33

Consider the following list:

a_list = ['πŸ€” πŸ™ˆ me asΓ­, bla es se 😌 ds πŸ’•πŸ‘­πŸ‘™']

How can I extract in a new list all the emojis inside a_list?:

new_lis = ['πŸ€” πŸ™ˆ 😌 πŸ’• πŸ‘­ πŸ‘™']

I tried to use regex, but I do not have all the possible emojis encodings.

10 Answers 10

46

You can use the emoji library. You can check if a single codepoint is an emoji codepoint by checking if it is contained in emoji.UNICODE_EMOJI.

import emoji

def extract_emojis(str):
  return ''.join(c for c in str if c in emoji.UNICODE_EMOJI)
  • You can download the list of emoji in string/int format present in #EmojiCodeSheet here, for custom comparator. – shanraisshan Apr 6 '17 at 6:33
  • your code cannot detect flags in the text : extract_emojis("πŸ‡΅πŸ‡° πŸ‘§ 🏿") – Noman Dilawar Mar 14 '18 at 11:30
  • @NomanDilawar that is because my code iterates over every character. Unicode flags are a combination of two "regional indicator" characters which are not, individually, emoji. If you want to detect Unicode flags you'll need to check pairs of characters. – Pedro Castilho Mar 16 '18 at 21:21
9

I think it's important to point out that the previous answers won't work with emojis like πŸ‘¨β€πŸ‘©β€πŸ‘¦β€πŸ‘¦ , because it consists of 4 emojis, and using ... in emoji.UNICODE_EMOJI will return 4 different emojis. Same for emojis with skin color like πŸ™…πŸ½.

My solution includes the emoji and regex modules. The regex module supports recognizing grapheme clusters (sequences of Unicode codepoints rendered as a single character), so we can count emojis like πŸ‘¨β€πŸ‘©β€πŸ‘¦β€πŸ‘¦

import emoji
import regex

def split_count(text):

    emoji_list = []
    data = regex.findall(r'\X', text)
    for word in data:
        if any(char in emoji.UNICODE_EMOJI for char in word):
            emoji_list.append(word)

    return emoji_list

Testing (with more emojis with skin color):

line = ["πŸ€” πŸ™ˆ me asΓ­, se 😌 ds πŸ’•πŸ‘­πŸ‘™ hello πŸ‘©πŸΎβ€πŸŽ“ emoji hello πŸ‘¨β€πŸ‘©β€πŸ‘¦β€πŸ‘¦ how are 😊 you todayπŸ™…πŸ½πŸ™…πŸ½"]

counter = split_count(line[0])
print(' '.join(emoji for emoji in counter))

output:

πŸ€” πŸ™ˆ 😌 πŸ’• πŸ‘­ πŸ‘™ πŸ‘©πŸΎβ€πŸŽ“ πŸ‘¨β€πŸ‘©β€πŸ‘¦β€πŸ‘¦ 😊 πŸ™…πŸ½ πŸ™…πŸ½

Edit:

If you want to include flags, like πŸ‡΅πŸ‡° the Unicode range would be from πŸ‡¦ to πŸ‡Ώ, so add:

flags = regex.findall(u'[\U0001F1E6-\U0001F1FF]', text) 

to the function above, and return emoji_list + flags.

See this post for more information about the flags.

  • Your code is working good, but how can we handle flags? "πŸ‡΅πŸ‡° " – Noman Dilawar Mar 14 '18 at 11:31
  • @NomanDilawar Hi, sorry for the delay. I edited my answer. I ran some tests and it seems to work fine now. – sheldonzy Mar 23 '18 at 12:46
  • UnicodeWarning: Unicode equal comparison failed to convert both arguments to Unicode - interpreting them as being unequal if any(char in emoji.UNICODE_EMOJI for char in word): is what I am getting. – kingmakerking May 31 '18 at 13:40
  • 1
    This is the only solution that I found to work comprehensively for all emojis I've encountered so far. – Paulo Malvar Apr 11 at 20:58
7

If you don't want to use an external library, as a pythonic way you can simply use regular expressions and re.findall() with a proper regex to find the emojies:

In [74]: import re
In [75]: re.findall(r'[^\w\s,]', a_list[0])
Out[75]: ['πŸ€”', 'πŸ™ˆ', '😌', 'πŸ’•', 'πŸ‘­', 'πŸ‘™']

The regular expression r'[^\w\s,]' is a negated character class that matches any character that is not a word character, whitespace or comma.

As I mentioned in comment, a text is generally contain word characters and punctuation which will be easily dealt with by this approach, for other cases you can just add them to the character class manually. Note that since you can specify a range of characters in character class you can even make it shorter and more flexible.

