89

I argued with a friend the other day about those two snippets. Which is faster and why ?

value = 5;
if (condition) {
    value = 6;
}

and:

if (condition) {
    value = 6;
} else {
    value = 5;
}

What if value is a matrix ?

Note: I know that value = condition ? 6 : 5; exists and I expect it to be faster, but it wasn't an option.

Edit (requested by staff since question is on hold at the moment):

  • please answer by considering either x86 assembly generated by mainstream compilers (say g++, clang++, vc, mingw) in both optimized and non optimized versions or MIPS assembly.
  • when assembly differ, explain why a version is faster and when (e.g. "better because no branching and branching has following issue blahblah")
14
  • 174
    The optimization will kill all that out... it doesn't matter... Apr 4 '17 at 8:29
  • 21
    You could profile it, personally I doubt you'd see any difference using a modern compiler.
    – George
    Apr 4 '17 at 8:33
  • 25
    Using value = condition ? 6 : 5; instead of if/else will most likely result in the same code being generated. Look at the assembly output if you want to know more. Apr 4 '17 at 8:38
  • 8
    the most important thing in this case is to avoid the branch, which is the most expensive thing here. ( pipe reload, discard pre-fetched instructions etc.)
    – Tommylee2k
    Apr 4 '17 at 9:43
  • 11
    The only time it makes any sense to micro-optimize for speed like this is inside a loop that will run many many times, and either the optimizer can optimize out all the branch instructions, as gcc can for this trivial example, or real-world performance will depend heavily on correct branch prediction (obligatory link to stackoverflow.com/questions/11227809/…). If you’ll unavoidably branch inside a loop, you can help the branch predictor by generating a profile and recompiling with it.
    – Davislor
    Apr 4 '17 at 17:43
286

TL;DR: In unoptimized code, if without else seems irrelevantly more efficient but with even the most basic level of optimization enabled the code is basically rewritten to value = condition + 5.


I gave it a try and generated the assembly for the following code:

int ifonly(bool condition, int value)
{
    value = 5;
    if (condition) {
        value = 6;
    }
    return value;
}

int ifelse(bool condition, int value)
{
    if (condition) {
        value = 6;
    } else {
        value = 5;
    }
    return value;
}

On gcc 6.3 with optimizations disabled (-O0), the relevant difference is:

 mov     DWORD PTR [rbp-8], 5
 cmp     BYTE PTR [rbp-4], 0
 je      .L2
 mov     DWORD PTR [rbp-8], 6
.L2:
 mov     eax, DWORD PTR [rbp-8]

for ifonly, while ifelse has

 cmp     BYTE PTR [rbp-4], 0
 je      .L5
 mov     DWORD PTR [rbp-8], 6
 jmp     .L6
.L5:
 mov     DWORD PTR [rbp-8], 5
.L6:
 mov     eax, DWORD PTR [rbp-8]

The latter looks slightly less efficient because it has an extra jump but both have at least two and at most three assignments so unless you really need to squeeze every last drop of performance (hint: unless you are working on a space shuttle you don't, and even then you probably don't) the difference won't be noticeable.

However, even with the lowest optimization level (-O1) both functions reduce to the same:

test    dil, dil
setne   al
movzx   eax, al
add     eax, 5

which is basically the equivalent of

return 5 + condition;

assuming condition is zero or one. Higher optimization levels don't really change the output, except they manage to avoid the movzx by efficiently zeroing out the EAX register at the start.


Disclaimer: You probably shouldn't write 5 + condition yourself (even though the standard guarantees that converting true to an integer type gives 1) because your intent might not be immediately obvious to people reading your code (which may include your future self). The point of this code is to show that what the compiler produces in both cases is (practically) identical. Ciprian Tomoiaga states it quite well in the comments:

a human's job is to write code for humans and let the compiler write code for the machine.

