it into a function object:

namespace detail
{
    struct foo_t
    {
        template <typename T>
        void operator()(const T&) const { /* ... */ }
    };
}

constexpr detail::foo_t foo{};

This allows you to write:

ranges::for_each(rng, foo);
| improve this answer | |
  • Oh. The function has auto as a parameter type. That went totally out of my head. So my question has nothing with rangesv3. Thanks! – nikitablack Mar 31 '17 at 13:13
3

A function name doesn't represent the function; it is the overload set of the function name.

Your function

void foo(auto const &){}

appears to be using a concepts-esque extension of the language for a terse template function. In standard C++ it would read:

template<class T>
void foo(T const &){}

A template function isn't a function. It is an overload set of functions generated by that template.

An overload set of a function name is not a C++ object. And the things you can pass to functions are C++ objects.

Now, when the overload set of a function name only names one function, the compiler automatically resolves the overload and gives you that function object.

When the overload set of a function name is converted to a pointer-to-function with a fixed signature, overload resolution kicks in and (hopefully) one is selected.

When calling for_each, however, the argument is not a specific fixed signature function pointer. Instead it is a generic type parameter. The compiler, at that point, has no way to resolve the overload set of the function name. It is ambiguous which one you want.

There are two solutions. One of them is to cast your function overload set into a specific function pointer. This requires you are explicit.

A second one is top wrap your overload set into a single object. You can do this with a manual function object with a template operator(), or in C++14 you can do this:

#define OVERLOADS_OF(...) \
   [](auto&&...args) \
   noexcept(noexcept(__VA_ARGS__(decltype(args)(args)...))) \
   ->decltype( __VA_ARGS__(decltype(args)(args)...) ) \
   { return __VA_ARGS__(decltype(args)(args)...); }

which builds a stateless lambda representing the overloads of a global function name.

So:

void foo(auto const &){}

auto const rng{ranges::view::all(v)};
ranges::for_each(rng, OVERLOADS_OF(foo));

if you want to catch fewer corner cases, a simple:

void foo(auto const &){}

auto const rng{ranges::view::all(v)};
ranges::for_each(rng, [](auto&x){foo(x);});

also works in this specific case.

As an aside, there was a C++20 proposal to replace OVERLOADS_OF(foo) with [](auto&&...args)=>foo(decltype(args)(args)...) (generating the same effect as the macro would). Sadly, the decltype and noexcept features where voted down.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    "Sadly, the decltype and noexcept features where voted down." Too soon. :( – Vittorio Romeo Mar 31 '17 at 13:18
  • Thank you. #define OVERLOADS_OF(...) looks scary - macros plus forward referenced variadic auto. o_O – nikitablack Mar 31 '17 at 13:33
  • 1
    @nikitablack Well, it tries to be complete. Notice that [](auto&x){foo(x);} solves your problem in this specific case; OVERLOADS_OF just solves almost every corner case we can all in one spot. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Mar 31 '17 at 13:36
  • 1
    I wouldn't say it was "voted down." I was under the impression that I just had to come back with a better paper (my proposal, btw). Also what I really wanted was something like [](args...) => foo(>>args...), but it still needs a lot of work, we'll see what happens. – Barry Mar 31 '17 at 13:54
  • @Barry I dunno. Having to name args twice violates DRY. How about []=>foo(>>@...), where @ is an implicit parameter pack of the arguments of the auto&&... arguments. (I kid) – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Mar 31 '17 at 14:00

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