15

I've seen several similar questions about how to generate all possible combinations of elements in an array. But I'm having a very hard time figuring out how to write an algorithm that will only output combination pairs. Any suggestions would be super appreciated!

Starting with the following array (with N elements):

var array = ["apple", "banana", "lemon", "mango"];

And getting the following result:

var result = [
   "apple banana"
   "apple lemon"
   "apple mango"
   "banana lemon"
   "banana mango"
   "lemon mango"
];

I was trying out the following approach but this results in all possible combinations, instead only combination pairs.

var letters = splSentences;
var combi = [];
var temp= "";
var letLen = Math.pow(2, letters.length);

for (var i = 0; i < letLen ; i++){
    temp= "";
    for (var j=0;j<letters.length;j++) {
        if ((i & Math.pow(2,j))){ 
            temp += letters[j]+ " "
        }
    }
    if (temp !== "") {
        combi.push(temp);
    }
}
18

A simple way would be to do a double for loop over the array where you skip the first i elements in the second loop.

let array = ["apple", "banana", "lemon", "mango"];
let results = [];

// Since you only want pairs, there's no reason
// to iterate over the last element directly
for (let i = 0; i < array.length - 1; i++) {
  // This is where you'll capture that last value
  for (let j = i + 1; j < array.length; j++) {
    results.push(`${array[i]} ${array[j]}`);
  }
}

console.log(results);

Rewritten with ES5:

var array = ["apple", "banana", "lemon", "mango"];
var results = [];

// Since you only want pairs, there's no reason
// to iterate over the last element directly
for (var i = 0; i < array.length - 1; i++) {
  // This is where you'll capture that last value
  for (var j = i + 1; j < array.length; j++) {
    results.push(array[i] + ' ' + array[j]);
  }
}

console.log(results);

18

Here are some functional programming solutions:

Using EcmaScript2019's flatMap:

var array = ["apple", "banana", "lemon", "mango"];

var result = array.flatMap(
    (v, i) => array.slice(i+1).map( w => v + ' ' + w )
);

console.log(result);

Before the introduction of flatMap (my answer in 2017), you would go for reduce or [].concat(...) in order to flatten the array:

var array = ["apple", "banana", "lemon", "mango"];

var result = array.reduce( (acc, v, i) =>
    acc.concat(array.slice(i+1).map( w => v + ' ' + w )),
[]);

console.log(result);

Or:

var array = ["apple", "banana", "lemon", "mango"];

var result = [].concat(...array.map( 
    (v, i) => array.slice(i+1).map( w => v + ' ' + w ))
);

console.log(result);

  • 1
    Add some spread operator for more beauty instead of concat(). :D – SrAxi Mar 6 '18 at 15:42
  • Your second answer is better written using flatMap() in order to not have nested arrays of subsets: result = [...array.flatMap((v1,i) => array.slice(i+1).map(v2 => v1+' '+v1))] – Phrogz Oct 12 at 23:20
  • 1
    Thanks for your comment, @Phrogz. I updated my answer. When I wrote this answer in 2017, flatMap was not yet widely available. NB: here there is no need to spread the result of flatMap. – trincot Oct 13 at 6:48
8

Although solutions have been found, I post here an algorithm for general case to find all combinations size n of m (m>n) elements. In your case, we have n=2 and m=4.

const result = [];
result.length = 2; //n=2

function combine(input, len, start) {
  if(len === 0) {
    console.log( result.join(" ") ); //process here the result
    return;
  }
  for (var i = start; i <= input.length - len; i++) {
    result[result.length - len] = input[i];
    combine(input, len-1, i+1 );
  }
}

const array = ["apple", "banana", "lemon", "mango"];    
combine( array, result.length, 0);

1

Using map and flatMap the following can be done (flatMap is only supported on chrome and firefox)

var array = ["apple", "banana", "lemon", "mango"]
array.flatMap(x => array.map(y => x !== y ? x + ' ' + y : null)).filter(x => x)
0

Try this: https://jsfiddle.net/e2dLa9v6/

var array = ["apple", "banana", "lemon", "mango"];
var result = [];

for(var i=0;i<array.length-1;i++){
    for(var j=i+1;j<array.length;j++){
    result.push(array[i]+" "+array[j]);
  }
}
for(var i=0;i<result.length;i++){
    alert(result[i]);
}
0

Generating combinations of elements in an array is a lot like counting in a numeral system, where the base is the number of elements in your array (if you account for the leading zeros that will be missing).

This gives you all the indices to your array (concatenated):

arr = ["apple", "banana", "lemon", "mango"]
base = arr.length

idx = [...Array(Math.pow(base, base)).keys()].map(x => x.toString(base))

You are only interested in pairs of two, so restrict the range accordingly:

range = (from, to) = [...Array(to).keys()].map(el => el + from)
indices = range => range.map(x => x.toString(base).padStart(2,"0"))

indices( range( 0, Math.pow(base, 2))) // range starts at 0, single digits are zero-padded.

Now what's left to do is map indices to values.

As you don't want elements paired with themselves and order doesn't matter, those need to be removed, before mapping to the final result.

const range = (from, to) => [...Array(to).keys()].map(el => el + from)
const combinations = arr => {
  const base = arr.length
  return range(0, Math.pow(base, 2))
    .map(x => x.toString(base).padStart(2, "0"))
    .filter(i => !i.match(/(\d)\1/) && i === i.split('').sort().join(''))
    .map(i => arr[i[0]] + " " + arr[i[1]])
}

console.log(combinations(["apple", "banana", "lemon", "mango"]))

With more than ten elements, toString() will return letters for indices; also, this will only work with up to 36 Elements.

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