2

This is something that I searched high and low for in the Hibernate docs and surprisingly couldn't find an answer for.

Almost all canonical examples of Hibernate/JPA demonstrate configuring the primary key via the @Id annotation like so:

// Groovy pseudo-code!
@Entity
class Car {
  @Id
  @Column(name = "car_id")
  Long id

  @Column(name = "car_make")
  String make

  @Column(name = "car_model")
  String model
}

But, if I already have a pre-existing database, and if I plan on using Hibernate to merely validate that database instead of create one for me (via hibernate.hbm2ddl.auto = validate), and if my DB table is configured with an auto-incrementing primary key field, then of what value (at the application layer) does @Id provide me? Meaning, given:

  • hibernate.hbm2ddl.auto = validate; and
  • The table/entity has an auto-incrementing PK (such as with MySQL AUTO_INCREMENTING)

...then what does it matter to my application whether my entity class has @Id in it or not? Why couldn't I just write it like:

// Groovy pseudo-code!
@Entity
class Car {
  @Column(name = "car_id")
  Long id

  @Column(name = "car_make")
  String make

  @Column(name = "car_model")
  String model
}

Or does @Id still provide value to my app in some way (if so, how)?

  • 1
    every object has to have an IDENTITY. If you have no @Id then an object has no identity, and consequently is invalid. If the datastore is doing AUTO_INCREMENT then you should have the field marked as @GeneratedValue(strategy=IDENTITY) just like the JPA spec tells you, so then the JPA provider knows it is being attributed in the datastore – Neil Stockton Apr 7 '17 at 12:32
  • Thanks @NeilStockton (+1) a few followup questions if you don't mind: (1) all the Hibernate/JPA docs I've found have verbiage in them that indicates @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.IDENTITY) is for configuring the JPA provider (Hibernate) and declaring how JPA (not the DB) should be generating values. I don't want Hibernate to generate my PK values, I want the DB to. Are you positive that GenerationType.IDENTITY won't conflict with what MySQL is auto-generating? – smeeb Apr 7 '17 at 12:55
  • Also (2) when you say "If you have no @Id then an object has no identity, and consequently is invalid" what do you mean by "invalid"? Will Hibernate throw an exception? Will it cause issues in other places of my code (that's sort of the root of the question). Thanks again! – smeeb Apr 7 '17 at 12:55
  • IDENTITY means the column uses AUTO_INCREMENT/SERIAL/IDENTITY, and so its value is set in the datastore (and consequentially not present in INSERT statements). That is what the JPA spec says. And as for 2, ALL ENTITIES MUST HAVE AN IDENTITY defined, again from the JPA spec – Neil Stockton Apr 7 '17 at 12:57
  • Thanks, running my app right now without @Id and everything seems to be working fine. Think I'll keep it out for now since it seems like its just there to fulfill a spec requirement but doesn't do anything functional when Hibernate is validating and the DB is auto incrementing. – smeeb Apr 7 '17 at 13:42
1

Does JPA @Id provide value if the table is auto-incrementing?

Short answer is no. The annotation @Id just specifies the primary key of an entity. If you want its value to be auto-generated then you have to annotate the field with @GeneratedValue indicating the appropriate GenerationType strategy, i.e.: IDENTITY:

@Entity
class Car {

    @Id
    @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.IDENTITY)
    @Column(name = "car_id")
    Long id

    /...
}

Note that auto-increment or serial types are not supported by all RDBMS, i.e: Oracle does not have auto-increment as a type but you can create and use a sequence instead.

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