13

I have a problem with a script timing out while fetching data form a query on large table.

The table have 9,521,457 rows.

The query I'm trying to preform is:

SELECT * 
FROM `dialhistory` 
WHERE `customerId` IN (22606536, 22707251, 41598836);

This query runs without problems on HeidiSQL and take about 171 seconds and returns 434 rows.

But when I run my C# script dose it timeout after 161 rows.

16:54:55: Row 1
...
16:54:55: Row 161
16:55:32: Error -> Timeout expired.  The timeout period elapsed prior to completion of the operation or the server is not responding.

Here is the code

public MySqlDatabase(string server, string database, string username, string password)
{
    ConnectionString = "SERVER=" + server + ";DATABASE=" + database + ";UID=" + username + ";PASSWORD=" + password + ";";

}

public IQueryable<DailHistory> GetHistory(IList<int> customerIds)
{
    IList<DailHistory> list = new List<DailHistory>();
    var connection = new MySqlConnection(ConnectionString);
    connection.Open();
    var command = connection.CreateCommand();
    command.CommandText = "SELECT * FROM `dialhistory` WHERE `customerId` in ("+string.Join(",", customerIds.ToArray())+")";
    var reader = command.ExecuteReader();
    int i = 1;
    while (reader.Read())
    {
        Console.WriteLine(DateTime.Now.ToLongTimeString() + ": Row " + i);
        i++;
        try
        {
            var d = new DailHistory();
            d.CustomerId = int.Parse((string) reader["customerId"]);
            d.Agent = ParseNullAbleString(reader["agent"].ToString());
            d.CallBackReason = ParseNullAbleString(reader["callBackReason"].ToString());
            d.CallState = ParseCallSate(reader["callState"].ToString());
            d.ContactResponse = ParseNullAbleString(reader["contactResponse"].ToString());
            d.DailTime = new DailTime(reader["dialStart"].ToString(), reader["dialEnd"].ToString());
            d.HistoryIndex = int.Parse(reader["historyIndex"].ToString());
            d.Note = ParseNullAbleString(reader["note"].ToString());
            d.OldDialNo = ParseNullAbleInt(reader["oldDialNo"].ToString());
            d.ProjectJob = ParseNullAbleString(reader["projectJob"].ToString());
            list.Add(d);
        }
        catch(Exception e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(e.Message);
        }
    }
    reader.Close();
    return list.AsQueryable();
}
30
command.CommandTimeout = int.MaxValue;

If you know more exactly which number to insert, do that. If you set it to int.MaxValue, you are removing a security barrier.

12

Set the CommandTimeout on the command object

var command = connection.CreateCommand();
command.CommandTimeout = 0;
//zero specifies never timeout. 
//Any number greater than zero is the number of seconds before 
//the command will time out.
  • command.CommandTimeout = 0; did not work :( it still timed out – Androme Nov 30 '10 at 16:20
  • 1
    @DoomStone Your database can have a timeout defined, when you request the timeout using commandTimeout this can be overriden by database configuration. In my case it worked for me, but in your case it might be an issue you need to work out with your DBA.. (for future readers.. obviously your issue was years ago sorry) – Chris Dec 18 '13 at 19:50
2

Add an index on the customerId column.

  • There are, it is the primary key! – Androme Nov 30 '10 at 16:04
  • 1
    @DoomStone - I don't see how it can possibly take 171 secs to return 434 rows then. Are you returning some extremely wide data (e.g. BLOBs) And CustomerId can't be the PK on its own anyway if 3 customerids return 434 rows. What are the other columns in the index and what is the order of these columns in the composite index? – Martin Smith Nov 30 '10 at 16:06
  • 1
    Did you mean this was the primary key for another table? If it were the primary key on this table then you should not be getting 434 rows returned from your query. – whudson05 Oct 28 '11 at 12:34
0
command.CommandTimeout = 2147483;

The largest value for a MySQL command timeout is the largest value for a 32 bit integer, in milliseconds, 2147483647. But in C# the CommandTimeout property is in seconds, not milliseconds, so any higher than 2147483 will result in an exception.

Although this is not infinite, it is 24 days, 20 hours, 31 minutes, and 23 seconds, which would hopefully meet your need.

Setting the value to 0 did not work for me. The CommandTimeout property would not retain the value of 0 and kept auto-changing back to 30.

Setting the value to -1 did seem to work, but I didn't test it enough to be certain that a timeout would never occur.

Safest option: go with 2147483.

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