124

How do I get a Windows batch script to wait a few seconds?

sleep and wait don't seem to work (unrecognized command).

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12 Answers 12

178

You can try

ping -n XXX 127.0.0.1 >nul

where XXX is the number of seconds to wait, plus one.

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  • 3
    Clay Calvert provides an explanation of this technique. Note that -n is used to indicate the number of requests. ping waits one second by default for each reply even if it arrives in less time. – Jaime Soto Nov 30 '10 at 18:27
  • remember you need to add one to the number of seconds, because ping doesn't wait before the first request. – lunixbochs Mar 21 '11 at 9:55
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    Haha, so simple and yet so genius :-) Exactly what I was looking for. +1 – Simon Apr 13 '12 at 21:19
  • Only thing I could find that worked on plain XP. – Jesse Glick Mar 14 '13 at 16:19
  • I ran into a funny issue using this method when I needed a script to automatically release the computer's IP address, wait a few minutes while I reconfigured a switch port, and then renew the IP address. During the intervening moments that the switch port was down, the network connection was lost and ping errored out with a hardware error message, and ran through the supposedly 1-second long pings in a fraction of the expected time. – Wes Larson Jan 28 '16 at 23:16
163

I don't know why those commands are not working for you, but you can also try timeout

timeout <delay in seconds>
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  • i have plain windows XP install. i think "sleep" is an addition you have to install. timeout works great, though, thanks! – Claudiu Nov 30 '10 at 18:21
  • Ooh! I didn't know about timeout. Unfortunately it isn't available in Windows 2000, although that probably isn't a problem nowadays. If it is, choice will work on previous versions too (even in DOS). – GolezTrol Nov 30 '10 at 18:23
  • I haven't used this command - I just found it in ss64. You may also want to take a look at lukuluku's solution. – Jaime Soto Nov 30 '10 at 18:32
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    this works in Windows 7 – James Gardner May 20 '13 at 8:16
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160
timeout /t 10 /nobreak > NUL

/t specifies the time to wait in seconds

/nobreak won't interrupt the timeout if you press a key (except CTRL-C)

> NUL will suppress the output of the command

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  • 8
    Holy crap! I had no idea this was there. SO needs to sort these answers by rating. I almost missed this. – RandomInsano Dec 18 '12 at 18:00
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    This is what I have been looking for and couldn't find anywhere. +1 – Registered User Dec 27 '12 at 6:04
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    The TIMEOUT command does not work on Windows XP; it was introduced in Windows Vista.. – Peter Mortensen Jul 24 '13 at 8:10
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    On my XP machine here i have it. @PeterMortensen Did it got in via update? – Riscie Aug 21 '13 at 6:33
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    @Heberda /t Time to wait in seconds, /nobreak won't interrupt the timeout if you press a button (except CTRL-C), > NUL will suppress the output of the command – lukuluku Jan 11 '16 at 13:51
14

To wait 10 seconds:

choice /T 10 /C X /D X /N
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  • 1
    i'll use this with > NUL to suppress all output. – Claudiu Nov 30 '10 at 18:52
  • woah actually i have neither timeout nor choice on this install of xp i'm working with... really weird. ping it is. – Claudiu Nov 30 '10 at 18:55
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    The CHOICE command does not work on Windows XP; it was introduced in Windows 2003 and Windows Vista.. – Peter Mortensen Jul 24 '13 at 8:01
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    @PeterMortensen Turns out Choice is available for Windows XP but it is not installed by default. It wasn't introduced in Windows 2003, though, because it existed in earlier consumer versions (95, 98) of Windows and even in MSDOS 6.0. They probably just forgot about it when they combined the consumer versions with the NT versions starting with Windows 2000. ;-) – GolezTrol Jul 24 '13 at 9:13
13

Microsoft has a sleep function you can call directly.

    Usage:  sleep      time-to-sleep-in-seconds
            sleep [-m] time-to-sleep-in-milliseconds
            sleep [-c] commited-memory ratio (1%-100%)

You can just say sleep 1 for example to sleep for 1 second in your batch script.

IMO Ping is a bit of a hack for this use case.

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  • 10
    "C:\Documents and Settings\User>sleep 'sleep' is not recognized as an internal or external command, operable program or batch file." Windows is a bit of a hack for this use case.. lol – Claudiu Aug 4 '11 at 15:37
  • I could use 'sleep' on my machine (windows 7). – Rejeev Divakaran Jun 30 '12 at 16:52
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    PowerShell or plain cmd.exe? – RandomInsano Dec 18 '12 at 17:52
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    PowerShell indeed. Good catch @RandomInsano! – Domi Dec 9 '14 at 7:28
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    Confirmed - it is a POWER SHELL command, not regular command line (cmd.exe) – jave.web May 3 '15 at 21:14
6

For a pure cmd.exe script, you can use this piece of code that returns the current time in hundreths of seconds.

