4

I have the following string:

brasília

And I need to convert to:

brasilia

Withou the ´ accent!

How can I do on BigQuery?

Thank you!

5

Try below as quick and simple option for you:

#standardSQL
WITH lookups AS (
  SELECT 
  'ç,æ,œ,á,é,í,ó,ú,à,è,ì,ò,ù,ä,ë,ï,ö,ü,ÿ,â,ê,î,ô,û,å,ø,Ø,Å,Á,À,Â,Ä,È,É,Ê,Ë,Í,Î,Ï,Ì,Ò,Ó,Ô,Ö,Ú,Ù,Û,Ü,Ÿ,Ç,Æ,Œ,ñ' AS accents,
  'c,ae,oe,a,e,i,o,u,a,e,i,o,u,a,e,i,o,u,y,a,e,i,o,u,a,o,O,A,A,A,A,A,E,E,E,E,I,I,I,I,O,O,O,O,U,U,U,U,Y,C,AE,OE,n' AS latins
),
pairs AS (
  SELECT accent, latin FROM lookups, 
    UNNEST(SPLIT(accents)) AS accent WITH OFFSET AS p1, 
    UNNEST(SPLIT(latins)) AS latin WITH OFFSET AS p2
  WHERE p1 = p2
),
yourTableWithWords AS (
  SELECT word FROM UNNEST(
        SPLIT('brasília,ångström,aperçu,barège, beau idéal, belle époque, béguin, bête noire, bêtise, Bichon Frisé, blasé, blessèd, bobèche, boîte, bombé, Bön, Boötes, boutonnière, bric-à-brac, Brontë Beyoncé,El Niño')
    ) AS word
)
SELECT 
  word AS word_with_accent, 
  (SELECT STRING_AGG(IFNULL(latin, char), '')
    FROM UNNEST(SPLIT(word, '')) char
    LEFT JOIN pairs
    ON char = accent) AS word_without_accent
FROM yourTableWithWords   

Output is

word_with_accent word_without_accent     
blessèd         blessed  
El Niño         El Nino  
belle époque    belle epoque     
boîte           boite    
Boötes          Bootes   
blasé           blase    
ångström        angstrom     
bobèche         bobeche  
barège          barege   
bric-à-brac     bric-a-brac  
bête noire      bete noire   
Bichon Frisé    Bichon Frise     
Brontë Beyoncé  Bronte Beyonce   
bêtise          betise   
beau idéal      beau ideal   
bombé           bombe    
brasília        brasilia     
boutonnière     boutonniere  
aperçu          apercu   
béguin          beguin   
Bön             Bon   

UPDATE

Below is how to pack this logic into SQL UDF - so accent2latin(word) can be called to make a "magic"

#standardSQL
CREATE TEMP FUNCTION accent2latin(word STRING) AS
((
  WITH lookups AS (
    SELECT 
    'ç,æ,œ,á,é,í,ó,ú,à,è,ì,ò,ù,ä,ë,ï,ö,ü,ÿ,â,ê,î,ô,û,å,ø,Ø,Å,Á,À,Â,Ä,È,É,Ê,Ë,Í,Î,Ï,Ì,Ò,Ó,Ô,Ö,Ú,Ù,Û,Ü,Ÿ,Ç,Æ,Œ,ñ' AS accents,
    'c,ae,oe,a,e,i,o,u,a,e,i,o,u,a,e,i,o,u,y,a,e,i,o,u,a,o,O,A,A,A,A,A,E,E,E,E,I,I,I,I,O,O,O,O,U,U,U,U,Y,C,AE,OE,n' AS latins
  ),
  pairs AS (
    SELECT accent, latin FROM lookups, 
      UNNEST(SPLIT(accents)) AS accent WITH OFFSET AS p1, 
      UNNEST(SPLIT(latins)) AS latin WITH OFFSET AS p2
    WHERE p1 = p2
  )
  SELECT STRING_AGG(IFNULL(latin, char), '')
  FROM UNNEST(SPLIT(word, '')) char
  LEFT JOIN pairs
  ON char = accent
));

WITH yourTableWithWords AS (
  SELECT word FROM UNNEST(
        SPLIT('brasília,ångström,aperçu,barège, beau idéal, belle époque, béguin, bête noire, bêtise, Bichon Frisé, blasé, blessèd, bobèche, boîte, bombé, Bön, Boötes, boutonnière, bric-à-brac, Brontë Beyoncé,El Niño')
    ) AS word
)
SELECT 
  word AS word_with_accent, 
  accent2latin(word) AS word_without_accent
FROM yourTableWithWords 
  • It worked! Thanks @Mikhail. It's a very nice solution! – Felipe Carlo Mar 31 '17 at 20:23
  • @FelipeCarlo - sure. thank you for accepting/voting. you can further pack this into nice SQL UDF so it will be more usable/"portable"! – Mikhail Berlyant Mar 31 '17 at 20:25
  • @FelipeCarlo - see update with SQL UDF – Mikhail Berlyant Mar 31 '17 at 20:33
  • Thank you a lot, @Mikhail. It's an awesome solution! I'm already using it with UDF like you defined. – Felipe Carlo Mar 31 '17 at 20:41
3

It's worth mentioning that what you're asking for is a simplified case of unicode text normalization. Many languages have a function for this in their standard libraries (e.g., Java). One good approach would be to insert your text BigQuery already normalized. If that won't work -- for example, because you need to retain the original text and you're concerned about hitting BigQuery's row size limit -- then you'll need to do normalization on the fly in your queries.

