2

I have a callback callable that was calculated inside exec().

I have _globals and _locals that were used in this exec(). There is a value with a key variable_from_context in _locals.

But when I try to call the callback(), it's executed in the current context, and not in its original context. It cannot find variable_from_context.

exec() only takes a str or a code object. I found this way to access the callback's code object, and trying to invoke this:

exec(callback.__code__, scenario._globals, scenario._locals)

But again, I get NameError: name 'variable_from_context' is not defined.

What is the right way to call callback with the given globals and locals?

Code example:

der_callback = None

def save_callback(cb):
    der_callback = cb

_locals = {}
_globals = {'save_callback': save_callback}

text = r'''
zoo = ['we']

def foo():
    print(zoo[0])

save_callback(foo)
'''

exec(text, _globals, _locals)
print(_locals)

# One can also try this:
# exec(_locals['foo'].__code__, _globals, _locals)

# EDIT: Now, why doesn't _locals get used when invoking a function?
# This works:
# exec('print(zoo[0])', _globals, _locals)

# EDIT continues: This doesn't:
# exec('foo()', _globals, _locals)

_locals['foo']()

Output:

Traceback (most recent call last):
{'zoo': ['we'], 'foo': <function foo at 0x1020b2d90>}
  File "/Users/me/pyzoo/callback_from_eval.py", line 22, in <module>
    exec(_locals['foo'].__code__, _globals, _locals)
  File "<string>", line 5, in foo
NameError: name 'zoo' is not defined
  • Can you please post a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example that reproduces this problem? – PM 2Ring Apr 7 '17 at 2:19
  • Added, also fixed a mistake: changed eval() to exec(). – Victor Sergienko Apr 7 '17 at 2:30
  • Are you familiar with decorators? I believe it would be a better resource to use here, both from a usability standpoint and from a maintenance standpoint. – Mikael Apr 7 '17 at 2:39
  • @Mikael To a certain degree. To use instead of what, it's a bit unclear? – Victor Sergienko Apr 7 '17 at 2:41
  • 1
    @VictorSergienko just to be general, Python allows direct building of AST trees and executing them; it's more cumbersome than providing code to be parsing, but suggests a path without exec(). – Netch Apr 8 '17 at 7:32
2

First, any context has its globals and locals. On a module level, they are equivalent (the same dictionary). In other contexts, they generally differ. Unless you declare something as global, any assignment modifies the context locals, but not globals.

Then, any function has its own locals. As result, when entering foo, _globals is seen as globals, but _locals is not seen as locals. So, zoo is not visible. The direct fix is to say global zoo before its assignment in the chunk.

Also, you expose the same issue in save_callback: assignment to der_callback does not change globals, but a local variable that is immediately lost after exit. To fix, declare der_callback as global inside the function.

UPD: if you need chunk-top locals, you can try one of the following tricks:

T1. On chunk global level, assign a name to locals() and reuse it in foo():

globals()['xl'] = locals()
zoo = ['we']

def foo():
    print(xl['zoo'][0])

T2. Use call stack frames lookup:

Outside of chunk:

def save_callback(cb):
    global der_callback
    der_callback = lambda: cb(sys._getframe(1).f_locals)

In foo definition:

def foo(xl):
    print(xl['zoo'][0])
  • Indeed, thanks, making all globals helps, though it's not pretty. Do you have any insights on why doesn't exec(_locals['foo'].__code__, _globals, _locals) work? Plus, can I avoid globals? Locals are supposed to inherit the enclosing locals, can I do it for a callable? – Victor Sergienko Apr 7 '17 at 6:51
  • Locals really do not inherit the enclosing locals or enclosed ones. In a function body, locals are the same space on all nesting levels. – Netch Apr 8 '17 at 7:02
  • Wait, in the example, if I change save_callback(foo) to just foo(), foo() will have access to zoo. zoo is in _locals. Apparently, foo() gets it from enclosing locals. Why doesn't passing _locals to exec() have the same effect? (I suspect __code__ implementation specifics, but it could also be my lack of understanding). – Victor Sergienko Apr 8 '17 at 7:22
  • @VictorSergienko no, with such update, foo body gets zoo from globals. You can verify it with direct check like globals().get('zoo') and locals().get('zoo'). – Netch Apr 8 '17 at 7:35
  • 1
    I think now I get it. _locals are used in a local context in exec(), but not in an enclosing context for a function invocation. The latter is supposed to be captured when the function is declared. Why isn't it there is a subject for another question. Thanks! – Victor Sergienko Apr 10 '17 at 18:56
1

