15

If I want to make the following work on Windows, what is the correct locale and how do I detect that it is actually present: Does this code work universaly, or is it just my system?

10

Basically, you are out of luck: http://www.siao2.com/2007/01/03/1392379.aspx

  • 2
    @MSalters: The point of the blog is that code page 65001 cannot be an ACP, which means it cannot be used as a C++ standard library locale. The UTF-8 <> UTF-16 conversion I mention is not the point of the blog, but my answer to the question how to use UTF-8 on Windows. A shorter answer would be: don't use C++ Standard library for IO on Windows. – Nemanja Trifunovic Dec 2 '10 at 16:42
  • 1
    @Let_Me_Be: Basically, this boils down to the fact that wchar_t on Windows is specifically defined as a 16-bit type. The C (and C++) standards require wchar_t to be able to hold any valid character from all supported encodings. But there is no way to encode all of the Unicode characters in 16 bits -- it just can't be done. Therefore, the Windows C and C++ libraries do not actually support Unicode of any kind. If you want to use Unicode on Windows, you have to go outside the C and C++ libraries. Yes, it's stupid, but what did you expect from Microsoft? :P – Dan Moulding Dec 2 '10 at 17:39
  • 1
    @Let_Me_Be: You are confusing 16 bit wchar_t and UTF-16. They are not the same thing. UTF-8 and UTF-16 are two different ways of encoding all of the Unicode code points (of which there are far more than just 65535). You need at least 24 bits to represent all 1,000,000+ Unicode code points. The "16" in UTF-16 does not mean that all characters representable using only 16 bits (for instance some Unicode characters require 32 bits [two 16-bit code units ] when encoded using UTF-16). But the C++ library requires wchar_t to be able to uniquely represent every supported character. – Dan Moulding Dec 2 '10 at 18:43
  • 1
    @Let_Me_Be: No, conversion to wchar_t is not the same as conversion to UTF-16. That's precisely what I'm trying to explain (although, probably not as well as I'd like). Some UTF-16 characters are going to need more than 16 bits to be able to represent them. wchar_t, being only 16-bits on Windows, can therefore not represent those characters. Again, the C standard requires that wchar_t be able to uniquely represent every supported character. – Dan Moulding Dec 2 '10 at 19:05
  • 2
    @Let_Me_Be: I did read your linked question, but it seems that you didn't understand the correct answer there. Some (or even all) of the Windows APIs may interpret wchar_t strings as UTF-16 encoded data but the C and C++ libraries do not. If they did, then you could use UTF-8 as a locale for the C and C++ libraries. But, you can't. And that is the answer to your question here ;) – Dan Moulding Dec 3 '10 at 14:52
12

Although there isn't good support for named locales, Visual Studio 2010 does include the UTF-8 conversion facets required by C++11: std::codecvt_utf8 for UCS2 and std::codecvt_utf8_utf16 for UTF-16:

#include <fstream>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <locale>
#include <codecvt>
void prepare_file()
{
    // UTF-8 data
    char utf8[] = {'\x7a',                       // latin small letter 'z' U+007a
                   '\xe6','\xb0','\xb4',         // CJK ideograph "water"  U+6c34
                   '\xf0','\x9d','\x84','\x8b'}; // musical sign segno U+1d10b
    std::ofstream fout("text.txt");
    fout.write(utf8, sizeof utf8);
}
void test_file_utf16()
{
    std::wifstream fin("text.txt");
    fin.imbue(std::locale(fin.getloc(), new std::codecvt_utf8_utf16<wchar_t>));
    std::cout << "Read from file using UTF-8/UTF-16 codecvt\n";
    for(wchar_t c; fin >> c; )
        std::cout << std::hex << std::showbase << c << '\n';
}
void test_file_ucs2()
{
    std::wifstream fin("text.txt");
    fin.imbue(std::locale(fin.getloc(), new std::codecvt_utf8<wchar_t>));
    std::cout << "Read from file using UTF-8/UCS2 codecvt\n";
    for(wchar_t c; fin >> c; )
        std::cout << std::hex << std::showbase << c << '\n';
}
int main()
{
    prepare_file();
    test_file_utf16();
    test_file_ucs2();
}

this outputs, on my Visual Studio 2010 EE SP1

Read from file using UTF-8/UTF-16 codecvt
0x7a
0x6c34
0xd834
0xdd0b
Read from file using UTF-8/UCS2 codecvt
0x7a
0x6c34
0xd10b
Press any key to continue . . .
1

Per MSDN, it would be named "english_us.65001". But code page 65001 is somewhat flaky on Windows.

  • 2
    Can you please comment more on the "somewhat flaky"? – Let_Me_Be Dec 1 '10 at 16:00
  • @Let_Me_Be: I can't summarize it better than google.com/search?q=site%3Ablogs.msdn.com+65001 – MSalters Dec 2 '10 at 12:32
  • 1
    @MSalters I'm sorry but I just can't find anything both current and detailed enough. What I understand from the short blog posts I read is that Windows doesn't have UTF-8 support at all (which just doesn't make any sense). – Let_Me_Be Dec 2 '10 at 12:41
  • @Let_Me_Be: It doesn't have implicit support. You can't call MessageBoxA("Hellö"). However, it has explicit support: MultiByteToWideChar(CP_UTF8, MB_ERR_INVALID_CHARS, utf8input.c_str(), ... – MSalters Dec 2 '10 at 16:31
  • 7
    @Let_Me_Be: What all these answers try to say is that there is no utf-8 locale on windows. – Doub Mar 14 '11 at 13:58

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