132

I have bash script like the following:

#!/bin/bash

echo "Please enter your username";
read username;

echo "Please enter your password";
read password;

I want that when the user types the password on the terminal, it should not be displayed (or something like *******) should be displayed). How do I achieve this?

6
  • 2
    General note just to prevent confusion: this username/password has got nothing to do with the linux username/password - I am just looking for a way to hide the data that user types during "read password". – JP19 Nov 30 '10 at 17:46
  • I added an update for if you want to get fancy by outputting * while they type in the password – SiegeX Nov 30 '10 at 18:09
  • Thanks much. One question if someone knows - will this automatically prevent it from going into .bash_history? – JP19 Nov 30 '10 at 19:09
  • 2
  • 2
    I don't think it will, bash_history only captures your command, what happens after running your command it doesn't capture. – Andreas Wong Dec 1 '10 at 1:11
299

Just supply -s to your read call like so:

$ read -s PASSWORD
$ echo $PASSWORD
8
  • 10
    I like this way better. I would vote you up If I didn't hit my daily limit – SiegeX Nov 30 '10 at 17:53
  • 5
    To provide context: -s displays nothing while the input is typed. (-s is a non-POSIX extension, so not all shells support it, such as the ash shell that comes with BusyBox; use the ssty -echo approach in such shells) – mklement0 Apr 8 '14 at 13:30
  • 4
    @electron Nothing in the man page actually suggests that -s sets the text color to the same as the the background color. It just "echoes silently". ss64.com/bash/read.html Silent mode. If input is coming from a terminal, characters are not echoed. – Andreas Wong Oct 7 '15 at 3:45
  • 2
    @electron I tested on my box, not only it doesn't move the cursor, when I try to highlight the line where I typed in my password, I can't seem to paste it later. Both should happen if what the book says is true. I'm guessing maybe a different flavor of shell (I was using bash 4.1.2(1)). – Andreas Wong Oct 8 '15 at 2:46
  • 1
    @DominykasMostauskis yeah but the label is for bash, therefore the solution. There are probably tons of shell variants where this don't work :) – Andreas Wong Jul 3 '18 at 10:27
26

Update

In case you want to get fancy by outputting an * for each character they type, you can do something like this (using andreas' read -s solution):

unset password;
while IFS= read -r -s -n1 pass; do
  if [[ -z $pass ]]; then
     echo
     break
  else
     echo -n '*'
     password+=$pass
  fi
done

Without being fancy

echo "Please enter your username";
read username;

echo "Please enter your password";
stty -echo
read password;
stty echo
12
  • It should be IFS=$'\n' so that you can actually finish typing the password. Otherwise nice; very clever. – sorpigal Nov 30 '10 at 18:21
  • 2
    No need to set IFS=$'\n' because read's default delimiter is -d $'\n'. The if-statement to break on a nul string, which happens on a newline, is what allows them to finish the password. – SiegeX Nov 30 '10 at 18:25
  • In testing on FreeBSD with bash 3.x I find this not to be the case. Testing on Linux with 3.1.17 yields your results. I haven't got a BSD box handy at the moment but I will try to confirm this tomorrow, just for my own curiosity's sake. – sorpigal Nov 30 '10 at 21:14
  • @Sorpigal: interesting, let me know what you find out. I'm all about portability – SiegeX Nov 30 '10 at 23:39
  • 2
    I've got it. My FreeBSD test was based on the code copied and pasted from your original mistaken edit of lesmana's post, which contains one important difference: you had been passing read a -d ''. When I retried it later on Linux I used the reposted version. If I try omitting -d '' of course it works identically on FreeBSD! I am actually quite relieved that there isn't some mysterious platform magic at work here. – sorpigal Dec 1 '10 at 17:14
18

for a solution that works without bash or certain features from read you can use stty to disable echo

stty_orig=$(stty -g)
stty -echo
read password
stty $stty_orig
0
11

Here's a variation on @SiegeX's excellent *-printing solution for bash with support for backspace added; this allows the user to correct their entry with the backspace key (delete key on a Mac), as is typically supported by password prompts:

#!/usr/bin/env bash

password=''
while IFS= read -r -s -n1 char; do
  [[ -z $char ]] && { printf '\n'; break; } # ENTER pressed; output \n and break.
  if [[ $char == $'\x7f' ]]; then # backspace was pressed
      # Remove last char from output variable.
      [[ -n $password ]] && password=${password%?}
      # Erase '*' to the left.
      printf '\b \b' 
  else
    # Add typed char to output variable.
    password+=$char
    # Print '*' in its stead.
    printf '*'
  fi
done

Note:

  • As for why pressing backspace records character code 0x7f: "In modern systems, the backspace key is often mapped to the delete character (0x7f in ASCII or Unicode)" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Backspace
  • \b \b is needed to give the appearance of deleting the character to the left; just using \b moves the cursor to the left, but leaves the character intact (nondestructive backspace). By printing a space and moving back again, the character appears to have been erased (thanks, The "backspace" escape character '\b' in C, unexpected behavior?).