Some databases have implementations of Unicode normalization of various completeness (e.g., PostgreSQL's unaccent method, PrestoDB's normalize method) for use in queries. Unfortunately, BigQuery is not one of them. There is no text normalization function in BigQuery as of this writing. The implementations on this answer are kind of a "roll your own unaccent." When BigQuery releases an official function, everyone should use that instead!

Assuming you need to do the normalization in your query (and Google still hasn't come out with a function for this yet), these are some reasonable options.

Approach 1: Use NORMALIZE

Google now has come out with a NORMALIZE function. (Thanks to @WillianFuks in the comments for flagging!) This is now the obvious choice for text normalization. For example:

SELECT REGEXP_REPLACE(NORMALIZE(text), r"\pM", '') FROM yourtable;

There is a brief explanation of how this works and why the call to REGEXP_REPLACE is needed in the comments.

I have left the additional approaches for reference.

Approach 2: Use REGEXP_REPLACE and REPLACE on Content

I implemented the lowercase-only case of text normalization in legacy SQL using REGEXP_REPLACE. (The analog in Standard SQL is fairly self-evident.) I ran some tests on a text field with average length around 1K in a large table of 28M rows using the query below:

SELECT id, text FROM
  (SELECT 
    id,
    CASE
    WHEN REGEXP_CONTAINS(LOWER(text), r"[àáâäåæçèéêëìíîïòóôöøùúûüÿœ]") THEN
      REGEXP_REPLACE(
        REGEXP_REPLACE(
          REGEXP_REPLACE(
            REGEXP_REPLACE(
              REGEXP_REPLACE(
                REPLACE(REPLACE(REPLACE(REPLACE(LOWER(text), 'œ', 'ce'), 'ÿ', 'y'), 'ç', 'c'), 'æ', 'ae'),
              r"[ùúûü]", 'u'),
            r"[òóôöø]", 'o'),
          r"[ìíîï]", 'i'),
        r"[èéêë]", 'e'),
      r"[àáâäå]", 'a')
    ELSE
      LOWER(text)
    END AS text
  FROM
   yourtable ORDER BY id LIMIT 10);

versus:

WITH lookups AS (
  SELECT 
  'ç,æ,œ,á,é,í,ó,ú,à,è,ì,ò,ù,ä,ë,ï,ö,ü,ÿ,â,ê,î,ô,û,å,ø,ñ' AS accents,
  'c,ae,oe,a,e,i,o,u,a,e,i,o,u,a,e,i,o,u,y,a,e,i,o,u,a,o,n' AS latins
),
pairs AS (
  SELECT accent, latin FROM lookups, 
    UNNEST(SPLIT(accents)) AS accent WITH OFFSET AS p1, 
    UNNEST(SPLIT(latins)) AS latin WITH OFFSET AS p2
  WHERE p1 = p2
)
SELECT foo FROM (
  SELECT 
    id,
    (SELECT STRING_AGG(IFNULL(latin, char), '') AS foo FROM UNNEST(SPLIT(LOWER(text), '')) char LEFT JOIN pairs ON char=accent) AS foo
  FROM
  yourtable ORDER BY id LIMIT 10);

On average, the REGEXP_REPLACE implementation ran in about 2.9s; the array-based implementation ran in about 12.5s.

Approach 3: Use REGEXP_REPLACE on Search Pattern

What brought me to this question my was a search use case. For this use case, I can either normalize my corpus text so that it looks more like my query, or I can "denormalize" my query so that it looks more like my text. The above describes an implementation of the first approach. This describes an implementation of the second.

When searching for a single word, one can use the REGEXP_MATCH match function and merely update the query using the following patterns:

a -> [aàáaâäãåā]
e -> [eèéêëēėę]
i -> [iîïíīįì]
o -> [oôöòóøōõ]
u -> [uûüùúū]
y -> [yÿ]
s -> [sßśš]
l -> [lł]
z -> [zžźż]
c -> [cçćč]
n -> [nñń]
æ -> (?:æ|ae)
œ -> (?:œ|ce)

So the query "hello" would look like this, as a regexp:

r"h[eèéêëēėę][lł][lł][oôöòóøōõ]"

Transforming the word into this regular expression should be fairly straightforward in any language. This isn't a solution to the posted question -- "How do I remove accents in BigQuery?" -- but is rather a solution to a related use case, which might have brought people (like me!) to this page.

  • 1
    I wonder how the normalization approach would work to solve this issue; I tried using the new normalize function but it didn't work. Do you know how to make it? – Willian Fuks Dec 18 '17 at 16:59
  • When you used the new NORMALIZE function, did you simply call NORMALIZE? By default, that function will decompose the "alphabetical" character from the "diacritic" characters to create a standardized sequence representation of accented characters, but it will not remove the diacritics. If you want to remove the diacritics, you need to perform another step; something like REGEXP_REPLACE(s, r"[^\pL\pN\pP\pS\pZ]", '') or REGEXP_REPLACE(s, r"[\pM]", '') will probably do the trick. (See here for the unicode character classes used here.) – sigpwned Dec 20 '17 at 2:16
  • very interesting information! thanks for that! – Willian Fuks Dec 20 '17 at 12:53
1

You can call REPLACE() or REGEXP_REPLACE(). You can find some regular expressions at Remove accents/diacritics in a string in JavaScript.

Alternatively, you can use javascript UDF, but I expect it to be slower.

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