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What is the fastest way to verify that the key of a data.table is unique? Is there a faster or more idiomatic way than

has_unique_key <- function(.data){
  uniqueN(.data, by = key(.data)) == nrow(.data)
}

To avoid overhead performance costs, the function can assume .data is a data.table and has a key. I'm more interested in the performance in verifying .data has a unique key; if the key is not unique, speed is less important.

The vignette Keys and fast binary search based subset notes that key uniqueness is not enforced:

  1. Uniqueness is not enforced, i.e., duplicate key values are allowed. Since rows are sorted by key, any duplicates in the key columns will appear consecutively.

but I haven't found anything that shows a data.table is aware or not its key is unique.

Unique key

set.seed(1)
z <- sample(1:1e5)
DT <- data.table(z = z) 
setkey(DT, z)
DT[, a := sample(letters, nrow(DT), replace = TRUE)]
DT[, b := rnorm(.N)]

microbenchmark(nrow(DT) == nrow(unique(DT, by = key(DT))),
               uniqueN(DT[, key(DT), with=F]) == nrow(DT),
               uniqueN(DT, by = key(DT)) == nrow(DT))

Unit: microseconds
                                         expr      min       lq     mean   median       uq      max neval cld
   nrow(DT) == nrow(unique(DT, by = key(DT))) 1731.766 2786.937 3678.377 3152.114 3870.119 9875.277   100   c
 uniqueN(DT[, key(DT), with = F]) == nrow(DT)  777.637 1113.149 1543.786 1276.236 1614.307 3809.281   100  b 
        uniqueN(DT, by = key(DT)) == nrow(DT)  541.515  734.570 1123.801  825.826 1756.612 2356.406   100 a  

Not unique

set.seed(1)
z <- c(1e5, sample(1:1e5))
DT <- data.table(z = z) 
setkey(DT, z)
DT[, a := sample(letters, nrow(DT), replace = TRUE)]
DT[, b := rnorm(.N)]

microbenchmark(nrow(DT) == nrow(unique(DT, by = key(DT))),
               uniqueN(DT[, key(DT), with=F]) == nrow(DT),
               uniqueN(DT, by = key(DT)) == nrow(DT))

Unit: microseconds
                                         expr      min       lq     mean   median       uq       max neval cld
   nrow(DT) == nrow(unique(DT, by = key(DT))) 2925.026 4051.878 5340.941 4535.266 5464.095 12479.852   100   c
 uniqueN(DT[, key(DT), with = F]) == nrow(DT) 1148.688 1515.972 1875.423 1670.627 1981.892  4843.822   100  b 
        uniqueN(DT, by = key(DT)) == nrow(DT)  857.450 1018.580 1332.697 1099.746 1301.685  3470.156   100 a  
  • Maybe also the base R anyDuplicated. This function is optimized a bit. There is also a method that works on data.table. These will conceptually be faster than the full vector scans in the case of many duplicates or duplicates occurring at the beginning (top) of the vector or data.table as they should short circuit when a duplicate is found. – lmo Apr 1 '17 at 13:04
  • The first way in the benchmark is trivially awful and can safely be ignored. If DT has a lot of non-key columns, all of them stick around in unique(DT, ...). The others are I guess all the same-ish, including DT[, uniqueN(.SD) == .N, .SDcols=key(DT)]. Personally, I use the much slower DT[, .N, by=key(DT)][N > 0, .N == 0L] for easier diagnostics. – Frank Apr 1 '17 at 15:23
0

To identify if a suspected composite key is unique Just test nrow() of group_by returns SAME nrow() as its input data frame

library(dplyr)
z <- data.frame(Repeated=sample(LETTERS[1:5], size=5, replace=TRUE),
                NOT_Repeated=sample(LETTERS[1:5], size=5, replace=FALSE))
z                                
test_unique <- z %>% group_by(Repeated) %>% summarise(Count=n_distinct(Repeated))
test_unique
nrow(z) == nrow(test_unique)

test_unique <- z %>% group_by(NOT_Repeated) %>% summarise(Count=n_distinct(NOT_Repeated))
test_unique
nrow(z) == nrow(test_unique)

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