18
  • 51
    This is a great answer and should be accepted.
    – dtell
    Apr 4 '17 at 8:44
  • 10
    I would've never though of using the addition (<- what python does to you.) Apr 4 '17 at 13:42
  • 26
    @CiprianTomoiaga and unless you're writing an optimiser, you shouldn't! In almost all cases you should let the compiler do optimisations like this, especially where they severely reduce code readability. Only if performance testing shows issues with a certain bit of code should you even start to try to optimise it, and even then keep it clean and well-commented, and only perform optimisations that make a measurable difference.
    – Muzer
    Apr 4 '17 at 13:48
  • 22
    I wanted to reply to Muzer, but it wouldn't have added anything to the thread. However, I just want to restate that a human's job is to write code for humans and let the compiler write code for the machine. I said that from a compiler developer PoV (which I'm not, but I learnt a bit about them) Apr 4 '17 at 18:39
  • 10
    The value true converted to int always yields 1, period. Of course, if your condition is merely "truthy" and not the bool value true, then that's a completely different matter.
    – T.C.
    Apr 4 '17 at 19:35
44

The answer from CompuChip shows that for int they both are optimized to the same assembly, so it doesn't matter.

What if value is a matrix ?

I will interpret this in a more general way, i.e. what if value is of a type whose constructions and assignments are expensive (and moves are cheap).

then

T value = init1;
if (condition)
   value = init2;

is sub-optimal because in case condition is true, you do the unnecessary initialization to init1 and then you do the copy assignment.

T value;
if (condition)
   value = init2;
else
   value = init3;

This is better. But still sub-optimal if default construction is expensive and if copy construction is more expensive then initialization.

You have the conditional operator solution which is good:

T value = condition ? init1 : init2;

Or, if you don't like the conditional operator, you can create a helper function like this:

T create(bool condition)
{
  if (condition)
     return {init1};
  else
     return {init2};
}

T value = create(condition);

Depending on what init1 and init2 are you can also consider this:

auto final_init = condition ? init1 : init2;
T value = final_init;

But again I must emphasize that this is relevant only when construction and assignments are really expensive for the given type. And even then, only by profiling you know for sure.

8
  • 3
    Expensive and not optimized out. For example, if the default constructor zeroes-out the matrix, the compiler could realize that the assignment is just about overwriting those 0s, so not zero it at all, and write directly in this memory. Of course, optimizers are finicky beasts so it's hard to predict when they kick in or not... Apr 4 '17 at 14:17
  • @MatthieuM. of course. What I meant by "expensive" is "expensive to execute (by a metric, be it either CPU clocks, resource utilization etc.) even after compiler optimizations.
    – bolov
    Apr 4 '17 at 14:25
  • It seems unlikely to me that default construction would be expensive but moves cheap.
    – plugwash
    Apr 4 '17 at 17:31
  • 6
    @plugwash Consider a class with a very large allocated array. Default constructor allocates and initializes the array, which is costly. The move (not copy!) constructor can just swap pointers with the source object and doesn't need to allocate or initialize the large array.
    – TrentP
    Apr 4 '17 at 22:07
  • 1
    As long as the parts are simple, I would definitely prefer using the ?: operator over introducing a new function. After all, you'll likely not just pass the condition to the function, but also some constructor arguments. Some of which may not even be used by create() depending on the condition. Apr 5 '17 at 14:33
12

In pseudo-assembly language,

    li    #0, r0
    test  r1
    beq   L1
    li    #1, r0
L1:

may or may not be faster than

    test  r1
    beq   L1
    li    #1, r0
    bra   L2
L1:
    li    #0, r0
L2:

depending on how sophisticated the actual CPU is. Going from simplest to fanciest:

  • With any CPU manufactured after roughly 1990, good performance depends on the code fitting within the instruction cache. When in doubt, therefore, minimize code size. This weighs in favor of the first example.

  • With a basic "in-order, five-stage pipeline" CPU, which is still roughly what you get in many microcontrollers, there is a pipeline bubble every time a branch—conditional or unconditional—is taken, so it is also important to minimize the number of branch instructions. This also weighs in favor of the first example.

  • Somewhat more sophisticated CPUs—fancy enough to do "out-of-order execution", but not fancy enough to use the best known implementations of that concept—may incur pipeline bubbles whenever they encounter write-after-write hazards. This weighs in favor of the second example, where r0 is written only once no matter what. These CPUs are usually fancy enough to process unconditional branches in the instruction fetcher, so you aren't just trading the write-after-write penalty for a branch penalty.

    I don't know if anyone is still making this kind of CPU anymore. However, the CPUs that do use the "best known implementations" of out-of-order execution are likely to cut corners on the less frequently used instructions, so you need to be aware that this sort of thing can happen. A real example is false data dependencies on the destination registers in popcnt and lzcnt on Sandy Bridge CPUs.

