195

In TypeScript, 2.2...

Let's say I have a Person type:

interface Person {
  name: string;
  hometown: string;
  nickname: string;
}

And I'd like to create a function that returns a Person, but doesn't require a nickname:

function makePerson(input: ???): Person {
  return {...input, nickname: input.nickname || input.name};
}

What should be the type of input? I'm looking for a dynamic way to specify a type that is identical to Person except that nickname is optional (nickname?: string | undefined). The closest thing I've figured out so far is this:

type MakePersonInput = Partial<Person> & {
  name: string;
  hometown: string;
}

but that's not quite what I'm looking for, since I have to specify all the types that are required instead of the ones that are optional.

1
  • be aware, most of the answers (if not all till this date), loses information on the union type, as in this type Description = { id: string } & ({ type: "hooman"; iq: number } | { type: "meow"; fur: "average" | "less" }); let a: Omit<Description, "id"> = { type: "hooman", iq: -200, };
    – Valen
    Aug 9, 2022 at 16:53

10 Answers 10

291

You can also do something like this, partial only some of the keys.

type Omit<T, K extends keyof T> = Pick<T, Exclude<keyof T, K>>
type PartialBy<T, K extends keyof T> = Omit<T, K> & Partial<Pick<T, K>>

interface Person {
  name: string;
  hometown: string;
  nickname: string;
}

type MakePersonInput = PartialBy<Person, 'nickname'>
7
  • 12
    This is awesome! Note you can pass more than one property: type OnlyNameIsMandatory = PartialBy<Person, 'nickname'|'hometown'>
    – epere4
    Apr 25, 2019 at 12:02
  • 69
    A quick note, the Omit helper type is now available by default in TypeScript 3.5+. So if you are using TS 3.5 or above you no longer need to define Omit yourself. Jul 24, 2019 at 2:57
  • what if I also want to add some extra properties to MakePersonInput?
    – Thanos M
    Apr 6, 2020 at 14:39
  • 2
    @ThanosM you can use interface PersonExtended extends MakePersonInput { some_prop: string; } or intersection type type MakePersonInput = PartialBy<Person, 'nickname'> & {some_prop: string}
    – Brachacz
    Jan 28, 2021 at 12:47
  • 12
    Pick<T,K> actually doesn't seem to be necessary: Omit<T, K> & Partial<T> gets the job done as well. Mar 24, 2021 at 22:54
202

Here is my Typescript 3.5+ Optional utility type

type Optional<T, K extends keyof T> = Pick<Partial<T>, K> & Omit<T, K>;

// and your use case
type MakePersonInput = Optional<Person, 'nickname'>

// and if you wanted to make the hometown optional as well
type MakePersonInput = Optional<Person, 'hometown' | 'nickname'>
9
  • 8
    This is beautyful! Feb 23, 2022 at 3:38
  • 1
    Awesome! Would you mind to explain the logic behind it? Jun 9, 2022 at 16:53
  • 3
    Sure! Optional takes two arguments, T is the type we want to base our optional type, and K represents a set of keys that are available on the type T. Partial<T> returns a type with all of the keys in T marked as optional. Surrounding the Partial<T> with a Pick<...,K> gives us a type with only the keys that we supplied, which we have already made optional. Using Omit<T,K> gives us a type without any of the keys that we have specified. By using an &, it will union the two types together.
    – Tim Krins
    Jun 10, 2022 at 9:42
  • Mulling it over more, there might be a shorter way of accomplishing the same thing - but feels cleaner in my mind building two types with no overlapping keys and merging them together.
    – Tim Krins
    Jun 10, 2022 at 9:45
  • in that case there is: type Optional<T, K extends keyof T> = Pick<T, Exclude<keyof T, K>> & Pick<Partial<T>, K>
    – alfred
    Feb 10, 2023 at 4:25
45

For a plug and play solution, consider using the brilliant utility-types package:

npm i utility-types --save

Then simply make use of Optional<T, K>:

import { Optional } from 'utility-types';

type Person = {
  name: string;
  hometown: string;
  nickname: string;
}

type PersonWithOptionalNickname = Optional<Person, 'nickname'>;

// Expect:
//
// type PersonWithOptionalNickname {
//   name: string;
//   hometown: string;
//   nickname?: string;
// }
0
21

Update:

As of TypeScript 2.8, this is supported much more concisely by Conditional Types! So far, this also seems to be more reliable than previous implementations.

type Overwrite<T1, T2> = {
    [P in Exclude<keyof T1, keyof T2>]: T1[P]
} & T2;

interface Person {
  name: string;
  hometown: string;
  nickname: string;
}

type MakePersonInput = Overwrite<Person, {
  nickname?: string;
}>

function makePerson(input: MakePersonInput): Person {
  return {...input, nickname: input.nickname || input.name};
}

As before, MakePersonInput is equivalent to:

type MakePersonInput = {
    name: string;
    hometown: string;
} & {
    nickname?: string;
}

Outdated:

As of TypeScript 2.4.1, it looks like there's another option available, as proposed by GitHub user ahejlsberg in a thread on type subtraction: https://github.com/Microsoft/TypeScript/issues/12215#issuecomment-307871458

type Diff<T extends string, U extends string> = ({ [P in T]: P } & { [P in U]: never } & { [x: string]: never })[T];
type Overwrite<T, U> = { [P in Diff<keyof T, keyof U>]: T[P] } & U;

interface Person {
  name: string;
  hometown: string;
  nickname: string;
}
type MakePersonInput = Overwrite<Person, {
  nickname?: string
}>
function makePerson(input: MakePersonInput): Person {
  return {...input, nickname: input.nickname || input.name};
}

According to Intellisense, MakePersonInput is equivalent to:

type MakePersonInput = {
    name: string;
    hometown: string;
} & {
    nickname?: string;
}

which looks a little funny but absolutely gets the job done.