:gettime
set hh=%time:~0,2%
set mm=%time:~3,2%
set ss=%time:~6,2%
set cc=%time:~-2%
set /A %1=hh*360000+mm*6000+ss*100+cc
goto :eof

You may then use it in a wait loop like this.

:wait
call :gettime wait0
:w2
call :gettime wait1
set /A waitt = wait1-wait0
if !waitt! lss %1 goto :w2
goto :eof

And putting all pieces together:

@echo off
setlocal enableextensions enabledelayedexpansion

call :gettime t1
echo %t1%
call :wait %1
call :gettime t2
echo %t2%
set /A tt = (t2-t1)/100
echo %tt%
goto :eof

:wait
call :gettime wait0
:w2
call :gettime wait1
set /A waitt = wait1-wait0
if !waitt! lss %1 goto :w2
goto :eof

:gettime 
set hh=%time:~0,2%
set mm=%time:~3,2%
set ss=%time:~6,2%
set cc=%time:~-2%
set /A %1=hh*360000+mm*6000+ss*100+cc
goto :eof

For a more detailed description of the commands used here, check HELP SET and HELP CALL information.

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  • 4
    But that is a "busy wait" loop burning CPU time unnecessarily. Calling a command which waits is better in my opinion. Please consider this link at SO to find out more. In order to mitigate this in your script you could insert timeout x >nul after the :wait label (replace x by the number of seconds to wait) – Matt Oct 9 '15 at 9:11
4

The Windows 2003 Resource Kit has a sleep batch file. If you ever move up to PowerShell, you can use:

Start-Sleep -s <time to sleep>

Or something like that.

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  • ...or powershell -command "Start-Sleep -Milliseconds 5000">nul – Mister Henson Jun 21 '16 at 17:11
4

I rely on JScript. I have a JScript file like this:

// This is sleep.js
WScript.Sleep( WScript.Arguments( 0 ) );

And inside a batch file I run it with CScript (usually it is %SystemRoot%\system32\cscript.exe)

rem This is the calling inside a BAT file to wait for 5 seconds
cscript /nologo sleep.js 5000
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3

Heh, Windows is uhm... interesting. This works:

choice /T 1 /d y > NUL

choice presents a prompt asking you yes or no. /d y makes it choose yes. /t 1 makes it wait a second before typing it. > NUL squashes output.

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  • 7
    Yeah, but you need to have a Windows that asks Yes or No. On my Dutch Windows, it asks Ja or Nee, so the Y won't work. Thats why I specified the exact choices in my answer above. And you can just add /N to prevent the prompt to be displayed. – GolezTrol Nov 30 '10 at 18:38
  • @GolezTrol: still need the "> NUL" to supress the "X" from displaying. ah and I didn't realize the importance of "/C" , the example i found online had it – Claudiu Nov 30 '10 at 18:52
  • The CHOICE command does not work on Windows XP; it was introduced in Windows 2003 and Windows Vista.. – Peter Mortensen Jul 24 '13 at 8:02
2

I just wrote my own sleep which called the Win32 Sleep API function.

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  • 1
    /* Compile this with ms vc6, cl.exe Sleep.c, e.g. Sleep.exe 100 .. sleep for 100 ms */ #include <WinSock.h> int main(int argc, char *argv[]) { Sleep(argc<2?1000:atoi(argv[1])); return 0; } – mosh Sep 20 '16 at 6:57
1

RJLsoftware has a small utility called DelayExec.exe. With this you can execute a delayed start of any program in batches and Windows registry (most useful in ...Windows/.../Run registry).

Usage example:

delayexec "C:\WINDOWS\system32\notepad.exe" 10

or as a sleep command:

delayexec "nothing" 10
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1

Personally I use a Perl one-liner:

perl -e "sleep 10;"

for a 10-second wait. Chances are you'll already have Perl installed on a development machine as part of your git installation; if not you will have to install it, for example, from ActiveState or Strawberry, but it's one of those things I install anyway.

Alternatively, you can install a sleep command from GnuWin32.

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  • ah it isn't one of those things I install =P. i don't even want to install a "sleep.exe" utility, so this is a bit much. – Claudiu Nov 30 '10 at 18:19
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    Ruby would work too: ruby -e "sleep 10" -- and it's one character less :) – Roy Tinker Oct 18 '11 at 19:19
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    @Roy: Actually, perl can do without the semicolon. And if you can get away with 9 seconds instead of 10, it is even TWO characters less: perl -e "sleep 9" :-) – mivk Oct 31 '12 at 18:37
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    You can also use PHP like this: php -r sleep(5); – waza123 Jan 15 '16 at 17:33
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    Here's another interpreter: node -e "setTimeout(a=>{}, 500)" – weaknespase Jan 19 at 19:05

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