1

An employee is involved in up to 3 projects in a week and in each of those projects, the employee can perform 2 different tasks. I'm using union all to join separate fields from a single table so I get a separate row for each task performed (up to 6 rows per employee). This will eventually join to the clock in system so the amount we pay each employee can be assigned to tasks on certain projects so we can better track where money is going.

I need a means to count the amount of tasks (so counting the number of rows for each employee) so I have a number to divide by.

I've tried a group by and count in several locations but it just shows 1 (presumably because there is no unique field within the selection (each row is unique but that doesn't seem to help?)).

Should I be doing the count on a specific field? or is there another way?

Current SQL Query

DECLARE @WeekCommencing date = '2017-04-03'

select SageID, a.EmployeeID, a.ProjectID, a.TaskID, a.FlatRate, a.PayRate from 
(   Select distinct Employee.SageID, EmployeeProject.EmployeeID, EmployeeProject.ProjectID, EmployeeProject.TaskID, Employee.FlatRate, Employee.PayRate from 
    (   Select EmployeeID, ProjectID1 as ProjectID, Project1TaskID1 as TaskID, WeekCommencing 
        FROM ProjectEmployee 
        WHERE ProjectID1 is not null and Project1TaskID1 is null
            union all
        Select EmployeeID, ProjectID1 as ProjectID, Project1TaskID1 as TaskID, WeekCommencing 
        FROM ProjectEmployee 
        WHERE ProjectID1 is not null and Project1TaskID1 is not null    
            union all
        Select EmployeeID, ProjectID1 as ProjectID, Project1TaskID2 as TaskID, WeekCommencing 
        FROM ProjectEmployee 
        WHERE ProjectID1 is not null and Project1TaskID2 is not null
            union all
        Select EmployeeID, ProjectID2 as ProjectID, Project2TaskID1 as TaskID, WeekCommencing 
        FROM ProjectEmployee 
        WHERE ProjectID2 is not null and Project2TaskID1 is null
            union all
        Select EmployeeID, ProjectID2 as ProjectID, Project2TaskID1 as TaskID, WeekCommencing 
        FROM ProjectEmployee 
        WHERE ProjectID2 is not null and Project2TaskID1 is not null    
            union all
        Select EmployeeID, ProjectID2 as ProjectID, Project2TaskID2 as TaskID, WeekCommencing 
        FROM ProjectEmployee 
        WHERE ProjectID2 is not null and Project2TaskID2 is not null        
            union all
        Select EmployeeID, ProjectID3 as ProjectID, Project3TaskID1 as TaskID, WeekCommencing 
        FROM ProjectEmployee 
        WHERE ProjectID3 is not null and Project3TaskID1 is null
            union all
        Select EmployeeID, ProjectID3 as ProjectID, Project3TaskID1 as TaskID, WeekCommencing 
        FROM ProjectEmployee 
        WHERE ProjectID3 is not null and Project3TaskID1 is not null    
            union all
        Select EmployeeID, ProjectID3 as ProjectID, Project3TaskID2 as TaskID, WeekCommencing 
        FROM ProjectEmployee 
        WHERE ProjectID3 is not null and Project3TaskID2 is not null    
    ) as EmployeeProject 

    inner join 
    Employee on EmployeeProject.EmployeeID = Employee.EmployeeID
    where WeekCommencing = @WeekCommencing
) as a

inner join

(   Select ProjectEmployeeID, EmployeeID from -- remove duplicates if info is inserted multiple times
    (   Select ProjectEmployeeID, EmployeeID, ROW_NUMBER() OVER(PARTITION BY EmployeeID ORDER BY ProjectEmployeeID DESC) EmployeeDup 
        FROM ProjectEmployee
    ) a
    WHERE EmployeeDup = 1
) as c

on a.EmployeeID =  c.EmployeeID

Order by a.flatrate, a.SageID

Current Values in the ProjectEmployee table Current Values in the ProjectEmployee table Current Output from above query Current Output from above query

I should add - the desired output is the same as the second image (above) but with an extra column called LineCount

