15

While working on a submenu that (un)folds as users hover a parent menu item, I ran into the following issue. Consider the following markup (below or on JSFiddle).

ul {
  max-height: 0;
  overflow: hidden;
  margin: 10px;
  padding: 0;
  border: 10px solid #bada55;
  list-style-type: none;
  transition: border-color .4s;
}
ul:hover {
  max-height: 100px;
  border-color: #de2d26;
}

ul > li {
  padding: 10px;
  pointer-events: auto;
}

.ignorant {
  pointer-events: none;
}

.offset {
  position: relative; /* This is the culprit! */
}
<ul class="ignorant">
  <li>I am ignorant of your pointer.
      If you see me, something went wrong!</li>
</ul>
<ul>
  <li>I am not. Hover me!</li>
</ul>
<ul class="ignorant offset">
  <li>I should be ignorant of your pointer.
      If you see me, something went wrong!</li>
</ul>

Setup. We have three lists here of which the contents are hidden, because the max-height of the lists is set to 0. The borders are still shown, which is expected behavior: the height directive of an element by default only applies to the content of the element.

We show the contents on hover of the list, by setting the max-height to some big enough value.

Now, I want to make the list visible only when the contents are hovered, not the borders. This, I believe, should be achievable using pointer-events as shown above. Ignore events on the borders and re-enable them on the items in the lists.

Problem. So far, so good, this works fine in Firefox and mostly in Chrome. Namely, when I position the container relative, it is possible to trigger a hover of the content in Chrome.

Firefox still works as I would expect it to, not triggering a hover. When having no borders, triggering a hover is no longer possible in Chrome either.

Question. Is this a bug in Chrome? Or is it not clearly specified how this should be handled and therefore undefined behavior? I would be interested in any of the following:
1. an explanation of what I am doing wrong, and why;
2. an explanation of why it is okay for different browsers to behave differently in this case;
3. a brief explanation of why this is a bug. In this case, I'd be happy to report one.


This is tested, at the moment, with
• Firefox 52.0.1 (64-bit Linux N);
• Firefox 52.0.2 (64-bit Windows N);
• Internet Explorer 11.0.9600.17031 (64-bit Windows N);
• Chrome 57.0.2987.133 (64-bit Linux S, 64-bit Windows S);
• Chromium 57.0.2987.98 (64-bit Linux S).
S means shown, N means not shown on hover, when using relative positioning.

Thanks to BoltClock for making this question better through their constructive comments.

  • 1
    If you remove the pointer events from the child li, it should work properly: jsfiddle.net/cq31zqa8/3 – Pete Apr 3 '17 at 11:37
  • 1
    Simply positioning the element relatively alone seems to trigger it, whether the offset is fractional, whole, or zero (or auto, which computes to zero anyway). – BoltClock Apr 3 '17 at 11:44
  • 1
    "An element is hovered when its borders are hovered, I believe, but I could not find this in the Selectors Level 3 specification." An element's borders are considered to be part of the element's box - this is true in all of CSS. So the general statement applies: "a visual user agent could apply this pseudo-class when the cursor (mouse pointer) hovers over a box generated by the element." – BoltClock Apr 3 '17 at 11:48
  • @Pete, sure, but then the hover effect does not apply when the items are hovered (when the list is unfolded by other means). – Just a student Apr 3 '17 at 12:02
  • @BoltClock You are right! That makes it even more interesting... I was first suspecting some rounding error, but that cannot be the case then. Thanks for the explanation on the boxes :-) – Just a student Apr 3 '17 at 12:04
1
+100

I don't have an official explanation for this, but I know it has to do with block formatting contexts (MDN, W3C). I also am quite confident @BoltClock, who has a thorough understanding of BFCs (I sometimes suspect him for writing the spec in the first place), will be able to provide an exact technical explanation, should he ever wish to do so.

In short, knowing the source is knowing the fix (tested and works): when you need to set position:relative on the parent, also set position:relative on the children:

/* ... */
.offset {
  position: relative; /* This is the culprit! */
}
.offset > * {
  position: relative; /* And this is the fix! */
}

ul {
  max-height: 0;
  overflow: hidden;
  margin: 10px;
  padding: 0;
  border: 10px solid #bada55;
  list-style-type: none;
  transition: border-color .4s;
}
ul:hover {
  max-height: 100px;
  border-color: #de2d26;
}

ul > li {
  padding: 10px;
  pointer-events: auto;
}

.ignorant {
  pointer-events: none;
}

.offset {
  position: relative; /* This is the culprit! */
}
.offset > * {
  position: relative; /* And this is the fix! */
}
<ul class="ignorant">
  <li>I am ignorant of your pointer.
      If you see me, something went wrong!</li>
</ul>
<ul>
  <li>I am not. Hover me!</li>
</ul>
<ul class="ignorant offset">
  <li>I should be ignorant of your pointer.
      If you see me, something went wrong!</li>
</ul>

That's what you wanted, right? Cross browser.


