2

In my backend I have an interface which defines two types:

public class FilterRange
{
    public double? Min { get; set; }

    public double? Max { get; set; }
}

public class FilterRange<T> where T : struct
{
    public T? Min { get; set; }

    public T? Max { get; set; }
}

The first class is a legacy class. The second one is a new class I defined just now, so that I may use other types than doubles (ints in this instance).

In the front end I have a view model for the legacy class:

public class FilterRangeBaseViewModel<T> : ViewModelBase<T>, IDataErrorInfo
    where T: FilterRange, new()
{
    public FilterRangeBaseViewModel(T model)
        : this(model, "F2")
    {
    }

    public FilterRangeBaseViewModel(T model, string formatString)
        : base(model)
    {
        this.FormatString = formatString;

        CreateErrorDictionary();
        SetTextValues();
    }

    // More code below

}

public class FilterRangeViewModel : FilterRangeBaseViewModel<FilterRange>
{
    public FilterRangeViewModel(FilterRange model)
        : base(model)
    {
    }

    public FilterRangeViewModel(FilterRange model, string formatString)
        : base(model, formatString)
    {
    }
}

I'm struggling to defined the FilterRangeViewModelBase so that I can be used with my new generic FilterRange class.

I thought something like

public class FilterRangeBaseViewModel<T> : ViewModelBase<T>, IDataErrorInfo
    where T: FilterRange<U> where U : struct, new()

might work, but it doesn't.

What is the correct definition for my view model?

7
  • Are you sure you want to use generic types where primitive data types are expected such as (int,double, short and etc.)? – kuskmen Apr 5 '17 at 8:36
  • 1
    I would consider doing overloading instead of generics in this case , but it is your choice I am just wondering whats the idea of your outcome :) – kuskmen Apr 5 '17 at 9:03
  • 1
    @kuskmen You were right. Now that I got the definition right I see the problems with this approach. It's doable, but a lot of trouble for little benefit. – yu_ominae Apr 5 '17 at 9:14
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    Yes , exactly that I meant. This type T you're introducing you will eventually want to threat like primitive data type , but this isn't so easy runtime so you have to do some explicit casts and checks and stuff that will pollute your code which in my opinion will crash the idea of generics , because generics are about code readability and reusability in my opinion. :) – kuskmen Apr 5 '17 at 9:17
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    @kuskmen Thanks to you I leaned something very valuable today :) – yu_ominae Apr 5 '17 at 9:23
5

You need to define both T and U in your class type arguments.

public class FilterRangeBaseViewModel<T, U> : ViewModelBase<T>, IDataErrorInfo
where T: FilterRange<U>, new() where U : struct

Edited as per comments.

5
  • 2
    Do note that the new() constraint is redundant; you don't need it, structs are guaranteed to have a parameterless constructor. – InBetween Apr 5 '17 at 8:44
  • If it's to mirror the existing base with a non-generic FilterRange, the new() should be on T, not U. – Damien_The_Unbeliever Apr 5 '17 at 8:48
  • @Damien_The_Unbeliever Yes, that's exactly it. – yu_ominae Apr 5 '17 at 9:01
  • So, if I do this, I have to lose the new() constraint? That's not good as there is a method in the class which return a new T class (T is a FilterRange). Any suggestions on how to get around that limitation? Can I specify for the struct constraint to only apply to the U parameter? – yu_ominae Apr 5 '17 at 9:03
  • 1
    Yes, just move the new() constraint back to the T constraint list. – christophano Apr 5 '17 at 9:05

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