403

I was reading about path-mapping in file tsconfig.json, and I wanted to use it to avoid using the following ugly paths:

Enter image description here

The project organization is a bit weird because we have a mono-repository that contains projects and libraries. The projects are grouped by company and by browser / server / universal.

Enter image description here

How can I configure the paths in file tsconfig.json, so instead of:

import { Something } from "../../../../../lib/src/[browser/server/universal]/...";

I can use:

import { Something } from "lib/src/[browser/server/universal]/...";

Will something else be required in the Webpack configuration? Or is the tsconfig.json file enough?

2

20 Answers 20

586

This can be set up on your tsconfig.json file, as it is a TypeScript feature.

You can do like this:

"compilerOptions": {
        "baseUrl": "src", // This must be specified if "paths" is.
         ...
        "paths": {
            "@app/*": ["app/*"],
            "@config/*": ["app/_config/*"],
            "@environment/*": ["environments/*"],
            "@shared/*": ["app/_shared/*"],
            "@helpers/*": ["helpers/*"]
        },
        ...

Have in mind that the path, where you want to refer to, takes your baseUrl as the base of the route you are pointing to and it's mandatory as described on the documentation.

The character '@' is not mandatory.

After you set it up on that way, you can easily use it like this:

import { Yo } from '@config/index';

The only thing you might notice is that the intellisense does not work in the current latest version, so I would suggest to follow an index convention for importing/exporting files.

Reference: Module resolution

18
  • 107
    Just a comment that might help others... if you are working with node.js or some environment that doesn't use a module bundler like webpack you will additionally need the npmjs.com/package/module-alias module Commented Jan 5, 2018 at 14:24
  • 1
    This works completely fine but there is a problem when enable declaration and import this npm module in another module. Intelisense breaks. Any idea on how to fix this issue?
    – Sivasankar
    Commented May 18, 2018 at 14:12
  • 2
    I cannot get this to work. I have a tsconfig.json file, and then inside my src I have a tsconfig.app.json file. I have tried adding these values to both, with and without "*" and slashes. I'm just using angular-cli. Is there anything special that has to be done, like for webpack? Thanks!
    – emery.noel
    Commented Nov 30, 2018 at 21:31
  • 5
    note that jest-test don't use the tsconfig-paths - you need to define a moduleNameMapper: tsjest#414
    – TmTron
    Commented Jan 29, 2019 at 19:37
  • 3
    in order for the paths to work with nodejs you need to pre-load tsconfig-paths/register and ts-node/register/transpile-only. Commented Apr 2, 2021 at 9:53
47

You can use a combination of the baseUrl and paths documentation.

Assuming root is in the topmost src directory (and I read your image properly), use:

// tsconfig.json
{
  "compilerOptions": {
    ...
    "baseUrl": ".",
    "paths": {
      "lib/*": [
        "src/org/global/lib/*"
      ]
    }
  }
}

For Webpack, you might also need to add a module resolution. For Webpack 2, this could look like:

// webpack.config.js
module.exports = {
    resolve: {
        ...
        modules: [
            ...
            './src/org/global'
        ]
    }
}
1
  • 2
    Just noticing @mleko, @alejandro-lora used baseUrl, you talk rootDir ... — what's the difference?
    – Frank N
    Commented Jan 11, 2021 at 10:03
26

Check this similar solutions with asterisk

  "baseUrl": ".",
  "paths": {
    "*": [
      "node_modules/*",
      "src/types/*"
    ]
  },
4
  • 9
    I don't see what he did here. What does this do? Commented Oct 14, 2021 at 11:21
  • @PaulRazvanBerg for all imports (*) try to find them on node_modules and src/types
    – weisk
    Commented Feb 24, 2022 at 17:43
  • But this cannot resolve .css files. Commented Feb 26 at 0:31
  • I would not recommending this way. It simply works as "take an import path and try to resolve with either "node_modules/*" or "src/types/*". Resolution might be failed because of the file is not located none of these two folders.
    – hastrb
    Commented May 5 at 16:30
21

If you are looking for the most minimalist example for referencing your root folder with @, this would be it:

{
  "compilerOptions": {
    "baseUrl": "src",
    "paths": {
      "@/*": ["*"]
    }
  }
}
// Example usage: import * as logUtils from '@/utils/logUtils';

Or if you don't even have a src folder or would like to explicitly include it in the imports, this would also work:

{
  "compilerOptions": {
    "baseUrl": ".",
    "paths": {
      "@/*": ["*"]
    }
  }
}
// Example usage: import * as logUtils from '@/src/utils/logUtils';
1
  • 1
    this breaks imports, like for example I had a axios.ts file and I had import axios from 'axios'; and it was referencing itself and giving me "any" as a result for the type, so I changed the code to "@/*": ["./src/*"] and removed baseUrl
    – genesisxyz
    Commented Oct 2, 2023 at 10:08
18

This works for me:

yarn add --dev tsconfig-paths

ts-node -r tsconfig-paths/register <your-index-file>.ts

This loads all paths in tsconfig.json. A sample tsconfig.json:

{
    "compilerOptions": {
        {…}
        "baseUrl": "./src",
        "paths": {
            "assets/*": [ "assets/*" ],
            "styles/*": [ "styles/*" ]
        }
    },
}

Make sure you have both baseUrl and paths for this to work.