Note: it doesn't have to be relative. It has to be anything but static.

  • Thank you very much, this gives me something to investigate further. Also, your fix works perfectly! I don't fully understand yet how block formatting contexts lead to position: relative on the children being a fix. If I read the spec correctly, this will make it so that a new BFC is created for every child, so that somehow influences how Chrome calculates if it is hovered? – Just a student Apr 10 '17 at 7:56
  • @Justastudent, the way I understand it, when a BFC is created for a children, this BFC is correctly calculated (resulting in 0 height) hence it will no longer receive clicks inside the parent's BFC - which includes the parent borders). I'm not 100% sure, so I didn't include my interpretation in the answer. But I knew for sure was that it works. Hence, my answer. :) – Andrei Gheorghiu Apr 10 '17 at 8:02
  • Hmm. All my lists have overflow: hidden and thus form a BFC, as per "block boxes with 'overflow' other than 'visible'" in the spec. So then setting position: relative should not change anything, right? – Just a student Apr 10 '17 at 8:03
  • 1
    But something must be wrong about my assumption: if setting overflow to anything other than visible creates a new BFC for a child, the same result would be obtained by setting overflow:hidden on a child (and it wouldn't affect anything else, since they don't have a set height). However, this doesn't happen. Replacing position:relative on <li>s with overflow:hidden in the fix doesn't produce the same result. Or maybe overflow:hidden only creates a BFC when the contents actually overflow (it has a height)? I'm at a loss here. – Andrei Gheorghiu Apr 10 '17 at 8:28
  • 1
    I have decided to award you the bounty because I did not know about BFCs before and learned a lot thanks to you, so thank you for that. This also seems to be the most plausible and complete explanation so far, hence I am accepting this answer as well. – Just a student Apr 13 '17 at 6:43
2

Hover event bubbles the same way on all browsers which is proven by this example.

ul {
  max-height: 0;
  /* overflow: hidden; */
  margin: 10px;
  padding: 0;
  border: 10px solid #bada55;
  list-style-type: none;
  transition: border-color .4s;
}

ul:hover {
  max-height: 100px;
  border-color: #de2d26;
}

ul > li {
  padding: 10px;
  pointer-events: auto;
  position: relative;
  top: 100px;
  background: yellow;
}

.ignorant {
  pointer-events: none;
}

.offset {
  position: relative;
}
<ul class="ignorant offset">
  <li>Hover me! Testing :hover across browsers...</li>
</ul>

What I concluded:

  • it doesn't matter what elements we use, what matters is their position and display property;
  • it doesn't happen when child has position: relative or display: inline.

Hover is fired only when mouse is over the area where child's box model covers same pixels as its parent's box model. This area can be seen on the screen just above the blue rectangle. Don't even say it's aqua or something, I'm a simple programmer, I have no idea about colors.

common box area fires hover event

Chrome hides child element because of its parent's overflow: hidden property which is expected behavior. What's unexpected is child's event box (if I can call it that) is still "visible" and hovers over it's parent's border just like it would with overflow: visible.

The strange thing is it doesn't happen, as I stated before, when child has position: relative or display other than block.

According to W3C:

Once a box has been laid out according to the normal flow or floated, it may be shifted relative to this position. This is called relative positioning. Offsetting a box (B1) in this way has no effect on the box (B2) that follows: B2 is given a position as if B1 were not offset and B2 is not re-positioned after B1's offset is applied.

Which, to my understanding, implies that position: relative should have no effect on the boxes. The fact that it has proves that it's a Chrome bug.

As to the pointer events. MDN states:

Note that preventing an element from being the target of mouse events by using pointer-events does not necessarily mean that mouse event listeners on that element cannot or will not be triggered. If one of the element's children has pointer-events explicitly set to allow that child to be the target of mouse events, then any events targeting that child will pass through the parent as the event travels along the parent chain, and trigger event listeners on the parent as appropriate. Of course any mouse activity at a point on the screen that is covered by the parent but not by the child will not be caught by either the child or the parent (it will go "through" the parent and target whatever is underneath).

Which means Chrome is not showing the child's event box on top of its parent but actually below it. It's just that the event goes through the parent element and hits its child. This shouldn't happen with overflow: hidden though.

  • Thank you very much for your answer! You had me laughing at your remark about the color of the rectangle. Indeed your fix seems to work fine, but it leaves me scratching my head as to why. I'll investigate some more and get back to this answer :-) – Just a student Apr 10 '17 at 7:54
  • Your fix is good, so I was tempted to award you something, but in the end the other answer helped me more. You got my upvote at least. I think that what the inspector shows is accurate, because that is where the child is, it is just not shown because of overflow: hidden on its parent. I also think that the MDN quote at the end and your explanation below it are not accurate, because hovering only can be done at the zero-height "content" of the parent, not everywhere. Still, your answer helped me with testing and discovering things. Thanks a lot! – Just a student Apr 13 '17 at 6:47

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