9

A few months ago I was interviewing for a job inside the company I am currently in, I dont have a strong web development background, but one of the questions he posed to me was how could you improve this block of code.

I dont remember the code block perfectly but to sum it up it was a web hit counter, and he used lock on the hitcounter.

lock(HitCounter)
{
   // Bla...
}

However after some discussion he said, lock is good but never use it in web applications!

What is the basis behind his statement? Why shouldnt I use lock in web applications?

2
  • 5
    Web apps aren't particularly special, except perhaps that they often need to be highly concurrent. You should use lock whenever it's necessary -- no more, no less -- regardless of the type of application.
    – LukeH
    Nov 30, 2010 at 14:31
  • Is HitCounter a class or an instance? Nov 27, 2012 at 23:01

7 Answers 7

7

There is no special reason why locks should not be used in web applications. However, they should be used carefully as they are a mechanism to serialize multi-threaded access which can cause blocking if lock blocks are contended. This is not just a concern for web applications though.

What is always worth remembering is that on modern hardware an uncontended lock takes 20 nanoseconds to flip. With this in mind, the usual practice of trying to make code inside of lock blocks as minimal as possible should be followed. If you have minimal code within a block, the overhead is quite small and potential for contention low.

To say that locks should never be used is a bit of a blanket statement really. It really depends on what your requirements are e.g. a thread-safe in-memory cache to be shared between requests will potentially result in less request blocking than on-demand fetching from a database.

Finally, BCL and ASP.Net Framework types certainly use locks internally, so you're indirectly using them anyway.

3
  • FYI, I've decided to use lock to ensure only 1 object can be created with the same unique data and so I don't get db errors when I try. I found I had to do this in the mutl-threaded environment of IIS when the site first loads. To make it work I declared the locking object outside the method as static so it would be accessible globally. Time will tell if this was a good decision or not but it has solved my problem (for now :)
    – Guy Lowe
    May 28, 2018 at 6:37
  • @GuyLowe I'm assuming it was fine...?
    – Luke
    Mar 2 at 9:04
  • 1
    @luke from memory yes all good.
    – Guy Lowe
    Mar 4 at 9:36
6

The application domain might be recycled.

This might result in the old appdomain still finishing serving some requests and the new appdomain also serving new requests.

Static variables are not shared between them, so locking on a static global would not grant exclusivity in this case.

1
  • Could you explain application domain recycling in further detail, please? Jun 11, 2019 at 14:29
3

First of all, you never want to lock an object that you actually use in any application. You want to create a lock object and lock that:

private readonly object _hitCounterLock = new object();
lock(_hitCounterLock)
{
    //blah
}

As for the web portion of the question, when you lock you block every thread that attempts to access the object (which for the web could be hundreds or thousands of users). They will all be waiting until each thread ahead of them unlocks.

2
  • Secondly you should never lock on a reference that is not readonly.
    – Tim Lloyd
    Nov 30, 2010 at 15:12
  • 1
    It shouldn't ever be overwritten; if it does, then you could be locking a different object than was locked before, thus becoming non-threadsafe. Oct 3, 2018 at 16:40
2

Late :), but for future readers of this, an additional point:

If the application is run on a web farm, the ASP's running on multiple machines will not share the lock object

So this can only work if 1. No web farm has to be supported AND 2. ASP is configured (non-default) NOT to use parallel instances during recycle until old requests are served (as mentioned by Andras above)

0

This code will create a bottleneck for your application since all incoming request will have to wait at this point before the previous went out of the lock.

6
  • 1
    still, this is not specific to web apps, is it?
    – xtofl
    Nov 30, 2010 at 14:34
  • @xtofl - This is not specific to web apps, but the page is a point in a web app that every user will potentially access. Locks in other apps can be used sparingly, and in areas that are low-impact. Nov 30, 2010 at 14:35
  • 1
    It is specific to any application using separate threads to serve incoming request and where all thread would pass trough this code. Web Apps are a good example of such. Is it ?
    – VdesmedT
    Nov 30, 2010 at 14:38
  • Locks are typically used in client applications for synchronizing non-UI threads. For web applications this kind of parallelization is seldom needed unless you're trying to take advantage of multiple cores -- because requests are parallelized on a per-thread basis already. Nov 30, 2010 at 14:43
  • @VdesmedT But what if the lock is around an in-memory cache that actually improves performance over a previous fetch on-demand DB implementation?
    – Tim Lloyd
    Nov 30, 2010 at 15:27
0

lock is only intended to be used for multithreaded applications where multiple threads require access to the same shared variable, thus a lock is exclusively acquired by the requesting thread and all pending threads will block and wait until the lock is released.

in web applications, user requests are isolated so there is no need for locking by default

3
  • Web Apps are definitely multi thread apps to allow multiple request to be served simultaneously.
    – VdesmedT
    Nov 30, 2010 at 14:40
  • looks like you did not pick up the point. i said requests are isolated from each other meaning that in the normal case there is no locking needed unless using shared or application wide scope variables. Nov 30, 2010 at 17:12
  • Yeah, I dunno why people are having trouble with that concept. People seem to think that "don't use locks on web apps" means "locks on web apps are evil". The point is that you should almost never have a reason to use locks to begin with. My similar answer got voted down too. Dec 2, 2010 at 6:42
0

Couple reasons...

  1. If you're trying to lock a database read/write operation, there's a really high risk of a race condition happening anyway because the database isn't owned by the process doing the lock, so it could be read from/written to by another process -- perhaps even a hypothetical future version of IIS that runs multiple processes per application.

  2. Locks are typically used in client applications for non-UI threads, i.e. background/worker threads. Web applications don't have as much of a use for multithreaded processing unless you're trying to take advantage of multiple cores (in which case locks on request-associated objects would be acceptable), because each request can be assumed to run on its own thread, and the server can't respond until it's processed the entire output (or at least a sequential chunk) anyway.

3
  • Point 1 could apply to any application domain, not just web applications, and anyway you would use a transaction here.
    – Tim Lloyd
    Nov 30, 2010 at 15:10
  • Point 2 Locks are not domain specific, so there is no "typical" application type usage.
    – Tim Lloyd
    Nov 30, 2010 at 15:12
  • 1. You're missing the point. Databases typically live in separate processes. You could use a transaction, yes, but that's another reason you wouldn't use a lock. 2. You're missing the point here too. In a desktop application the client thread needs to be responsive, so heavy operations are done asynchronously. That's not the case with web applications, except when you're in a situation where IO and CPU can work separately -- in which case you wouldn't be using a lock anyway. At least, not directly. Dec 1, 2010 at 0:01

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