As Netch has said, your

def save_callback(cb):
    der_callback = cb

does not assign to the global der_callback. It binds the cb object to the local name der_callback, and of course that binding is lost when the function exits. To assign to a global object from inside a function you must use the global directive.

Perhaps this code will help you to understand what's going on.

der_callback = None

def save_callback(cb):
    global der_callback 
    der_callback = cb

def show_dict(d, name):
    print(name)
    for k in sorted(d.keys()):
        if not k[0] == '_':
            print('{!r}: {!r}'.format(k, d[k]))
    print()

text = r'''
zoo = ['we']

def foo():
    print(zoo[0])

save_callback(foo)

show_dict(globals(), 'text GLOBALS')
'''

_globals = {
    'save_callback': save_callback,
    'show_dict': show_dict,
}
exec(text, _globals)

zoo = ['hello']

show_dict(globals(), 'module GLOBALS')

print(der_callback)
der_callback()

output

text GLOBALS
'foo': <function foo at 0xb71d5cd4>
'save_callback': <function save_callback at 0xb725553c>
'show_dict': <function show_dict at 0xb71d5c8c>
'zoo': ['we']

module GLOBALS
'der_callback': <function foo at 0xb71d5cd4>
'save_callback': <function save_callback at 0xb725553c>
'show_dict': <function show_dict at 0xb71d5c8c>
'text': "\nzoo = ['we']\n\ndef foo():\n    print(zoo[0])\n\nsave_callback(foo)\n\nshow_dict(globals(), 'text GLOBALS')\n"
'zoo': ['hello']

<function foo at 0xb71d5cd4>
we

In both contexts locals() is the same as globals(), which you can see by passing locals() to show_dict.


Here's a slightly modified version of your code, I think it does what you want.

der_callback = None

def save_callback(cb):
    der_callback = cb

_globals = {'save_callback': save_callback}

text = r'''
zoo = ['we']

def foo():
    print(zoo[0])

save_callback(foo)
'''

exec(text, _globals)
_globals['foo']()

output

we

That exec call is equivalent to

exec(text, _globals, None)
  • I don't see how can you not reproduce the error on 3.6.0. I get it for both foo() invocation variants on 3.6.0 (v3.6.0:41df79263a11, Dec 22 2016, 17:23:13) and 2.7.10 (default, Feb 6 2017, 23:53:20) on OS X. What output do you get on an unmodified MCVE? – Victor Sergienko Apr 7 '17 at 16:09
  • So one half of the answer is that globals is already set. Do you see how to set locals as a, for example, enclosing locals? One may think that exec() will do that, and why it doesn't? – Victor Sergienko Apr 7 '17 at 17:36
  • @victor I'm not sure what you're asking. Do you mean like exec(text, _globals, locals())? – PM 2Ring Apr 8 '17 at 0:42
  • I mean that context consists of globals and locals. The answer has dealt with globals. I have got _locals out of exec(). Now it would be nice to pass them as an enclosing locals to the next eval() or another way of invoking the callback. – Victor Sergienko Apr 8 '17 at 3:36
  • @VictorSergienko Sorry for the delay. I was on my phone last time I replied, and didn't get a chance to run any code. I also apologize for saying that I couldn't reproduce your error, I don't know what I did differently last time, maybe it was because I added a global directive to save_callback. Anyway, I've added some more code to my answer. – PM 2Ring Apr 9 '17 at 14:11

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