3

I'm writing THUMB code for an embedded core (ARM7TDMI) that needs to be linked to existing THUMB code. I'm using the GNU ARM embedded toolchain (link). I cannot get the linker to treat the existing external code as THUMB; it seems to always think that it's ARM. The existing code that I'm linking to is absolutely static and cannot be changed/recompiled (it's a plain binary sitting on a ROM chip, basically).

Here is an example program, multiply.c, that demonstrates the issue:

extern int externalFunction(int x);
int multiply(int x, int y)
{
    return externalFunction(x * y);
}

Compiled using:

arm-none-eabi-gcc -o multiply.o -c -O3 multiply.c -march=armv4t -mtune=arm7tdmi -mthumb
arm-none-eabi-ld -o linked.o multiply.o -T symbols.txt

Where symbols.txt is a simple linker script:

SECTIONS
{
    .text 0x8000000 : { *(.text) }
}
externalFunction = 0x8002000;

When I objdump -d linked.o, I get:

08000000 <multiply>:
 8000000:       b510            push    {r4, lr}
 8000002:       4348            muls    r0, r1
 8000004:       f000 f804       bl      8000010 <__externalFunction_from_thumb>
 8000008:       bc10            pop     {r4}
 800000a:       bc02            pop     {r1}
 800000c:       4708            bx      r1
 800000e:       46c0            nop                     ; (mov r8, r8)

08000010 <__externalFunction_from_thumb>:
 8000010:       4778            bx      pc
 8000012:       46c0            nop                     ; (mov r8, r8)
 8000014:       ea0007f9        b       8002000 <externalFunction>

Instead of branching directly to 0x8002000, it branches to a stub that switches to ARM mode first and then branches to 0x8002000 in ARM mode. I want that BL to branch directly to 0x8002000 and stay in THUMB mode, so that I'd get this instead:

08000000 <multiply>:
 8000000:       b510            push    {r4, lr}
 8000002:       4348            muls    r0, r1
 8000004:       ???? ????       bl      8002000 <__externalFunction>
 8000008:       bc10            pop     {r4}
 800000a:       bc02            pop     {r1}
 800000c:       4708            bx      r1

ABI and calling convention issues aside, how do I achieve this?

  • The obvious thing to try would be externalFunction = 0x8002001;. – Ross Ridge Apr 7 '17 at 6:18
  • I get the same output as before using 0x8002001: it actually gets assembled with the bit cleared. It seems very committed to making sure it's an ARM call... – Jeff E Apr 7 '17 at 6:49
  • 1
    There seems to be a reported bug about this, sourceware.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=15302, but unfortunately the fix for it only applies to Thumb only targets which you don't appear to be using. If you don't mind a non-linker script solution, you could do: static int (* const externalFunction)(int x) = (int (*)(int)) 0x80002001; – Ross Ridge Apr 7 '17 at 7:05
1

one way to do it is make it do what you want

branchto.s

.thumb
.thumb_func
.globl branchto
branchto:
    bx r0

so.c

extern unsigned int externalFunction;
extern int branchto ( unsigned int, int );
int fun ( int x )
{
    return(branchto(externalFunction,x)+3);
}

so.ld

SECTIONS
{
    .text 0x8000000 : { *(.text) }
}
externalFunction = 0x8002001;

producing

08000000 <fun>:
 8000000:   4b04        ldr r3, [pc, #16]   ; (8000014 <fun+0x14>)
 8000002:   b510        push    {r4, lr}
 8000004:   0001        movs    r1, r0
 8000006:   6818        ldr r0, [r3, #0]
 8000008:   f000 f806   bl  8000018 <branchto>
 800000c:   3003        adds    r0, #3
 800000e:   bc10        pop {r4}
 8000010:   bc02        pop {r1}
 8000012:   4708        bx  r1
 8000014:   08002001    stmdaeq r0, {r0, sp}

08000018 <branchto>:
 8000018:   4700        bx  r0

Ross Ridge's solution in the comments works

static int (* const externalFunction)(int x) = (int (*)(int)) 0x80002001;
int fun ( int x )
{
    return((* externalFunction)(x)+3);
}

but the hardcoded address is in the code not the linker script if that matters, was trying to solve that and couldnt.