On the downside, I'm gonna need to stare at that Diff type for a while before I start to understand how it works.

2
  • 2
    Note that this makes any optional fields in the original interface required
    – joshhunt
    Jun 26, 2018 at 3:07
  • 11
    use this to keep optional fields - type Overwrite<T1, T2> = Pick<T1, Exclude<keyof T1, keyof T2>> & T2;
    – andrey
    Aug 13, 2018 at 21:10
13

The type-fest package has a utility SetOptional - https://github.com/sindresorhus/type-fest/blob/main/source/set-optional.d.ts

import { SetOptional } from 'type-fest';

type PersonWithNicknameOptional = SetOptional<Person, 'nickname'>

I find the library is well-maintained, and supports latest versions of typescript. It's worth adding in a typescript project IMO.

13

If you use a recent version of typescript, a simple solution is to do

function makePerson(input: Omit<Person, 'nickname'> & { nickname?: string }): Person {
  return {...input, nickname: input.nickname || input.name};
}

Basically you remove the "nickname" property from the interface and re-add it as optional

If you want to make sure to keep it in sync with the original interface you can do

Omit<Person, 'nickname'> & Partial<Pick<Person, 'nickname'>>

which will warn you if you ever change the "nickname" prop in the original interface

0

Ok well what you are really describing is two different "Types" of people (i.e. Person types) .. A normal person and a nick named person.

interface Person {
    name: string;
    hometown: string;
}

interface NicknamedPerson extends Person {
    nickname: string;
}

Then in the case where you don't really want a nicknamed person but just a person you just implement the Person interface.

An alternative way to do this if you wanted to hang on to just one Person interface is having a different implementation for a non nicknamed person:

interface Person {
  name: string;
  hometown: string;
  nickname: string;
}
class NicknamedPerson implements Person {
    constructor(public name: string, public hometown: string, public nickname: string) {}
}

class RegularPerson implements Person {
    nickname: string;
    constructor(public name: string, public hometown: string) {
        this.nickname = name;
    }
}

makePerson(input): Person {
     if(input.nickname != null) {
       return new NicknamedPerson(input.name, input.hometown, input.nickname);
     } else {
       return new RegularPerson(input.name, input.hometown);
     }
}

This enables you to still assign a nickname (which is just the persons name in case of an absence of a nickname) and still uphold the Person interface's contract. It really has more to do with how you intend on using the interface. Does the code care about the person having a nickname? If not, then the first proposal is probably better.

3
  • Hi... so... this is a great response to the question I asked, but not so much for what I'm actually trying to solve :/ Sorry for the oversimplification of the question. In the terms of what I asked... basically, every Person must have a nickname, but I don't want this function to require it. If it's not provided, it'll just use the name input.
    – DallonF
    Apr 1, 2017 at 20:42
  • I edited my answer to better illustrate the second option I was advocating. Let me know if we still aren't on the same page? Notice that the RegularPerson constructor makes the "nickname" value equal to the "name" value of input. Apr 1, 2017 at 21:45
  • input here is still missing a type, which is the tricky part of this question... I think what I'm trying to do just isn't possible in TypeScript yet. I think I'm going to self-answer with what I found.
    – DallonF
    Apr 2, 2017 at 13:49
0

After a lot of digging, I think what I'm trying to do just isn't possible in TypeScript... yet. When spread/rest types land, I think it will be, though, with syntax something along the lines of { ...Person, nickname?: string }.

For now, I've gone with a more verbose approach, declaring the properties that are required:

type MakePersonInput = Partial<Person> & {
  name: string;
  hometown: string;
};
function makePerson(input: MakePersonInput): Person {
  return {...input, nickname: input.nickname || input.name};
}

This unfortunately requires me to update MakePersonInput whenever I add more required properties to Person, but it's impossible to forget to do this, because it will cause a type error in makePerson.

0
export type Optional<T, K extends keyof T> = Omit<T, K> & { [P in keyof T]?: T[P] | undefined; }

If you want to cover the case when the key is not passed at all, or it is passed but with value set to undefined

-3

I reformatted your code to this:

interface Person {
  name: string;
  hometown: string;
  nickname?: string;
}

TypeScript 5. The question mark "?" denotes an optional property or method in an interface or class.

In the code I provided, the "nickname" property is marked with a question mark, which means that it's optional. It indicates that instances of the Person interface may or may not have a nickname property.

If a Person object has a nickname property, it must be a string type. However, if it doesn't have a nickname property, it won't cause a compilation error. This makes it possible to define objects that conform to the Person interface with or without a nickname property.

1
  • 1
    that does not help to answer the question asked. Noone wants to rewrite manually the type definition with optional property, the question was about how to transfer a type to another type in a functional manner.
    – grenobnik
    Jul 7, 2023 at 12:22

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