4

I was writing a javascript program and running it in Chrome 7, when I encountered some strange behavior. Now, in my code, with all the other stuff going on, it took me some time to figure out it wasn't me.

I have distilled the essence of the code below.

<html>

<script>

var data = [1,2,3,4,5];

var data_copy = [];

for (var i=0; i<data.length; i++){
    data_copy.push(data[i]);
}

console.log("Printing before:");
console.log(data_copy);

//alert(data_copy);

console.log("------------------------");

for (var i=0; i<data_copy.length; i++){
    data_copy[i] = data_copy[i] * 1000;
}

console.log("Printing after:");
console.log(data_copy);

</script>

</html>

When I run this on Chrome 7, I get the output that follows in the Javascript console:

Printing before:
[1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, 5000]
------------------------
Printing after:
[1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, 5000]

How come the first call to console.log prints the changed version of data_copy?

Now, if I uncomment the "alert" and run the same code, I get what you would normally expect:

Printing before:
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
------------------------
Printing after:
[1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, 5000]

I also tried the code in node.js and I get the second (normal) output.

Any ideas?

Is this some JIT optimization gone awry?

Or am I missing something obvious?

1
  • One guess is that the browser executes the call to log asynchronously, after the change. But why would it do that?
    – Hejazzman
    Commented Dec 1, 2010 at 0:01

2 Answers 2

4

Change console.log(data_copy) to console.log(String(data_copy)).

console.log effectively sends the object by reference to Chrome's Console. alert interrupts your script so the first logged data_copy gets rendered before the later modification; without, the entire script runs to completion before the console renders either data_copy reference.

8
  • I can see the console.log call being by reference, but why it doesn't get rendered immediately?
    – Hejazzman
    Commented Dec 1, 2010 at 0:25
  • And why doesn't node.js, being essentially V8, give the same (wrong) output?
    – Hejazzman
    Commented Dec 1, 2010 at 0:25
  • @foljs: The console isn't part of V8, it's part of Chrome. And the JS thread in browsers is necessarily single-threaded, so the Chrome guys apparently decided that queuing up the object and waiting for the next time the JS thread is free was easier than figuring out how to get the JS thread to render a JS object from within arbitrary context.
    – ephemient
    Commented Dec 1, 2010 at 0:49
  • @foljs: In all browsers, rendering happens only when js in not executing. It's how js was implemented in the first place: Netscape saw that they can squeeze a script interpreter between the traditional two phases of page loading download->render so that now we get download->run_javascript->render. It's also how things like setTimeout works: schedule the code to run in another run_javascript phase. The real issue here is that Chrome doesn't resolve the console.log arguments to string when it is called like how node.js does.
    – slebetman
    Commented Dec 1, 2010 at 3:12
  • Also it should be noted that the javascript language, per se, doesn't include things like document.getElementById or console.log. Those are API that may or may not be supported by a specific implementation. Node.js for example does not support the DOM API so it doesn't have document.getElementById. And the DOM API is also not part of V8, it is part of Safari/Chrome/Webkit. V8 is just a javascript interpreter.
    – slebetman
    Commented Dec 1, 2010 at 3:17
1

See crbug.com/44720

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.