08000000 <fun>:
 8000000:   b510        push    {r4, lr}
 8000002:   4b03        ldr r3, [pc, #12]   ; (8000010 <fun+0x10>)
 8000004:   f000 f806   bl  8000014 <fun+0x14>
 8000008:   3003        adds    r0, #3
 800000a:   bc10        pop {r4}
 800000c:   bc02        pop {r1}
 800000e:   4708        bx  r1
 8000010:   80002001    andhi   r2, r0, r1
 8000014:   4718        bx  r3
 8000016:   46c0        nop         ; (mov r8, r8)

I prefer the assembly solution for something like this to force the exact instruction I want. Naturally if you had linked in the external function it would/should have just worked (there are some exceptions but gnu is getting really good at resolving the to and from arm/thumb for you in the linker).

I dont see it as a gnu bug actually, but instead they need a way in the linker script to declare that variable as a thumb function address rather than just some generic linker defined variable (likewise as an arm function address). Just like .thumb_func does (or a longer function/procedure declaration)

.word branchto

.thumb
.globl branchto
branchto:
    bx r0

 8000018:   0800001c    stmdaeq r0, {r2, r3, r4}

0800001c <branchto>:
 800001c:   4700        bx  r0


.word branchto

.thumb
.thumb_func
.globl branchto
branchto:
    bx r0

 8000018:   0800001d    stmdaeq r0, {r0, r2, r3, r4}

0800001c <branchto>:
 800001c:   4700        bx  r0

by just reading the gnu linker documentation there may be hope to get what you want

SECTIONS
{
    .text0 0x08000000 : { so.o }
    .text1 0x08002000 (NOLOAD) : { ex.o }
}

ex.o comming from a dummy function to make everyone happy

int externalFunction ( int x )
{
    return(x);
}

08000000 <fun>:
 8000000:   b510        push    {r4, lr}
 8000002:   f001 fffd   bl  8002000 <externalFunction>
 8000006:   3003        adds    r0, #3
 8000008:   bc10        pop {r4}
 800000a:   bc02        pop {r1}
 800000c:   4708        bx  r1

and the NOLOAD keeps the dummy function out of the binary.

arm-none-eabi-objcopy so.elf -O srec --srec-forceS3 so.srec

S00A0000736F2E7372656338
S3150800000010B501F0FDFF033010BC02BC0847C0461E
S315080000104743433A2028474E552920362E322E305C
S31508000020004129000000616561626900011F000046
S3150800003000053454000602080109011204140115CA
S31008000040011703180119011A011E021E
S70500000000FA

note it wasnt perfect there was extra garbage that got pulled in, perhaps symbols

08000000 <fun>:
 8000000:   b510        push    {r4, lr}
 8000002:   f001 fffd   bl  8002000 <externalFunction>
 8000006:   3003        adds    r0, #3
 8000008:   bc10        pop {r4}
 800000a:   bc02        pop {r1}
 800000c:   4708        bx  r1
 800000e:   46c0        nop         ; (mov r8, r8)
 8000010:   3a434347    
 8000014:   4e472820    
 8000018:   36202955    
 800001c:   302e322e    
 8000020:   00294100    
 8000024:   65610000    
 8000028:   00696261    
 800002c:   00001f01    
 8000030:   54340500    
 8000034:   08020600    
 8000038:   12010901    
 800003c:   15011404    
 8000040:   18031701    
 8000044:   1a011901    

which you can see in the srec, but the 0x08002000 code is not there so your actual external function will get called.

I would go with just making the instruction you want or function pointers with an assignment if you dont want any asm.

|improve this answer|||||
0

The other comments/answers using long branches do work, but it would still be nice to have a direct BL call and avoid the unnecessary load.

I believe I've found a workaround here. Create a dummy file (let's call it ext.c) with:

__attribute__((naked)) int externalFunction(int x){}

Compile this file to ext.o (same way as you compile multiply.c). This generates a dummy object file with a correctly decorated function symbol for externalFunction, whose address gets overridden by the linker script, resulting in the desired BL instruction:

Disassembly of section .text:

08000000 <multiply>:
 8000000:       b510            push    {r4, lr}
 8000002:       4348            muls    r0, r1
 8000004:       f001 fffc       bl      8002000 <externalFunction>
 8000008:       bc10            pop     {r4}
 800000a:       bc02            pop     {r1}
 800000c:       4708            bx      r1
 800000e:       46c0            nop                     ; (mov r8, r8)
|improve this answer|||||
  • 1
    Note that if the destination of the BL instruction isn't within +/-16M in your real case the linker will just replace it with a long branch anyways. – Ross Ridge Apr 7 '17 at 18:04

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.