139

I am using vuex and vuejs 2 together.

I am new to vuex, I want to watch a store variable change.

I want to add the watch function in my vue component

This is what I have so far:

import Vue from 'vue';
import {
  MY_STATE,
} from './../../mutation-types';

export default {
  [MY_STATE](state, token) {
    state.my_state = token;
  },
};

I want to know if there are any changes in the my_state

How do I watch store.my_state in my vuejs component?

  • use a Vuejs plugin which comes with chrome it will come handy – AKASH PANDEY Jan 18 '19 at 5:18

14 Answers 14

151

Let's say, for example, that you have a basket of fruits, and each time you add or remove a fruit from the basket, you want to (1) display info about fruit count, but you also (2) want to be notified of the count of the fruits in some fancy fashion...

fruit-count-component.vue

<template>
  <!-- We meet our first objective (1) by simply -->
  <!-- binding to the count property. -->
  <p>Fruits: {{ count }}</p>
</template>

<script>
import basket from '../resources/fruit-basket'

export default () {
  computed: {
    count () {
      return basket.state.fruits.length
      // Or return basket.getters.fruitsCount
      // (depends on your design decisions).
    }
  },
  watch: {
    count (newCount, oldCount) {
      // Our fancy notification (2).
      console.log(`We have ${newCount} fruits now, yaay!`)
    }
  }
}
</script>

Please note, that the name of the function in the watch object, must match the name of the function in the computed object. In the example above the name is count.

New and old values of a watched property will be passed into watch callback (the count function) as parameters.

The basket store could look like this:

fruit-basket.js

import Vue from 'vue'
import Vuex from 'vuex'

Vue.use(Vuex)

const basket = new Vuex.Store({
  state: {
    fruits: []
  },
  getters: {
    fruitsCount (state) {
      return state.fruits.length
    }
  }
  // Obvously you would need some mutations and actions,
  // but to make example cleaner I'll skip this part.
})

export default basket

You can read more in the following resources:

  • I am just wondering what shoul I do when the watch action should split into two steps: 1) First, checking if the the desire data is cached and if it does just return the cached data; 2) If the cache failed I need an async ajax action to fetch the data, but this seems to be the action's work. Hoping my question make sense, thank you! – 1Cr18Ni9 Aug 6 '19 at 10:17
62

You should not use component's watchers to listen to state change. I recommend you to use getters functions and then map them inside your component.

import { mapGetters } from 'vuex'

export default {
  computed: {
    ...mapGetters({
      myState: 'getMyState'
    })
  }
}

In your store:

const getters = {
  getMyState: state => state.my_state
}

You should be able to listen to any changes made to your store by using this.myState in your component.

https://vuex.vuejs.org/en/getters.html#the-mapgetters-helper

  • 1
    I don't know how to implement mapGetters. Can you point me to an example. It would be a big help. I just implement GONG answer at the moment. TY – Rbex May 15 '17 at 6:27
  • 1
    @Rbex "mapGetters" is part of 'vuex' library. You don't need to implement it. – Gabriel Robert May 16 '17 at 15:07
  • 56
    This answer is just wrong. He actually needs to watch the computed properties. – Juan May 23 '18 at 1:09
  • 11
    The getter once called will only retrieve the state at that time. If you want that property to reflect the state change from another component you have to watch it. – C Tierney Jun 2 '18 at 12:23
  • 2
    Why "You should not use component's watchers to listen to state change"? Here is example you might not think of, if I want to watch on token from the state, and when it change to redirect to another page. so, there is some cases you need to do that. maybe you need more experience to know that. – Shlomi Levi Sep 29 '18 at 16:28
37

As mentioned above it is not good idea to watch changes directly in store

But in some very rare cases it may be useful for someone, so i will leave this answer. For others cases, please see @gabriel-robert answer

You can do this through state.$watch. Add this in your created (or where u need this to be executed) method in component

this.$store.watch(
    function (state) {
        return state.my_state;
    },
    function () {
        //do something on data change
    },
    {
        deep: true //add this if u need to watch object properties change etc.
    }
);