  • At the highest end, the OOO engine will wind up issuing exactly the same sequence of internal operations for both code fragments—this is the hardware version of "don't worry about it, the compiler will generate the same machine code either way." However, code size still does matter, and now you also should be worrying about the predictability of the conditional branch. Branch prediction failures potentially cause a complete pipeline flush, which is catastrophic for performance; see Why is it faster to process a sorted array than an unsorted array? to understand how much difference this can make.

    If the branch is highly unpredictable, and your CPU has conditional-set or conditional-move instructions, this is the time to use them:

        li    #0, r0
        test  r1
        setne r0
    

    or

        li    #0, r0
        li    #1, r2
        test  r1
        movne r2, r0
    

    The conditional-set version is also more compact than any other alternative; if that instruction is available it is practically guaranteed to be the Right Thing for this scenario, even if the branch was predictable. The conditional-move version requires an additional scratch register, and always wastes one li instruction's worth of dispatch and execute resources; if the branch was in fact predictable, the branchy version may well be faster.

4
  • I'd reword your second point as to whether the CPU has an out-of-order engine that gets delayed by write-after-write hazards. If a CPU has an out-of-order engine that can handle such hazards without delay, there's no problem, but there's also no problem if the CPU doesn't have an out-of-order engine at all.
    – supercat
    Apr 4 '17 at 19:23
  • @supercat The paragraph at the end is meant to cover that case but I'll think about how to make it clearer.
    – zwol
    Apr 4 '17 at 19:24
  • I don't know what current CPUs have a cache which would cause sequentially-executed code to run faster the second time through than the first time (some flash-based ARM parts have an interface that can buffer a few rows of flash data, but can fetch code sequentially as fast as they execute it, but the key to making branch-heavy code run fast on those is to copy it to RAM). CPUs without any out-of-order execution at all are far more common than those which would get delayed by write-after-write hazards.
    – supercat
    Apr 4 '17 at 20:39
  • This is very insightful
    – Julien__
    Apr 13 '17 at 8:42
9

In unoptimised code, the first example assigns a variable always once and sometimes twice. The second example only ever assigns a variable once. The conditional is the same on both code paths, so that shouldn't matter. In optimised code, it depends on the compiler.

As always, if you are that concerned, generate the assembly and see what the compiler is actually doing.

2
  • 1
    If concerned about performance then they wont compile unoptimized. But certainly how "good" is the optimizer depends on the compiler/version.
    – old_timer
    Apr 4 '17 at 17:09
  • AFAIK there is no comment on which compiler/CPU architecture etc, so potentially, their compiler doesn't do optimising. They could be compiling on anything from an 8-bit PIC to a 64-bit Xeon.
    – Neil
    Apr 5 '17 at 7:54
8

What would make you think any of them even the one liner is faster or slower?

unsigned int fun0 ( unsigned int condition, unsigned int value )
{
    value = 5;
    if (condition) {
        value = 6;
    }
    return(value);
}
unsigned int fun1 ( unsigned int condition, unsigned int value )
{

    if (condition) {
        value = 6;
    } else {
        value = 5;
    }
    return(value);
}
unsigned int fun2 ( unsigned int condition, unsigned int value )
{
    value = condition ? 6 : 5;
    return(value);
}

More lines of code of a high level language gives the compiler more to work with so if you want to make a general rule about it give the compiler more code to work with. If the algorithm is the same like the cases above then one would expect the compiler with minimal optimization to figure that out.

00000000 <fun0>:
   0:   e3500000    cmp r0, #0
   4:   03a00005    moveq   r0, #5
   8:   13a00006    movne   r0, #6
   c:   e12fff1e    bx  lr

00000010 <fun1>:
  10:   e3500000    cmp r0, #0
  14:   13a00006    movne   r0, #6
  18:   03a00005    moveq   r0, #5
  1c:   e12fff1e    bx  lr

00000020 <fun2>:
  20:   e3500000    cmp r0, #0
  24:   13a00006    movne   r0, #6
  28:   03a00005    moveq   r0, #5
  2c:   e12fff1e    bx  lr

not a big surprise it did the first function in a different order, same execution time though.

0000000000000000 <fun0>:
   0:   7100001f    cmp w0, #0x0
   4:   1a9f07e0    cset    w0, ne
   8:   11001400    add w0, w0, #0x5
   c:   d65f03c0    ret

0000000000000010 <fun1>:
  10:   7100001f    cmp w0, #0x0
  14:   1a9f07e0    cset    w0, ne
  18:   11001400    add w0, w0, #0x5
  1c:   d65f03c0    ret

0000000000000020 <fun2>:
  20:   7100001f    cmp w0, #0x0
  24:   1a9f07e0    cset    w0, ne
  28:   11001400    add w0, w0, #0x5
  2c:   d65f03c0    ret

Hopefully you get the idea you could have just tried this if it wasnt obvious that the different implementations were not actually different.

