111

I am getting the following error when trying to create these entities.

TypeError: Class extends value undefined is not a function or null

I am assuming this has something to do with circular dependencies, but how is that supposed to be avoided when using table inheritance and one to many relationships?

It is complaining about the following javascript at BaseComic_1.BaseComic.

let Variant = class Variant extends BaseComic_1.BaseComic {

Here is the complete file.

"use strict";
var __decorate = (this && this.__decorate) || function (decorators, target, key, desc) {
    var c = arguments.length, r = c < 3 ? target : desc === null ? desc = Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptor(target, key) : desc, d;
    if (typeof Reflect === "object" && typeof Reflect.decorate === "function") r = Reflect.decorate(decorators, target, key, desc);
    else for (var i = decorators.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) if (d = decorators[i]) r = (c < 3 ? d(r) : c > 3 ? d(target, key, r) : d(target, key)) || r;
    return c > 3 && r && Object.defineProperty(target, key, r), r;
};
var __metadata = (this && this.__metadata) || function (k, v) {
    if (typeof Reflect === "object" && typeof Reflect.metadata === "function") return Reflect.metadata(k, v);
};
Object.defineProperty(exports, "__esModule", { value: true });
const typeorm_1 = require("typeorm");
const Comic_1 = require("./Comic");
const BaseComic_1 = require("./BaseComic");
let Variant = class Variant extends BaseComic_1.BaseComic {
};
__decorate([
    typeorm_1.ManyToOne(type => Comic_1.Comic, comic => comic.variants),
    __metadata("design:type", Comic_1.Comic)
], Variant.prototype, "comic", void 0);
Variant = __decorate([
    typeorm_1.ClassEntityChild()
], Variant);
exports.Variant = Variant;
//# sourceMappingURL=Variant.js.map

import {Entity, Column, PrimaryGeneratedColumn, OneToMany} from "typeorm";
import {Comic} from "./Comic";

@Entity()
export class Series {

    @PrimaryGeneratedColumn()
    public id: number;

    @Column("text", {
        length: 30
    })
    public copyright: string;

    @Column("text", {
        length: 100
    })
    public attributionText: string;

    @Column("text", {
        length: 150
    })
    public attributionHTML: string;

    @Column("text", {
        length: 50
    })
    public etag: string;

    @Column("text", {
        length: 200
    })
    public title: string;

    @Column("text")
    public description: string;

    @Column("number", {
        length: 4
    })
    public startYear: number;

    @Column("number", {
        length: 4
    })
    public endYear: number;

    @Column("text", {
        length: 20
    })
    public rating: string;

    @Column("text", {
        length: 20
    })
    public type: string;

    @Column("text")
    public thumbnail: string;

    @OneToMany(type => Comic, comic => comic.series)
    public comics: Array<Comic>;
}

import {Entity, TableInheritance, PrimaryGeneratedColumn, Column, ManyToOne, DiscriminatorColumn} from "typeorm";
import {Series} from "./Series";

@Entity()
@TableInheritance("class-table")
@DiscriminatorColumn({ name: "type", type: "string"})
export class BaseComic {

    @PrimaryGeneratedColumn()
    public id: number;

    @Column("text", {
        length: 30
    })
    public copyright: string;

    @Column("text", {
        length: 100
    })
    public attributionText: string;

    @Column("text", {
        length: 150
    })
    public attributionHTML: string;

    @Column("text", {
        length: 50
    })
    public etag: string;

    @Column("text", {
        length: 200
    })
    public title: string;

    @Column("int")
    public issue: number;

    @Column("text")
    public variantDescription: string;

    @Column("boolean")
    public variant: boolean;

    @Column("text")
    public description: string;

    @Column("int")
    public pageCount: number;

    @Column("date")
    public onSaleDate: Date;

    @Column("date")
    public unlimitedDate: Date;

    @Column("text")
    public thumbnail: string;

    @ManyToOne(type => Series, series => series.comics)
    public series: Series;
}

import {OneToMany, ClassEntityChild} from "typeorm";
import {Variant} from "./Variant";
import {BaseComic} from "./BaseComic";

@ClassEntityChild()
export class Comic extends BaseComic {

    @OneToMany(type => Variant, variant => variant.comic)
    public variants: Variant[];
}

import {ManyToOne, ClassEntityChild} from "typeorm";
import {Comic} from "./Comic";
import {BaseComic} from "./BaseComic";

@ClassEntityChild()
export class Variant extends BaseComic {

    @ManyToOne(type => Comic, comic => comic.variants)
    public comic: Comic;
}
168

I was having the same issue. It turns out I was circularly importing classes, which is apparently a limitation. (See these GitHub issues: #20361, #4149, #10712)

Note that it seems that the circular reference is also limited between files, not simply types.

