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I am trying to solve the following task :

Each cell in a 2D grid contains either a wall ('W') or an enemy ('E'), or is empty ('0'). Bombs can destroy enemies, but walls are too strong to be destroyed. A bomb placed in an empty cell destroys all enemies in the same row and column, but the destruction stops once it hits a wall.

Return the maximum number of enemies you can destroy using one bomb.

Note that your solution should have O(field.length · field[0].length) complexity because this is what you will be asked during an interview.

Example

For

field = [["0", "0", "E", "0"],
         ["W", "0", "W", "E"],
         ["0", "E", "0", "W"],
         ["0", "W", "0", "E"]]

the output should be bomber(field) = 2.

Placing a bomb at (0, 1) or at (0, 3) destroys 2 enemies.

I implemented a naive solution, but it has O(n^2) complexity(n = width*height). How can I get it to O(n)? The task is tagged "greedy", so there probably is a greedy approach that works. Here's the naive solution:

def bomber(field):

    if len(field) < 1:
        return 0

    h = len(field)
    w = len(field[0])
    max_enemies = 0

    for row in range(h):
        for col in range(w):

            if field[row][col] == "0":
                cur_max = 0
                cur_row = row
                cur_col = col

                while cur_row >= 0:
                    if field[cur_row][col] == "W":
                        break
                    if field[cur_row][col] == "E":
                        cur_max += 1
                    cur_row -= 1

                cur_row = row    

                while cur_row < h:
                    if field[cur_row][col] == "W":
                        break
                    if field[cur_row][col] == "E":
                        cur_max += 1
                    cur_row += 1

                cur_row = row

                while cur_col >= 0:
                    if field[row][cur_col] == "W":
                        break
                    if field[row][cur_col] == "E":
                        cur_max += 1
                    cur_col -= 1

                cur_col = col

                while cur_col < w:
                    if field[row][cur_col] == "W":
                        break
                    if field[row][cur_col] == "E":
                        cur_max += 1
                    cur_col += 1


                if cur_max > max_enemies:
                    max_enemies = cur_max

    return max_enemies 
  • 1
    Try to make an array the same size as the input, recording how many enemies would be killed horizontally by a bomb at each position. Can you figure out how to do this in O(n) time? Next, can you do the same thing for vertical kills? Next, can you use these two arrays to compute the output you need? – user2357112 Apr 6 '17 at 21:25
  • Incidentally, I don't see any part of this problem where a greedy algorithm would be appropriate. The solution I have in mind doesn't have a greedy component, as far as I can see. – user2357112 Apr 6 '17 at 21:35
2

If you consider a single row, you can determine, how many enemies (in the same row) are visible in each square in the row in linear time.

def ranges(c):
    i = 0
    while True:
        while i < len(c) and c[i] == "W":
            i += 1
        if i == len(c):
            return
        start = i
        enemies = 0
        while i < len(c) and c[i] != "W":
            if c[i] == "E":
                enemies += 1
            i += 1
        yield range(start, i), enemies

def enemies(c):
    answer = [0] * len(c)
    for r, enemies in ranges(c):
        for i in r:
            answer[i] = enemies
    return answer

Here the ranges function returns contiguous ranges of "0" or "E", with the number of enemies in each range. Then enemies uses these ranges to construct a vector which shows how many enemies are visible per square.

For example:

>>> print enemies(["0", "E", "0", "E", "W", "0", "0", "W", "E"])
[2, 2, 2, 2, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1]

Using this, we can construct vectors for each row and column, and then find the max in O(W*H) time. The code uses a trick: zip(*grid) is the transpose of grid.

def best(grid):
    rows = [enemies(c) for c in grid]
    cols = [enemies(c) for c in zip(*grid)]
    return max(rows[i][j] + cols[j][i]
            for i in xrange(len(grid))
            for j in xrange(len(grid[0]))
            if grid[i][j] == '0')

And a test to make sure this is working:

field = [["0", "0", "E", "0"],
         ["W", "0", "W", "E"],
         ["0", "E", "0", "W"],
         ["0", "W", "0", "E"]]

print best(field)
  • 1
    Next up: reducing the space consumption. It's simple to compute horizontal kills for each row as you reach it. If you keep vertical kill information from the previous row and only update it when you hit a wall, you can keep only one row's worth of vertical kill info at a time and still complete the overall algorithm in O(len(grid)*len(grid[0])) time. – user2357112 Apr 6 '17 at 21:49
  • 2
    Also: you can't put a bomb inside an enemy. That needs handling. – user2357112 Apr 6 '17 at 21:50
  • @user2357112 Thanks -- I missed that (bombs must be placed in empty squares) in the description. Fixed – Paul Hankin Apr 6 '17 at 23:03
  • @user2357112 the idea about reducing space seems clever, but I don't see how it works. You have to scan each row/column twice so that each square sees enemies on both sides of it, but I can't figure out how to combine rows and columns without using O(WH) space. I can see how to halve the memory use (by adding the by-cols data directly into the by-rows data), but I don't think that's what you mean. – Paul Hankin Apr 6 '17 at 23:09
  • Start with the first row, and compute how many enemies would be killed vertically by a bomb in each space. Every time you go down a row, keep the vertical kill info for columns where both the old and new cells are non-walls. If going down a row puts you inside a wall for some column, set vertical kills for that column to zero. If going down a row takes you out of a wall for some column, compute vertical kills again for that column. – user2357112 Apr 6 '17 at 23:11

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