1
(define (nth n lst)
  (if (= n 1)
    (car lst)
    (nth (- n 1)
         (cdr lst) )))

is an unsafe partial function, n may go out of range. An error can be helpful,

(define (nth n lst)
  (if (null? lst)
    (error "`nth` out of range")
    (if (= n 1)
      (car lst)
      (nth (- n 1)
           (cdr lst) ))))

But what would a robust Scheme analogue to Haskell's Maybe data type look like?

data Maybe a = Nothing | Just a

nth :: Int -> [a] -> Maybe a
nth _ []       = Nothing
nth 1 (x : _)  = Just x
nth n (_ : xs) = nth (n - 1) xs

Is just returning '() adequate?

(define (nth n lst)
  (if (null? lst) '()
    (if (= n 1)
      (car lst)
      (nth (- n 1)
           (cdr lst) ))))
  • I would think that signalling a runtime error is robust. – Rainer Joswig Apr 4 '17 at 19:09
  • @rainer-joswig An error may not be unexpected action, but still classifies as abnormal termination. Nobody wants the Cassini orbiter to report an error. – user6428287 Apr 4 '17 at 19:21
  • Not necessary in Lisp, signalling an error may not terminate the program. A runtime out-of range call is abnormal. Handle it. You need to handle it anyway. 'Nobody wants the Cassini orbiter to report an error.' Why not? even spacecrafts have interfaces, logs, etc. Flight software needs to be able to deal with runtime errors, faulty hardware, conflicting computer results, etc. Real flight software accepts that there might be runtime problems and deals with it. – Rainer Joswig Apr 4 '17 at 19:25
  • @rainer-joswig I don't think correspondence with a spacecraft 1.5 billion kilometers from Earth is a good plan B. "Dealing with it" automatically is kind of the point. – user6428287 Apr 4 '17 at 19:46
  • 1
    @GeorgJohannSchubert What makes you think that the Common Lisp condition system does not allow you to deal with exceptional conditions under program control? Because it does. – tfb Apr 4 '17 at 21:01
1

There are several ways to do this.

The direct equivalent would be to mimic the Miranda version:

#!r6rs
(library (sylwester maybe) 
  (export maybe nothing maybe? nothing?)
  (import (rnrs base))

  ;; private tag 
  (define tag-maybe (list 'maybe)) 

  ;; exported tag and features
  (define nothing (list 'nothing))

  (define (maybe? v)
    (and (pair? v) 
         (eq? tag-maybe (car v))))

  (define (nothing? v)
    (and (maybe? v)
         (eq? nothing (cdr v))))

  (define (maybe v)
    (cons tag-maybe v)))

How to use it:

#!r6rs
(import (rnrs) (sylwester maybe))
(define (nth n lst)
  (cond ((null? lst) (maybe nothing))
        ((zero? n) (maybe (car lst)))
        (else (nth (- n 1) (cdr lst)))))

(nothing? (nth 2 '()))
; ==> #t

Exceptions

(define (nth n lst)
  (cond ((null? lst) (raise 'nth-nothing))
        ((zero? n) (car lst))
        (else (nth (- n 1) (cdr lst)))))


(guard (ex
        ((eq? ex 'nth-nothing)
         "nothing-value"))
  (nth 1 '())) ; ==> "nothing-value"

Default value:

(define (nth n lst nothing)
  (cond ((null? lst) nothing)
            ((zero? n) (car lst))
            (else (nth (- n 1) (cdr lst)))))

(nth 1 '() '()) 
; ==> '()

Deault value derived from procedure

(define (nth index lst pnothing)
  (cond ((null? lst) (pnothing))
        ((zero? n) (car lst))
        (else (nth (- n 1) (cdr lst)))))

(nth 1 '() (lambda _ "list too short")) 
; ==> "list too short"

Combination of exception and default procedure

Racket, a Scheme decent, often has a default value option that defaults to an exception or a procedure thunk. It's possible to mimic that behavior:

(define (handle signal rest)
  (if (and (not (null? rest))
           (procedure? (car rest)))
      ((car rest))
      (raise signal)))

(define (nth n lst . nothing)
  (cond ((null? lst) (handle 'nth-nothing nothing)) 
        ((zero? n) (car lst))
        (else (nth (- n 1) (cdr lst)))))

(nth 1 '() (lambda () 5)) ; ==> 5
(nth 1 '()) ; exception signalled
5

It's easy to break your attempt. Just create a list that contains an empty list:

(define lst '((1 2) () (3 4)))
(nth 2 lst)
-> ()
(nth 100 lst)
-> ()

The key point that you're missing is that Haskell's Maybe doesn't simply return a bare value when it exists, it wraps that value. As you said, Haskell defines Maybe like so:

data Maybe a = Nothing | Just a

NOT like this:

data Maybe a = Nothing | a

The latter is the equivalent of what you're doing.

To get most of the way to a proper Maybe, you can return an empty list if the element does not exist, as you were, but also wrap the return value in another list if the element does exist:

(define (nth n lst)
  (if (null? lst) '()
    (if (= n 1)
      (list (car lst)) ; This is the element, wrap it before returning.
      (nth (- n 1)
           (cdr lst) ))))

This way, your result will be either an empty list, meaning the element did not exist, or a list with only one element: the element you asked for. Reusing that same list from above, we can distinguish between the empty list and a non-existant element:

(define lst '((1 2) () (3 4)))
(nth 2 lst)
-> (())
(nth 100 lst)
-> ()
  • Can this <option> ::= "'()" | "(cons " <value> " '())" encoding be considered the standard in robust Lisp programming? Is that even a thing? – user6428287 Apr 4 '17 at 18:07
  • 1
    @GeorgJohannSchubert I'm not sure if I'd call it the standard, but I also haven't been around that much Lisp. As a guess, I'd say it's probably not the standard as I don't think Option types are very commonly used in Lisp, but again, I could be wrong. I do think it's a good candidate to be promoted as the standard (but I'll refrain from claiming it's the best without studying the various Lisps type systems in more detail). Being that both variants are lists, it works well with standard functions like map, allowing you to perform operations without checking if there's actually a value or not. – 8bittree Apr 4 '17 at 18:30
  • 1
    @GeorgJohannSchubert One way to figure out if this is a good choice is to check with your teammates or friends to see if they can understand what you're doing and why, preferably with as little extra explanation on your part as possible. If they get it right away, you might be onto something. If they're confused, especially after an explanation, you may want to look for a more idiomatic approach (possibly that error). – 8bittree Apr 4 '17 at 18:35
2

Another way to signal, that no matching element was found, would be to use multiple return values:

(define (nth n ls)
  (cond
    ((null? ls) (values #f #f))
    ((= n 1) (values (car ls) #t))
    (else (nth (- n 1) ls))))

This comes at the expense of being a little bit cumbersome for the users of this function, since they now have to do a

(call-with-values (lambda () (nth some-n some-list))
                  (lambda (element found?)
                     ... whatever ...))

but that can be alleviated by using some careful macrology. R7RS specifies the let-values syntax.

(let-values (((element found?) (nth some-n some-list)))
   ... whatever ...)
1

As a non-lisper I really can't say how idiomatic this is, but you could return the Church encoding of an option type:

(define (nth n ls)
  (cond
    ((null? ls) (lambda (default f) default))
    ((= n 1) (lambda (default f) (f (car ls))))
    (else (nth (- n 1) ls))))

But that's about as complicated to use as @Dirk's proposal. I'd personally prefer to just add a default argument to nth itself.

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