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I created a list of N numpy arrays in Python, each of which is size D by P. When I call numpy.shape(my_list), I get back the tuple (N, D, P). When the arrays that I append to my list are not the same size (or if I append items that are not arrays), numpy.shape throws an error.

  1. If I want the shape of each array in the list, do I have to resort to list comprehension or is there a faster way to do this?
  2. Does numpy simply iterate through the list, checking to make sure that each element is an array of the same size as the previous one, and decide based on that whether to return a tuple or throw an error?
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  • 1) yes, 2) probably – juanpa.arrivillaga Apr 5 '17 at 17:00
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    List is not a numpy data type. There is no "numpy" way of iterating through it, so list comprehension is the only option. When you call numpy.shape(my_list), an array of arrays is implicitly created. For this operation to be successful, all arrays on the list must have the same shape. – DYZ Apr 5 '17 at 17:05
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    Note that my_list.shape would have given you an error. It's the function form that tries to turn the list into an array. – hpaulj Apr 5 '17 at 19:36
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If I want the shape of each array in the list, do I have to resort to list comprehension or is there a faster way to do this?

List comprehension.

Does numpy simply iterate through the list, checking to make sure that each element is an array of the same size as the previous one, and decide based on that whether to return a tuple or throw an error?

NumPy calls asarray on the list, building an entire array just to get the shape. (This is not something that anyone has bothered to optimize.)

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  • Isn't map(np.shape, list_of_arrays) faster than list comprehension? – kmario23 Apr 5 '17 at 20:27
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    @kmario23: It might be trivially faster, but both ways are very close to each other in runtime, and neither way will make this operation a performance bottleneck. Also, accessing the shape attribute directly will be faster than using np.shape, and you can't do that with map. (Accessing the shape attribute directly would be [arr.shape for arr in my_list].) – user2357112 supports Monica Apr 5 '17 at 20:35
  • Yeah. Found out that after running some tests. Btw, I supplied a custom python function to map that utilizes arr.shape and found out it's 2x slow when compared to list comprehension. But, if one needs just an iterable and not the whole list per se, then map is the way to go. – kmario23 Apr 5 '17 at 20:43

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