In a POSIX-only shell (e.g., sh on Debian and Ubuntu, where sh is dash), use the stty -echo approach (which is suboptimal, because it prints nothing), because the read builtin will not support the -s and -n options.

1
  • Thanks, @Dylan. I just realized that the code for removing the last character from the password typed so far can be simplified - see update. – mklement0 Sep 21 '14 at 3:43
4

A bit different from (but mostly like) @lesmana's answer

stty -echo
read password
stty echo

simply: hide echo do your stuff show echo

1
  • Can you explain why this is better than @lesmana's answer? I see it's simpler with less overhead for another stty call, and one less variable on the stack - only taking away echo and only restoring echo. Is there any possible way this could upset other stty settings? Lesmana's preserves all settings. – Jeff Puckett May 30 '16 at 19:21
2

Here is a variation of @SiegeX's answer which works with traditional Bourne shell (which has no support for += assignments).

password=''
while IFS= read -r -s -n1 pass; do
  if [ -z "$pass" ]; then
     echo
     break
  else
     printf '*'
     password="$password$pass"
  fi
done
2
  • A traditional Bourne shell (or a POSIX-compliant one) would also not recognize [[ ... ]], nor would its read builtin have the -s and -n options. Your code will therefore not work in dash, for instance. (It will work on platforms where sh is actually bash, such as on OSX, where bash when invoked as sh merely modifies a few default options while still supporting most bashisms.) – mklement0 Apr 8 '14 at 12:48
  • 2
    Thanks for feedback, switched to single [ but obviously not much I can do if your read lacks these options. – tripleee Apr 8 '14 at 14:05
2

I always like to use Ansi escape characters:

echo -e "Enter your password: \x1B[8m"
echo -e "\x1B[0m"

8m makes text invisible and 0m resets text to "normal." The -e makes Ansi escapes possible.

The only caveat is that you can still copy and paste the text that is there, so you probably shouldn't use this if you really want security.

It just lets people not look at your passwords when you type them in. Just don't leave your computer on afterwards. :)


NOTE:

The above is platform independent as long as it supports Ansi escape sequences.

However, for another Unix solution, you could simply tell read to not echo the characters...

printf "password: "
let pass $(read -s)
printf "\nhey everyone, the password the user just entered is $pass\n"
1

Get Username and password

Make it more clear to read but put it on a better position over the screen

#!/bin/bash
clear
echo 
echo 
echo
counter=0
unset username
prompt="  Enter Username:"
while IFS= read -p "$prompt" -r -s -n 1 char
do
    if [[ $char == $'\0' ]]; then
        break
    elif [ $char == $'\x08' ] && [ $counter -gt 0 ]; then
        prompt=$'\b \b'
        username="${username%?}"
        counter=$((counter-1))
    elif [ $char == $'\x08' ] && [ $counter -lt 1 ]; then
        prompt=''
        continue
    else
        counter=$((counter+1))
        prompt="$char"
        username+="$char"
    fi
done
echo
unset password
prompt="  Enter Password:"
while IFS= read -p "$prompt" -r -s -n 1 char
do
    if [[ $char == $'\0' ]]; then
        break
    elif [ $char == $'\x08' ] && [ $counter -gt 0 ]; then
        prompt=$'\b \b'
        password="${password%?}"
        counter=$((counter-1))
    elif [ $char == $'\x08' ] && [ $counter -lt 1 ]; then
        echo
        prompt="  Enter Password:"
        continue
    else
        counter=$((counter+1))
        prompt='*'
        password+="$char"
    fi
done
1

A variation on both @SiegeX and @mklement0's excellent contributions: mask user input; handle backspacing; but only backspace for the length of what the user has input (so we're not wiping out other characters on the same line) and handle control characters, etc... This solution was found here after so much digging!

#!/bin/bash
#
# Read and echo a password, echoing responsive 'stars' for input characters
# Also handles: backspaces, deleted and ^U (kill-line) control-chars
#
unset PWORD
PWORD=
echo -n 'password: ' 1>&2
while true; do
  IFS= read -r -N1 -s char
  # Note a NULL will return a empty string
  # Convert users key press to hexadecimal character code
  code=$(printf '%02x' "'$char") # EOL (empty char) -> 00
  case "$code" in
  ''|0a|0d) break ;;   # Exit EOF, Linefeed or Return
  08|7f)  # backspace or delete
      if [ -n "$PWORD" ]; then
        PWORD="$( echo "$PWORD" | sed 's/.$//' )"
        echo -n $'\b \b' 1>&2
      fi
      ;;
  15) # ^U or kill line
      echo -n "$PWORD" | sed 's/./\cH \cH/g' >&2
      PWORD=''
      ;;
  [01]?) ;;                        # Ignore ALL other control characters
  *)  PWORD="$PWORD$char"
      echo -n '*' 1>&2
      ;;
  esac
done
echo
echo $PWORD

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