See this other answer

8
  • 2
    I had a circular import issue with browserify. It was inconsistent and weird--modifying the file or commenting and removing things and rerunning would sometimes make it go away. Tricky. Jul 1 '17 at 17:19
  • 6
    Note that it seems that the circular reference is between files, not simply types. So even when your type references are not circular, you may still have this problem depending on the .ts files your types reside in.
    – barfuin
    Feb 11 '18 at 20:38
  • 2
    @JoshuaKing can you link to a resource regarding that "limitation" of cirtualr importing classes in typescript? Nov 28 '18 at 6:55
  • 2
    From my experience also the order of imports is important. I had a User entity und 2 other entities which had the same abstract class. The other 2 entities also imported the User and as long as the abstract class was the last import (mainly after user) everything was fine. As soon as i ordered the imports in another way the application broke. Jan 30 '19 at 7:57
  • 1
    @BrunoBieri it's not Typescript's limitation. This is a runtime error - the module resolver is unable to navigate it's way around the circular import. A good resource I've found is in You Don't Know JS.
    – gombosg
    Mar 6 '19 at 22:54
33

As noted in Thomas Jensen's comment above, circular references can occur not just in Types, but also in files. I encountered this same problem when I was exporting both the base and derived types from the same file. Such as:

// index.ts
export { BaseClass } from "./base";
export { DerivedClass } from "./derived";

This is an easy pitfall to fall into. Posting this here in the hopes it'll save someone else the debugging time.

3
  • so what is the best work around for this when you have an index file like this. where do you put the base files? Or is an index file kinda of an anti-pattern
    – Jonathan
    Aug 24 '19 at 21:11
  • I don't think index.ts files are an anti-pattern, I know some people disagree with that. I think they're a great way to provide a useful public interface to a module. From memory I ended up resolving this issue by refactoring to not require exporting the base class at all. Unfortunately I can't give you a better answer than that.
    – ajxs
    Aug 24 '19 at 23:47
  • 3
    there's something oddly poetic about "pitfall to fall into" in a post about circular references... :) Mar 1 at 2:40
15

Circular dependencies can be tricky to identify. Michael Weststrate has an interesting reading about circular dependencies and proposed a pattern to fix them.

Automated circular dependency detection.

On top of using a pattern that allows for scalability, you can make use of a super useful tool that with very little effort will identify circular dependencies for you, Madge.

Madge can be ran over .ts or .js files. I found that is useful to run it in both directories, as they might give different results due to the transpilation process.

For Typescript .ts files:

madge --circular --extensions ts <directory_path>

For Javascript .js files:

madge --circular <directory_path>
3
  • Thank you, it's amazing!
    – lescaudr
    Mar 8 at 18:13
  • Thank you for sharing this. Weirdly I got No circular dependency found! yet the thing still throws the same error. Though it doesn't solve my problem, I would have spent ages looking for a circular dependency if it weren't for this.
    – K-Dawg
    May 25 at 7:40
  • 2
    I want to put in good word for dpdm an alternative to Madge. In my code, Madge found 1 trivial circular dependency and wasn't helpful at all; dpdm, on the other hand, found 27 substantive circular paths. Recommended. Jun 10 at 20:06
2

Just ran into this issue and, well, it is strange. I am running the project as

node --require ts-node/register path/to/index.ts

And this failed with above error even after I removed circular references as suggested by accepted answer.

However, if I run tsc it compiles fine and then it runs fine even with --require ts-node/register....

Hope this helps someone.

1

I came here because when executing the code with jest, it threw this error. This is because when writing the moduleNameMapper for the jest.config.js the order of the elements in the object is essential.

There is a helper which imports the module-names from the ts-config.json:

// jest.config.js
const { pathsToModuleNameMapper } = require('ts-jest/utils');
// In the following statement, replace `./tsconfig` with the path to your `tsconfig` file
// which contains the path mapping (ie the `compilerOptions.paths` option):
const { compilerOptions } = require('./tsconfig');

module.exports = {
  // [...]
  moduleNameMapper: pathsToModuleNameMapper(compilerOptions.paths /*, { prefix: '<rootDir>/' } */ )
};

Taken from the official documentation of ts-jest

1
  • yes, I saw this error when I wasn't mocking things in jest properly - specifically, when mocking an entire module via __mocks__, all symbols used from there need to be mocked (or unmocked with requireActual, etc) Apr 2 at 21:21
0

I had the same problem because my editor auto-imported Entity from the wrong package.

Once I changed import { Entity } from 'typeorm/decorator/entity/Entity'; back to import { Entity } from 'typeorm'; the error message disappeared.

-1

The internal module pattern

try this example to solve circular dependency. details you can find Here

// -- app.js --
import { AbstractNode } from './internal'

/* as is */

// -- internal.js --
export * from './AbstractNode'
export * from './Node'
export * from './Leaf'

// -- AbstractNode.js --
import { Node, Leaf } from './internal'

export class AbstractNode {
   /* as is */
}

// -- Node.js --
import { AbstractNode } from './internal'

export class Node extends AbstractNode {
   /* as is */
}

// -- Leaf.js --
import { AbstractNode } from './internal'

export class Leaf extends AbstractNode {
   /* as is */
}

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