LineCount
5
5
5
5
5
2
2
1
2
2
  • Please, read stackoverflow.com/help/mcve. – jarlh Apr 6 '17 at 9:00
  • Why do you have queries with WHERE ProjectID1 is not null and Project1TaskID1 is null and WHERE ProjectID1 is not null and Project1TaskID1 is not null. Doesn't a query with WHERE ProjectID1 is not null cover all cases in that scenario? – Jens Apr 6 '17 at 9:00
  • I think you repeated some union all in your query... Moreover, it would be extremely useful if you post some sample data (CREATE and INSERT scripts) – etsa Apr 6 '17 at 9:05
  • Or you should just go with select MAX(PayRate) for every employee ;) – Veljko89 Apr 6 '17 at 9:08
  • @jarlh apologies, I will take note in future – hero9989 Apr 6 '17 at 9:38
0

Is this what you are looking for?

I added COUNT(*) OVER (PARTITION BY SAGEID, A.EmployeeID) AS RC and modified the UNION ALL as Jean too suggested

DECLARE @WeekCommencing date = '2017-04-03'

select SageID, a.EmployeeID, a.ProjectID, a.TaskID, a.FlatRate, a.PayRate, COUNT(*) OVER (PARTITION BY SAGEID, A.EmployeeID) AS RC
from (   Select distinct Employee.SageID, EmployeeProject.EmployeeID, EmployeeProject.ProjectID, EmployeeProject.TaskID, Employee.FlatRate, Employee.PayRate 
         from (      
            Select EmployeeID, ProjectID1 as ProjectID, Project1TaskID1 as TaskID, WeekCommencing 
            FROM ProjectEmployee 
            WHERE ProjectID1 is not null  
                union all
            Select EmployeeID, ProjectID1 as ProjectID, Project1TaskID2 as TaskID, WeekCommencing 
            FROM ProjectEmployee 
            WHERE ProjectID1 is not null and Project1TaskID2 is not null
                union all
            Select EmployeeID, ProjectID2 as ProjectID, Project2TaskID1 as TaskID, WeekCommencing 
            FROM ProjectEmployee 
            WHERE ProjectID2 is not null  
                union all
            Select EmployeeID, ProjectID2 as ProjectID, Project2TaskID2 as TaskID, WeekCommencing 
            FROM ProjectEmployee 
            WHERE ProjectID2 is not null and Project2TaskID2 is not null        
                union all
            Select EmployeeID, ProjectID3 as ProjectID, Project3TaskID1 as TaskID, WeekCommencing 
            FROM ProjectEmployee 
            WHERE ProjectID3 is not null 
                union all
            Select EmployeeID, ProjectID3 as ProjectID, Project3TaskID2 as TaskID, WeekCommencing 
            FROM ProjectEmployee 
            WHERE ProjectID3 is not null and Project3TaskID2 is not null        
              ) AS EMPLOYEEPROJECT 
        INNER JOIN EMPLOYEE ON EMPLOYEEPROJECT.EMPLOYEEID = EMPLOYEE.EMPLOYEEID
        WHERE WeekCommencing = @WeekCommencing
    ) AS A
INNER JOIN (SELECT ProjectEmployeeID, EmployeeID 
            from -- remove duplicates if info is inserted multiple times
            (   Select ProjectEmployeeID, EmployeeID, ROW_NUMBER() OVER(PARTITION BY EmployeeID ORDER BY ProjectEmployeeID DESC) EmployeeDup 
                FROM ProjectEmployee
            ) a
            WHERE EmployeeDup = 1
           ) AS C ON A.EMPLOYEEID =  C.EMPLOYEEID    
Order by a.flatrate, a.SageID
  • The count is spot on, exactly what I was after. I see what you mean about the union alls, I can remove one, but not the one you suggested. Somebody can work on a project and only perform 1 kind of task for the whole week. or somebody can work on a project and perform 2 kinds of task. They cannot however work on a project and do no tasks. – hero9989 Apr 6 '17 at 9:32

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