As far as a matrix goes, not sure how that matters,

if(condition)
{
 big blob of code a
}
else
{
 big blob of code b
}

just going to put the same if-then-else wrapper around the big blobs of code be they value=5 or something more complicated. Likewise the comparison even if it is a big blob of code it still has to be computed, and equal to or not equal to something is often compiled with the negative, if (condition) do something is often compiled as if not condition goto.

00000000 <fun0>:
   0:   0f 93           tst r15     
   2:   03 24           jz  $+8         ;abs 0xa
   4:   3f 40 06 00     mov #6, r15 ;#0x0006
   8:   30 41           ret         
   a:   3f 40 05 00     mov #5, r15 ;#0x0005
   e:   30 41           ret         

00000010 <fun1>:
  10:   0f 93           tst r15     
  12:   03 20           jnz $+8         ;abs 0x1a
  14:   3f 40 05 00     mov #5, r15 ;#0x0005
  18:   30 41           ret         
  1a:   3f 40 06 00     mov #6, r15 ;#0x0006
  1e:   30 41           ret         

00000020 <fun2>:
  20:   0f 93           tst r15     
  22:   03 20           jnz $+8         ;abs 0x2a
  24:   3f 40 05 00     mov #5, r15 ;#0x0005
  28:   30 41           ret         
  2a:   3f 40 06 00     mov #6, r15 ;#0x0006
  2e:   30 41

we just went through this exercise with someone else recently on stackoverflow. this mips compiler interestingly in that case not only realized the functions were the same, but had one function simply jump to the other to save on code space. Didnt do that here though

00000000 <fun0>:
   0:   0004102b    sltu    $2,$0,$4
   4:   03e00008    jr  $31
   8:   24420005    addiu   $2,$2,5

0000000c <fun1>:
   c:   0004102b    sltu    $2,$0,$4
  10:   03e00008    jr  $31
  14:   24420005    addiu   $2,$2,5

00000018 <fun2>:
  18:   0004102b    sltu    $2,$0,$4
  1c:   03e00008    jr  $31
  20:   24420005    addiu   $2,$2,5

some more targets.

00000000 <_fun0>:
   0:   1166            mov r5, -(sp)
   2:   1185            mov sp, r5
   4:   0bf5 0004       tst 4(r5)
   8:   0304            beq 12 <_fun0+0x12>
   a:   15c0 0006       mov $6, r0
   e:   1585            mov (sp)+, r5
  10:   0087            rts pc
  12:   15c0 0005       mov $5, r0
  16:   1585            mov (sp)+, r5
  18:   0087            rts pc

0000001a <_fun1>:
  1a:   1166            mov r5, -(sp)
  1c:   1185            mov sp, r5
  1e:   0bf5 0004       tst 4(r5)
  22:   0204            bne 2c <_fun1+0x12>
  24:   15c0 0005       mov $5, r0
  28:   1585            mov (sp)+, r5
  2a:   0087            rts pc
  2c:   15c0 0006       mov $6, r0
  30:   1585            mov (sp)+, r5
  32:   0087            rts pc

00000034 <_fun2>:
  34:   1166            mov r5, -(sp)
  36:   1185            mov sp, r5
  38:   0bf5 0004       tst 4(r5)
  3c:   0204            bne 46 <_fun2+0x12>
  3e:   15c0 0005       mov $5, r0
  42:   1585            mov (sp)+, r5
  44:   0087            rts pc
  46:   15c0 0006       mov $6, r0
  4a:   1585            mov (sp)+, r5
  4c:   0087            rts pc

00000000 <fun0>:
   0:   00a03533            snez    x10,x10
   4:   0515                    addi    x10,x10,5
   6:   8082                    ret

00000008 <fun1>:
   8:   00a03533            snez    x10,x10
   c:   0515                    addi    x10,x10,5
   e:   8082                    ret

00000010 <fun2>:
  10:   00a03533            snez    x10,x10
  14:   0515                    addi    x10,x10,5
  16:   8082                    ret

and compilers

with this i code one would expect the different targets to match as well

define i32 @fun0(i32 %condition, i32 %value) #0 {
  %1 = icmp ne i32 %condition, 0
  %. = select i1 %1, i32 6, i32 5
  ret i32 %.
}

