362

Say I have a Python function that returns multiple values in a tuple:

def func():
    return 1, 2

Is there a nice way to ignore one of the results rather than just assigning to a temporary variable? Say if I was only interested in the first value, is there a better way than this:

x, temp = func()
2
  • 3
    I got curious of this too coming from Matlab's similar notion of Ignore Function Outputs where they use ~ as the syntax to ignore a particular return variable
    – jxramos
    Jun 12, 2017 at 18:09
  • 4
    You selected the wrong answer as solution
    – AGP
    Jan 7, 2019 at 17:58

11 Answers 11

719

You can use x = func()[0] to return the first value, x = func()[1] to return the second, and so on.

If you want to get multiple values at a time, use something like x, y = func()[2:4].

18
  • 103
    This should be the accepted answer. You can also use things like func()[2:4] if you only want some of the return values.
    – endolith
    Aug 4, 2011 at 2:03
  • 13
    It doesn't call the function multiple times: >>> def test(): ... print "here" ... return 1,2,3 ... >>> a,b = test()[:2] here [edit: sorry that code didn't come through, aparently you only get one line in comments. For those not familiar >>> and ... are the start of a new line in the python shell]
    – teeks99
    Aug 17, 2011 at 20:56
  • 41
    @TylerLong: I think _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, a, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, b, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, c, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, d, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, _, e, _ = func() is less clear than calling the function multiple times, but that's just my opinion. If your function returns that many items, I think using numpy would be preferable: a, b, c, d, e = func()[[13, 25, 58, 89, 98]]
    – endolith
    Mar 26, 2013 at 15:41
  • 31
    @endolith I think this is better and does not need numpy and does not need to call func() multiple times: result = func() a = result[13] b = result[25] ...
    – Tyler Liu
    Mar 27, 2013 at 3:04
  • 3
    This style is not nice when you want to ignore one or a few values in between, e.g. x, __, y = func()
    – ndemou
    Jun 15, 2016 at 13:30
321

One common convention is to use a "_" as a variable name for the elements of the tuple you wish to ignore. For instance:

def f():
    return 1, 2, 3

_, _, x = f()
20
  • 103
    -1: this "convention" sucks when you add gettext functionality to someone else's code (that defines a function called '_') so it should be banned
    – nosklo
    Jan 11, 2009 at 13:32
  • 38
    Good point--though it's debatable whether gettext's insistence on installing a function called "" is a good idea. Personally, I find it a little ugly. Regardless, the use of "" as a throwaway variable is widespread. Jan 11, 2009 at 13:44
  • 32
    -1: _ means "last output" in IPython. I would never assign something to it.
    – endolith
    Jan 24, 2010 at 17:27
  • 25
    Ok, I didn't notice the "I" - thanks for the reference. IMHO you can't expect others not to use a variable just because one Python app defines its own magical use for it.
    – Draemon
    Jun 13, 2010 at 23:38
  • 8
    some IDEs such as PyDev will give you a warning on this, because you have unused variables.
    – teeks99
    Aug 17, 2011 at 20:58
135

If you're using Python 3, you can you use the star before a variable (on the left side of an assignment) to have it be a list in unpacking.

# Example 1: a is 1 and b is [2, 3]

a, *b = [1, 2, 3]

# Example 2: a is 1, b is [2, 3], and c is 4

a, *b, c = [1, 2, 3, 4]

# Example 3: b is [1, 2] and c is 3

*b, c = [1, 2, 3]       

# Example 4: a is 1 and b is []

a, *b = [1]
1
  • 25
    You can also use a, *_ = f() to ignore arbitrary number of returned values after a.
    – THN
    May 10, 2020 at 9:53
27

The common practice is to use the dummy variable _ (single underscore), as many have indicated here before.

However, to avoid collisions with other uses of that variable name (see this response) it might be a better practice to use __ (double underscore) instead as a throwaway variable, as pointed by ncoghlan. E.g.:

x, __ = func()
1
  • 4
    Not a bad idea at all. But then '_ _ ' would declare a variable in the namespace. Whereas, ' _ ' does not declare unless specifically used on the left hand side of the assignment statement like above (eg: a, _, _ = 1,8,9). Until that point, it stores the result of the last statement executed which if you want to catch, you'd normally use a variable to store that value. And this is why, ' _ ' is the suggested variable name to catch junk values. ' _ ' values get overwritten soon after another statement is executed. In case of '_ _', value would remain there until GC cleans it off. Feb 11, 2020 at 18:49
23

Remember, when you return more than one item, you're really returning a tuple. So you can do things like this:

def func():
    return 1, 2

print func()[0] # prints 1
print func()[1] # prints 2
1
  • Useful for the syntax. A problem with this is that it requires calling the function multiple times. For such a trivial function, this is no big deal. But, in more complex functions, this could be undesirable. Good to know there are many approaches....
    – jvriesem
    Aug 19, 2021 at 18:45
19

Three simple choices.

