1

I have a pointer "a", it is of type A*. I now that there is n objects of type A at that address and I want to iterate over them.

I would like to cast it to A[n], so that I can use the c++11 range-for and write for (auto temp : a){...}. Of course, I can use a classic for(int i=0; i<n; i++) {temp=a[i]; ...} but the range-for is cleaner.

  • 3
    Do yourself a favor and use std::array instead. – nwp Apr 6 '17 at 13:06
  • The size is unkown at compile-time, I used n as example. – user2370139 Apr 6 '17 at 13:08
  • 2
    Use an std::vector then. – nwp Apr 6 '17 at 13:08
  • @user2370139 C++ does not allow you to cast a raw pointer to an array type . So no. You need to implement this solution: stackoverflow.com/a/12444983/126769 – nos Apr 6 '17 at 13:10
  • 2
    You could use a gsl::span – NathanOliver Apr 6 '17 at 13:13
5

Yes you can do.

// allocate an array of one int[2] dynamically
// and store a pointer to it
int(*p)[2] = new int[1][2];

// now initialize a reference to it
int(&array)[2] = *p;

// delete the array once you no longer need it
delete[] p;
  • That's a nice clever trick. I hadn't though of that. Have an upvote. – Bathsheba Apr 6 '17 at 13:20
  • 1
    Happy to help. thanks – Ajay Kumar Apr 6 '17 at 13:21
  • 3
    I can't help thinking this will give some WTF moments at a code review... – Karoly Horvath Apr 6 '17 at 13:28
  • 1
    Yeah, don't do this. – Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 6 '17 at 13:44
1

In reasonable code, I'd shy away from it. But C++ allows you to commit acts of sheer devilry. In that vein, I offer a solution:

At the expense of some considerable obfuscation, you can write some preparatory templates:

namespace std
{
    template <typename T> T* begin(std::pair<T*, T*> const& a)
    {
        return a.first;
    }

    template <typename T> T* end(std::pair<T*, T*> const& a)
    {
        return a.second;
    }
}

Then you can write something like

for (auto&& i : std::make_pair(a, a + n)){

}

The template stuff brings in suitable definitions of begin and end which is required by the range for loop.

  • 1
    Isn't it UB to add these overloads into the std namespace? – NathanOliver Apr 6 '17 at 13:18
  • 1
    Not, I think, for template specialisations; even partial ones. Cf std::hash. Perhaps an expert can confirm. – Bathsheba Apr 6 '17 at 13:18
  • I think that who worked on standard should think about using result of std::equal_range in for range loop. – Slava Apr 6 '17 at 13:19
  • 1
    @NathanOliver: [C++14: 17.6.4.2.1/1] looks ok iff T is user-defined. – Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 6 '17 at 13:45
  • @BoundaryImposition: But we cannot add this restriction on T (via std::enable_iffor example :-/) – Jarod42 Apr 6 '17 at 14:07

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