34

I'm using aiohttp to build an API server that sends TCP requests off to a seperate server. The module that sends the TCP requests is synchronous and a black box for my purposes. So my problem is that these requests are blocking the entire API. I need a way to wrap the module requests in an asynchronous coroutine that won't block the rest of the API.

So, just using sleep as a simple example, is there any way to somehow wrap time-consuming synchronous code in a non-blocking coroutine, something like this:

async def sleep_async(delay):
    # After calling sleep, loop should be released until sleep is done
    yield sleep(delay)
    return 'I slept asynchronously'
  • 1
    You always block on I/O. With cooperative multitasking you can't get desired behaviour, because blocked coroutine returns control (yield) only after request is finished. – Dmitry Shilyaev Apr 5 '17 at 21:03
  • 1
    aiohttp is good for http. For non http TCP, asyncio is enough. – Udi Apr 5 '17 at 22:13
30

Eventually I found an answer in this thread. The method I was looking for is run_in_executor. This allows a synchronous function to be run asynchronously without blocking an event loop.

In the sleep example I posted above, it might look like this:

import asyncio
from time import sleep

async def sleep_async(loop, delay):
    # None uses the default executor (ThreadPoolExecutor)
    await loop.run_in_executor(None, sleep, delay)
    return 'I slept asynchronously'

Also see the following answer -> How do we call a normal function where a coroutine is expected?

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  • 13
    ProcessPoolExecutor has a high cost because it launches an entire new python interpreter. It is used when you have a CPU-intensive task that needs to use multiple processors. Consider using ThreadPoolExecutor instead, which uses threading. – Oleg Jun 11 '17 at 1:38
  • 5
    Thank you for the additional info. Although the original example used process pool, ThreadPoolExecutor is what I ended up using after a little more research. Still seems a little jenky, but so far it's all holding together. – Zac Delventhal Jun 14 '17 at 3:34
  • 9
    Just a note, instead of creating a new executor, it might be simpler to use the default executor by calling loop.run_in_executor(executor=None, func, *args) (see documentation). – Amit Kotlovski Jan 18 '18 at 8:51
  • To get the event loop, one can do loop = asyncio.get_event_loop() – Pax Apr 5 at 23:16
15

You can use a decorator to wrap the sync version to an async version.

import time
from functools import wraps, partial


def wrap(func):
    @wraps(func)
    async def run(*args, loop=None, executor=None, **kwargs):
        if loop is None:
            loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
        pfunc = partial(func, *args, **kwargs)
        return await loop.run_in_executor(executor, pfunc)
    return run

@wrap
def sleep_async(delay):
    time.sleep(delay)
    return 'I slept asynchronously'

or use the aioify library

% pip install aioify

then

@aioify
def sleep_async(delay):
    pass
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  • good advise to use aioify it makes now so easy to write async functions and modules :) – WBAR Feb 26 '19 at 23:46
0

Not sure if too late but you can also use a decorator to do your function in a thread. ALTHOUGH, note that it will still be non-coop blocking unlike async which is co-op blocking.

def wrap(func):
    from concurrent.futures import ThreadPoolExecutor
    pool=ThreadPoolExecutor()
    @wraps(func)
    async def run(*args, loop=None, executor=None, **kwargs):
        if loop is None:
            loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
        future=pool.submit(func, *args, **kwargs)
        return asyncio.wrap_future(future)
    return run
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