Obvious

x, _ = func()

x, junk = func()

Hideous

x = func()[0]

And there are ways to do this with a decorator.

def val0( aFunc ):
    def pick0( *args, **kw ):
        return aFunc(*args,**kw)[0]
    return pick0

func0= val0(func)
4
  • 6
    I really prefer the _ variable. It's very obvious that you're ignoring a value
    – Claudiu
    Nov 23, 2009 at 18:22
  • 25
    Your examples are backwards. x, _ = func() is hideous, and x = func()[0] is obvious. Assigning to a variable and then not using it? The function is returning a tuple; index it like a tuple.
    – endolith
    Mar 26, 2013 at 14:41
  • 9
    In pattern matching languages, from which Python derived this pattern, the 'obvious' method is indeed obvious, not hideous, and canonical. Although, in such languages the wildcard is a supported language feature whereas in Python it's a real variable and gets bound, which is a little unpalatable.
    – Joe
    Nov 29, 2013 at 14:21
  • 5
    For list processing languages, from which Python is derived ;), list accessors such as a[0], a[:] (list copy), a[::2] (every two elements), and a[i:] + a[:i] (rotate a list), are indeed, also obvious and canonical.
    – cod3monk3y
    Nov 27, 2014 at 16:40
19

The best solution probably is to name things instead of returning meaningless tuples (unless there is some logic behind the order of the returned items). You can for example use a dictionary:

def func():
    return {'lat': 1, 'lng': 2}
    
latitude = func()['lat']

You could even use namedtuple if you want to add extra information about what you are returning (it's not just a dictionary, it's a pair of coordinates):

from collections import namedtuple 

Coordinates = namedtuple('Coordinates', ['lat', 'lng'])

def func():
    return Coordinates(lat=1, lng=2)

latitude = func().lat

If the objects within your dictionary/tuple are strongly tied together then it may be a good idea to even define a class for it. That way you'll also be able to define more complex operations. A natural question that follows is: When should I be using classes in Python?

Most recent versions of python (≥ 3.7) have dataclasses which you can use to define classes with very few lines of code:

from dataclasses import dataclass

@dataclass
class Coordinates:
    lat: float = 0
    lng: float = 0

def func():
    return Coordinates(lat=1, lng=2)

latitude = func().lat

The primary advantage of dataclasses over namedtuple is that its easier to extend, but there are other differences. Note that by default, dataclasses are mutable, but you can use @dataclass(frozen=True) instead of @dataclass to force them being immutable.

Here is a video that might help you pick the right data class for your use case.

1
  • 2
    This is the only answer that gets at the heart of the problem hidden in this question. If you are trying to select one of a function's tuple outputs, they probably shouldn't be in a tuple. Tuples are for things that "go together" in an ordered way. In the OP's case, they are (probably) "qualitatively different" outputs, and should really be named in some way. Asking a reader to understand what the first and second output refer to, when there's no natural ordering, is a recipe for trouble. Sep 22, 2021 at 21:54
5

This seems like the best choice to me:

val1, val2, ignored1, ignored2 = some_function()

It's not cryptic or ugly (like the func()[index] method), and clearly states your purpose.

5

If this is a function that you use all the time but always discard the second argument, I would argue that it is less messy to create an alias for the function without the second return value using lambda.

def func():
    return 1, 2

func_ = lambda: func()[0] 

func_()  # Prints 1 
4

This is not a direct answer to the question. Rather it answers this question: "How do I choose a specific function output from many possible options?".

If you are able to write the function (ie, it is not in a library you cannot modify), then add an input argument that indicates what you want out of the function. Make it a named argument with a default value so in the "common case" you don't even have to specify it.

    def fancy_function( arg1, arg2, return_type=1 ):
        ret_val = None
        if( 1 == return_type ):
            ret_val = arg1 + arg2
        elif( 2 == return_type ):
            ret_val = [ arg1, arg2, arg1 * arg2 ]
        else:
            ret_val = ( arg1, arg2, arg1 + arg2, arg1 * arg2 ) 
        return( ret_val )

This method gives the function "advanced warning" regarding the desired output. Consequently it can skip unneeded processing and only do the work necessary to get your desired output. Also because Python does dynamic typing, the return type can change. Notice how the example returns a scalar, a list or a tuple... whatever you like!

2

When you have many output from a function and you don't want to call it multiple times, I think the clearest way for selecting the results would be :

results = fct()
a,b = [results[i] for i in list_of_index]

As a minimum working example, also demonstrating that the function is called only once :

def fct(a):
    b=a*2
    c=a+2
    d=a+b
    e=b*2
    f=a*a
    print("fct called")
    return[a,b,c,d,e,f]

results=fct(3)
> fct called

x,y = [results[i] for i in [1,4]]

And the values are as expected :

results
> [3,6,5,9,12,9]
x
> 6
y
> 12

For convenience, Python list indexes can also be used :

x,y = [results[i] for i in [0,-2]]

Returns : a = 3 and b = 12

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.