More details: https://vuex.vuejs.org/api/#watch

  • 3
    I don't think it's a good idea to watch state directly. We should use getters. vuex.vuejs.org/en/getters.html#the-mapgetters-helper – Gabriel Robert Apr 8 '17 at 12:51
  • 14
    @GabrielRobert I think there's a place for both. If you need to reactively change template conditions based, using a computed value with mapState, etc makes sense. But otherwise, like for even flow control in a component, you need a full watch. You are right, you should not use plain component watchers, but the state.$watch is designed for these use cases – roberto tomás Aug 31 '17 at 20:10
  • 13
    Everyone mentions it, but no one says why! I'm trying to build a vuex store that's auto-synchronised with a DB upon changes. I feel watchers on the store is the most frictionless way! What do you think? Still not a good idea? – mesqueeb Jun 21 '18 at 2:12
15

It's as simple as:

watch: {
  '$store.state.drawer': function() {
    console.log(this.$store.state.drawer)
  }
}
  • 3
    This is a damn sight more straightforward than any of the answers here... is there any argument against doing this..? – Inigo Nov 12 '19 at 11:57
  • 6
    It's too simple so doesn't look like js, js must be more complicated. – digout Nov 28 '19 at 9:37
14

I think the asker wants to use watch with Vuex.

this.$store.watch(
      (state)=>{
        return this.$store.getters.your_getter
      },
      (val)=>{
       //something changed do something

      },
      {
        deep:true
      }
      );
10

This is for all the people that cannot solve their problem with getters and actually really need a watcher, e.g. to talk to non-vue third party stuff (see Vue Watchers on when to use watchers).

Vue component's watchers and computed values both also work on computed values. So it's no different with vuex:

import { mapState } from 'vuex';

export default {
    computed: {
        ...mapState(['somestate']),
        someComputedLocalState() {
            // is triggered whenever the store state changes
            return this.somestate + ' works too';
        }
    },
    watch: {
        somestate(val, oldVal) {
            // is triggered whenever the store state changes
            console.log('do stuff', val, oldVal);
        }
    }
}

if it's only about combining local and global state, the mapState's doc also provides an example:

computed: {
    ...mapState({
        // to access local state with `this`, a normal function must be used
        countPlusLocalState (state) {
          return state.count + this.localCount
        }
    }
})
  • nice hack, but just too tedious, don't you think? – Martian2049 Feb 27 '18 at 21:01
  • 2
    It is not a hack if it's in the docs, is it? But then, it's not a pro-argument for vue/vuex either – dube Mar 1 '18 at 8:35
5

Create a Local state of your store variable by watching and setting on value changes. Such that the local variable changes for form-input v-model does not directly mutate the store variable.

data() {
  return {
    localState: null
  };
 },
 computed: {
  ...mapGetters({
    computedGlobalStateVariable: 'state/globalStateVariable'
  })
 },
 watch: {
  computedGlobalStateVariable: 'setLocalState'
 },
 methods: {
  setLocalState(value) {
   this.localState = Object.assign({}, value);
  }
 }
4

The best way to watch store changes is to use mapGetters as Gabriel said. But there is a case when you can't do it through mapGetters e.g. you want to get something from store using parameter:

getters: {
  getTodoById: (state, getters) => (id) => {
    return state.todos.find(todo => todo.id === id)
  }
}

in that case you can't use mapGetters. You may try to do something like this instead:

computed: {
    todoById() {
        return this.$store.getters.getTodoById(this.id)
    }
}

But unfortunately todoById will be updated only if this.id is changed

If you want you component update in such case use this.$store.watch solution provided by Gong. Or handle your component consciously and update this.id when you need to update todoById.

  • thank you. That's exactly my use case, and indeed the getter cannot be watched then ... – pscheit Oct 2 '18 at 4:47
2

You can use a combination of Vuex actions, getters, computed properties and watchers to listen to changes on a Vuex state value.