Another solution is instead of a negated character class that excludes the non-emoji characters use a character class that accepts emojies ([] without ^). Since there are a lot of emojis with different unicode values, you just need to add the ranges to the character class. If you want to match more emojies here is a good reference contain all the standard emojies with the respective range for different emojies http://apps.timwhitlock.info/emoji/tables/unicode:

  • 1
    That works for this particular input, but there are plenty of other non-emoji characters that don't fall under the categories of \w, \s, or comma. – user2357112 Apr 1 '17 at 4:18
  • @user2357112 A text is generally contain word characters and punctuation which will be easily dealt with by this approach, for other cases you can just add them to the character class manually.. Note that since you can specify a range of characters in character class you can even make it shorter and more flexible. – Kasrâmvd Apr 1 '17 at 5:04
  • 1
    Your regex fails on all non-comma punctuation, among other things. – user2357112 Apr 1 '17 at 5:11
  • @user2357112 Well that's what I said. You can add them to the character class if you want. You don't have to include all the cases always, its relative and based on the text that you're dealing with. – Kasrâmvd Apr 1 '17 at 5:13
  • 6
    Manually adding every non-emoji character from your text to your regex is a terrible, bloaty, error-prone solution. – user2357112 Apr 1 '17 at 5:36
4

The top rated answer does not always work. For example flag emojis will not be found. Consider the string:

s = u'Hello \U0001f1f7\U0001f1fa hello'

What would work better is

import emoji
emojis_list = map(lambda x: ''.join(x.split()), emoji.UNICODE_EMOJI.keys())
r = re.compile('|'.join(re.escape(p) for p in emojis_list))
print(' '.join(r.findall(s)))
3

The solution to get exactly what tumbleweed ask, is a mix between the top rated answer and user594836's answer. This is the code that works for me in Python 3.6.

import emoji
import re

test_list=['πŸ€” πŸ™ˆ me asΓ­,bla es,se 😌 ds πŸ’•πŸ‘­πŸ‘™']

## Create the function to extract the emojis
def extract_emojis(a_list):
    emojis_list = map(lambda x: ''.join(x.split()), emoji.UNICODE_EMOJI.keys())
    r = re.compile('|'.join(re.escape(p) for p in emojis_list))
    aux=[' '.join(r.findall(s)) for s in a_list]
    return(aux)

## Execute the function
extract_emojis(test_list)

## the output
['πŸ€” πŸ™ˆ 😌 πŸ’• πŸ‘­ πŸ‘™']
2

Step 1: Make sure that your text it's decoded on utf-8 text.decode('utf-8')

Step 2: Locate all emoji from your text, you must separate the text character by character [str for str in decode]

Step 3: Saves all emoji in a list [c for c in allchars if c in emoji.UNICODE_EMOJI] full example bellow:

>>> import emoji
>>> text     = "πŸ€” πŸ™ˆ me asΓ­, bla es se 😌 ds πŸ’•πŸ‘­πŸ‘™"
>>> decode   = text.decode('utf-8')
>>> allchars = [str for str in decode]
>>> list     = [c for c in allchars if c in emoji.UNICODE_EMOJI]
>>> print list
[u'\U0001f914', u'\U0001f648', u'\U0001f60c', u'\U0001f495', u'\U0001f46d', u'\U0001f459']

if you want to remove from text

>>> filtred  = [str for str in decode.split() if not any(i in str for i in list)]
>>> clean_text = ' '.join(filtred)
>>> print clean_text
me asΓ­, bla es se ds
2
from emoji import *

EMOJI_SET = set()

# populate EMOJI_DICT
def pop_emoji_dict():
    for emoji in UNICODE_EMOJI:
        EMOJI_SET.add(emoji)

# check if emoji
def is_emoji(s):
    for letter in s:
        if letter in EMOJI_SET:
            return True
    return False

This is a better solution when working with large datasets since you dont have to loop through all emojis each time. Found this to give me better results :)

0

Ok - i had this same problem and I worked out a solution which doesn't require you to import any libraries (like emoji or re) and is a single line of code. It will return all the emojis in the string:

def extract_emojis(sentence):
    return [word for word in sentence.split() if str(word.encode('unicode-escape'))[2] == '\\' ]

This allowed me to create a light-weight solution and i hope it helps you all. Actually - i needed one which would filter out any emojis in a string - and thats the same as the code above but with one minor change:

def filter_emojis(sentence):
        return [word for word in sentence.split() if str(word.encode('unicode-escape'))[2] != '\\' ]

Here is an example of it in action:

  • a = 'πŸ€” πŸ™ˆ me asΓ­, bla es se 😌 ds πŸ’•πŸ‘­πŸ‘™'
  • b = extract_emojis(a)
  • b = ['πŸ€”', 'πŸ™ˆ', '😌', 'πŸ’•πŸ‘­πŸ‘™']
0

This function expects a string so converting the list of input to string

a_list = 'πŸ€” πŸ™ˆ me asΓ­, bla es se 😌 ds πŸ’•πŸ‘­πŸ‘™'

# Import the necessary modules
from nltk.tokenize import regexp_tokenize

# Tokenize and print only emoji
emoji = "['\U0001F300-\U0001F5FF'|'\U0001F600-\U0001F64F'|'\U0001F680- 
 \U0001F6FF'|'\u2600-\u26FF\u2700-\u27BF']"

print(regexp_tokenize(a_list, emoji)) 

output :['πŸ™ˆ', '😌', 'πŸ’•', 'πŸ‘­', 'πŸ‘™']
-3

All the Unicode emojis with their respective code points are here. They are 1F600 to 1F64F, so you can just build all of them with a range-like iterator.

  • 1
    That's only one particular range of emoji. There are a lot more. – user2357112 Apr 1 '17 at 4:17

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