13

I have two object literals:

var animal = {
    eat: function() {
        console.log("eating...");
    }
}

var dog = {
    eat: "this has to be replaced when merged",
    nrOfLegs: 4
}

Need a merging function like this:

dog = someMergingFunction(animal, dog);

That produces:

{
    eat: function() {
        console.log("eating...");
    },
    nrOfLegs: 4
}

One of the object literals has to replace identical properties.

How do I do this in Javascript?

3
  • In your example, how would someFunction know which eat to keep, and which to discard?
    – Emmett
    Dec 1, 2010 at 2:06
  • maybe the first one would be the overriding object literal. cause when you merge two object one has to win over the other right
    – ajsie
    Dec 1, 2010 at 2:07
  • 1
    @Emmett One option would be to assume that the second passed parameter takes priority over first.
    – Alex
    Dec 1, 2010 at 2:10

9 Answers 9

13

The following should work:

function merge(obj1, obj2) {
  var obj = {};

  for (var x in obj1)
    if (obj1.hasOwnProperty(x))
      obj[x] = obj1[x];

  for (var x in obj2)
    if (obj2.hasOwnProperty(x))
      obj[x] = obj2[x];

  return obj;
}

If both objects have the same property, the value in obj2 takes precedence.

8

I highly recommend jQuery's extend method, as it will provide a full browser support.

var object = $.extend({}, object1, object2, ..., objectN);

Remember that the first argument is the target. The good point about usage of extend is that by following code, you can make it extend recursively:

var object = $.extend(object, object1, object2, ..., objectN);

See the jQuery's documentation for more info: jQuery Docs for Extend method

6
// usage merged = someMergingFunction(a, b, c, d, ...)
// keys in earlier args override keys in later args.
// someMergingFunction({foo:"bar"}, {foo:"baz"})
//  ==> {foo:"bar"}
function someMergingFunction () {
  var o = {}
  for (var i = arguments.length - 1; i >= 0; i --) {
    var s = arguments[i]
    for (var k in s) o[k] = s[k]
  }
  return o
}
4

Assume properties of the first parameter will override properties of the 2nd parameter (as your example), this will do:

function merge(obj1, obj2) {
    for(attr in obj1)
        obj2[attr]=obj1[attr];
    return obj2;
}
4

I recommend using underscore.js as it contains functionality for this and a whole load of related things:

_.extend({name : 'moe'}, {age : 50});
=> {name : 'moe', age : 50}

http://underscorejs.org/#extend

4

As of 2017, I would use Object.assign(foo, bar)

1
  • Please note that. This method is available in ES6, ES5 user need to use old style from above. Nov 19, 2018 at 23:59
4

What about spread syntax ?

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Operators/Spread_syntax

var obj1 = { foo: 'bar', x: 42 };

var obj2 = { foo: 'baz', y: 13 };

var clonedObj = { ...obj1 };
// Object { foo: "bar", x: 42 }

var mergedObj = { ...obj1, ...obj2 };
// Object { foo: "baz", x: 42, y: 13 } 
1
  • Take a moment to read through the editing help in the help center. Formatting on Stack Overflow is different than other sites. I've gone ahead and updated this post (And others have in the past), but please help us in the future by properly formatting your posts.
    – Blue
    Nov 19, 2018 at 23:58
2

This might be swatting a fly with a buick, but you might be interested to see how Dojo does basically the same thing in dojo.mixin (at least if I understood the question correctly).

https://github.com/dojo/dojo/blob/0dddc5a0bfe3708e4ba829434602da51cbb041b7/_base/_loader/bootstrap.js#L277-366

The basic functionality is in dojo._mixin, while dojo.mixin makes it work iteratively for multiple objects progressively in one shot.

Note that dojo.mixin operates in the opposite direction to what you hinted at in your example.

1

There are some good suggestions here.

I know this is a really old question, but for future visitors looking for a slightly more flexible solution, I have a similar function that I wrote that accepts any number of objects in an array and merges them all together and returns a single object with the properties of all of the object literals in the array.

Note: the order of precedence is determined by the array. Each subsequent object will overwrite identical properties if they exist in previous objects. Otherwise, new properties are simply added to the single object that is returned.

I hope this will help future visitors to this question. Here's the function, very short and sweet:

var mergeObjects = function (objectsArray) {
    var result = {};
    for (var i = 0; i < objectsArray.length; i++) {
        for (var obj in objectsArray[i]) {
            if (objectsArray[i].hasOwnProperty(obj)) {
                result[obj] = objectsArray[i][obj];
            };
        };
    };
    return result;
};

You can use it like this:

// Define the mergeObjects function
var mergeObjects = function (objectsArray) {
  var result = {};
  for (var i = 0; i < objectsArray.length; i++) {
    for (var obj in objectsArray[i]) {
      if (objectsArray[i].hasOwnProperty(obj)) {
        result[obj] = objectsArray[i][obj];
      };
    };
  };
  return result;
};


// Define some objects to merge, keeping one property consistent so you can
// see it overwrite the old ones
var obj1 = { test1: "test", overwrite: "overwrite1" };
var obj2 = { test2: "test2", overwrite: "overwrite2" };
var obj3 = { test3: "test3", overwrite: "overwrite3" };

// Merge the objects
var newObject = mergeObjects([obj1, obj2, obj3]);

// Test the output
for (var obj in newObject){
  if (newObject.hasOwnProperty(obj)){
    document.body.innerHTML += newObject[obj] + "<br />";  
  }
}

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