HTML Code:

<div id="app" :style='style'>
  <input v-model='computedColor' type="text" placeholder='Background Color'>
</div>

JavaScript Code:

'use strict'

Vue.use(Vuex)

const { mapGetters, mapActions, Store } = Vuex

new Vue({
    el: '#app',
  store: new Store({
    state: {
      color: 'red'
    },
    getters: {
      color({color}) {
        return color
      }
    },
    mutations: {
      setColor(state, payload) {
        state.color = payload
      }
    },
    actions: {
      setColor({commit}, payload) {
        commit('setColor', payload)
      }
    }
  }),
  methods: {
    ...mapGetters([
        'color'
    ]),
    ...mapActions([
        'setColor'
    ])
  },
  computed: {
    computedColor: {
        set(value) {
        this.setColor(value)
      },
      get() {
        return this.color()
      }
    },
    style() {
        return `background-color: ${this.computedColor};`
    }
  },
  watch: {
    computedColor() {
        console.log(`Watcher in use @${new Date().getTime()}`)
    }
  }
})

See JSFiddle demo.

2

When you want to watch on state level, it can be done this way:

let App = new Vue({
    //...
    store,
    watch: {
        '$store.state.myState': function (newVal) {
            console.log(newVal);
            store.dispatch('handleMyStateChange');
        }
    },
    //...
});
  • It's not good idea to handle store.state change by dispatch state action from component as this behaviour only work if you use that component. Also you might ended with infinite loop. Watch to store.state change rarely use, for example if you have a component or a page that should do some action based on store.state changed that could not handled by using computed mapState only where you cannot compare newValue vs oldValue – Januartha Aug 31 '18 at 22:24
  • @Januartha what is your suggestion to this problem then? – Billal Begueradj Sep 4 '18 at 14:43
  • @Andy yes of course its work. I just want to note why you call store.dispatch? if you want to handle store.state change for store' why not handle it inside store.mutations` ? – Januartha Sep 4 '18 at 15:50
  • @BillalBEGUERADJ I prever dube solution is more cleaner – Januartha Sep 4 '18 at 15:54
  • @Januartha, because there might be an ajax call to happen before doing a mutation, that's why i use store.dispatch first. For example, i want to get all the cities from a country whenever $store.state.country changes, so i add this to the watcher. Then i would write an ajax call: in store.dispatch('fetchCities') i write: axios.get('cities',{params:{country: state.country }}).then(response => store.commit('receiveCities',response) ) – Andy Sep 24 '18 at 10:29
1

You could also subscribe to the store mutations:

store.subscribe((mutation, state) => {
  console.log(mutation.type)
  console.log(mutation.payload)
})

https://vuex.vuejs.org/api/#subscribe

  • You can fire this in the beforeMount() hook of your component then filter the incoming mutations with an if Statement. e.g if( mutation.type == "names/SET_NAMES") {... do something } – Alejandro Feb 4 '19 at 18:53
1

if you use typescript then you can :

import { Watch } from "vue-property-decorator";

..

@Watch("$store.state.something")
private watchSomething() {
   // use this.$store.state.something for access
   ...
}

  • Why exactly was this downvoted? Just because the solution is for vue-class-component and the TO was asking for old vue-class styles? I find the former preferable. Maybe @Zhang Sol could mention in the introduction, that this is explicitly for vue-class-component? – JackLeEmmerdeur Sep 16 '19 at 22:16
1

If you simply want to watch a state property and then act within the competent accordingly to the changes of that property then see the example below.

In store.js:

export const state = () => ({
 isClosed: false
})
export const mutations = {
 closeWindow(state, payload) {
  state.isClosed = payload
 }
}

In this scenario, I am creating a boolean state property that I am going to change in different places in the application like so:

this.$store.commit('closeWindow', true)

Now, if I need to watch that state property in some other component and then change the local property I would write the following in the mounted hook:

mounted() {
 this.$store.watch(
  state => state.isClosed,
  (value) => {
   if (value) { this.localProperty = 'edit' }
  }
 )
}

Firstly, I am setting a watcher on the state property and then in the callback function I use the value of that property to change the localProperty.

I hope it helps!

0

You can also use mapState in your vue component to direct getting state from store.

In your component:

computed: mapState([
  'my_state'
])

Where my_state is a variable from the store.

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