; Function Attrs: norecurse nounwind readnone
define i32 @fun1(i32 %condition, i32 %value) #0 {
  %1 = icmp eq i32 %condition, 0
  %. = select i1 %1, i32 5, i32 6
  ret i32 %.
}

; Function Attrs: norecurse nounwind readnone
define i32 @fun2(i32 %condition, i32 %value) #0 {
  %1 = icmp ne i32 %condition, 0
  %2 = select i1 %1, i32 6, i32 5
  ret i32 %2
}


00000000 <fun0>:
   0:   e3a01005    mov r1, #5
   4:   e3500000    cmp r0, #0
   8:   13a01006    movne   r1, #6
   c:   e1a00001    mov r0, r1
  10:   e12fff1e    bx  lr

00000014 <fun1>:
  14:   e3a01006    mov r1, #6
  18:   e3500000    cmp r0, #0
  1c:   03a01005    moveq   r1, #5
  20:   e1a00001    mov r0, r1
  24:   e12fff1e    bx  lr

00000028 <fun2>:
  28:   e3a01005    mov r1, #5
  2c:   e3500000    cmp r0, #0
  30:   13a01006    movne   r1, #6
  34:   e1a00001    mov r0, r1
  38:   e12fff1e    bx  lr


fun0:
    push.w  r4
    mov.w   r1, r4
    mov.w   r15, r12
    mov.w   #6, r15
    cmp.w   #0, r12
    jne .LBB0_2
    mov.w   #5, r15
.LBB0_2:
    pop.w   r4
    ret

fun1:
    push.w  r4
    mov.w   r1, r4
    mov.w   r15, r12
    mov.w   #5, r15
    cmp.w   #0, r12
    jeq .LBB1_2
    mov.w   #6, r15
.LBB1_2:
    pop.w   r4
    ret


fun2:
    push.w  r4
    mov.w   r1, r4
    mov.w   r15, r12
    mov.w   #6, r15
    cmp.w   #0, r12
    jne .LBB2_2
    mov.w   #5, r15
.LBB2_2:
    pop.w   r4
    ret

Now technically there is a performance difference in some of these solutions, sometimes the result is 5 case has a jump over the result is 6 code, and vice versa, is a branch faster than executing through? one could argue but the execution should vary. But that is more of an if condition vs if not condition in the code resulting in the compiler doing the if this jump over else execute through. but this is not necessarily due to the coding style but the comparison and the if and the else cases in whatever syntax.

0

Ok, since assembly is one of the tags, I will just assume your code is pseudo code (and not necessarily c) and translate it by human into 6502 assembly.

1st Option (without else)

        ldy #$00
        lda #$05
        dey
        bmi false
        lda #$06
false   brk

2nd Option (with else)

        ldy #$00
        dey
        bmi else
        lda #$06
        sec
        bcs end
else    lda #$05
end     brk

Assumptions: Condition is in Y register set this to 0 or 1 on the first line of either option, result will be in accumulator.

So, after counting cycles for both possibilities of each case, we see that the 1st construct is generally faster; 9 cycles when condition is 0 and 10 cycles when condition is 1, whereas option two is also 9 cycles when condition is 0, but 13 cycles when condition is 1. (cycle counts do not include the BRK at the end).

Conclusion: If only is faster than If-Else construct.

And for completeness, here is an optimized value = condition + 5 solution:

ldy #$00
lda #$00
tya
adc #$05
brk

This cuts our time down to 8 cycles (again not including the BRK at the end).

3
  • 6
    Unfortunately for this answer, feeding the same source code into a C compiler (or into a C++ compiler) produces vastly different output than feeding it into Glen's brain. There is no difference, no "optimization" potential, between any of the alternatives at the source code level. Just use the one that's most readable (presumably the if/else one). Apr 6 '17 at 3:08
  • 1
    @Yep. The compiler is either likely to optimize both variants to the fastest version, or likely to add extra overhead that far outweighs the difference between the two. Or both.
    – jpaugh
    Apr 6 '17 at 14:43
  • 1
    Assuming that it's "not necessarily C" does seem a sensible choice, given that the question is tagged as C++ (unfortunately, it doesn't manage to declare the types of the variables involved). Apr 6 '17 at 15:57

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