And then you can import like:

import {AlarmIcon} from 'assets/icons'
14

If you are using paths, you will need to change back absolute paths to relative paths for it to work after compiling TypeScript code into plain JavaScript code using tsc.

Most popular solution for this has been tsconfig-paths so far.

I've tried it, but it did not work for me for my complicated setup. Also, it resolves paths in run-time, meaning overhead in terms of your package size and resolve performance.

So, I wrote a solution myself, tscpaths.

I'd say it's better overall because it replaces paths at compile-time. It means there is no runtime dependency or any performance overhead. It's pretty simple to use. You just need to add a line to your build scripts in the package.json file.

The project is pretty young, so there could be some issues if your setup is very complicated. It works flawlessly for my setup, though my setup is fairly complex.

2
  • There is a third way: use Vercel's ncc tool, which compiles your TypeScript project to a single file. Commented Oct 14, 2021 at 11:08
  • Use tsc-alias instead
    – Braden
    Commented Feb 8, 2022 at 2:40
11

If you are using tsconfig-paths and this does not work for you, try tsconfig.json:

{
  // ...
  "compilerOptions": {
    "outDir": "dist",
    "rootDir": "src",
    "baseUrl": ".",
    "paths": {
      "@some-folder/*": ["./src/app/some-folder/*", "./dist/app/some-folder/*"],
      // ...
    }
  },
  // ...
}

If the compiler sees @some-folder/some-class, it is trying to find it in ./src... or in ./dist....

8

Alejandro's answer worked for me, but as I'm using the awesome-typescript-loader with Webpack 4, I also had to add the tsconfig-paths-webpack-plugin to my webpack.config file for it to resolve correctly.

7

It’s kind of a relative path. Instead of the below code

import { Something } from "../../../../../lib/src/[browser/server/universal]/...";

We can avoid the "../../../../../". It’s looking odd and is not readable either.

So the TypeScript configuration file have answer for the same. Just specify the baseUrl, config will take care of your relative path.

Way to configuew: In the tsconfig.json file, add the below properties.

"baseUrl": "src",
    "paths": {
      "@app/*": [ "app/*" ],
      "@env/*": [ "environments/*" ]
    }

So finally it will look like below:

import { Something } from "@app/src/[browser/server/universal]/...";

It looks simple, awesome and more readable...

0
6

Use:

{
  "compilerOptions": {
    "baseUrl": "src"
  },
  "include": ["src"]
}

I'm not sure if we must define the paths. But after write baseUrl to src. I can import all folders under the src folder like this:

import { Home } from "pages";
import { formatDate } from "utils";
import { Navbar } from "components";

Don't forget to restart your terminal after change the tsconfig.json.

4

If TypeScript + Webpack 2 + at-loader is being used, there is an additional step (mleko's solution was only partially working for me):

// tsconfig.json
{
  "compilerOptions": {
    ...
    "rootDir": ".",
    "paths": {
      "lib/*": [
        "src/org/global/lib/*"
      ]
    }
  }
}

// webpack.config.js
const { TsConfigPathsPlugin } = require('awesome-typescript-loader');

resolve: {
    plugins: [
        new TsConfigPathsPlugin(/* { tsconfig, compiler } */)
    ]
}

Advanced path resolution in TypeScript 2.0

1
  • Please don't use TsConfigPathsPlugin. It's not well-maintained. There are many open issues regarding webpack v5. Commented Feb 25 at 18:39
4

You can do this with just Node.js by using Subpath patterns.

For example, adding this to your package.json...

{
    "imports": {
        "#lib": "./build/path/to/lib",
        "#lib/*": "./build/path/to/lib/*",
    }
}

will let you import like so, avoiding relative paths.

import { something } from "#lib"

Note that they must start with a hash, and in package.json, they must point to your build so Node can recognize it.

Like others have said, you can add something like this to your tsconfig.json for TypeScript:

{
    "compilerOptions": {
        "baseUrl": ".",
        "paths": {
            "#lib": ["./src/path/to/lib"],
            "#lib/*": ["./src/path/to/lib/*"],
        },
    },
}
3

It looks like there has been an update to React that doesn't allow you to set the "paths" in the tsconfig.json file any longer.

Nicely, React just outputs a warning:

The following changes are being made to your tsconfig.json file: \

  • compilerOptions.paths must not be set (aliased imports are not supported)

then updates your tsconfig.json and removes the entire "paths" section for you. There is a way to get around this run

npm run eject

This will eject all of the create-react-scripts settings by adding config and scripts directories and build/configuration files into your project. This also allows a lot more control over how everything is built, named, etc. by updating the {project}/config/* files.

Then update your tsconfig.json file:

{
    "compilerOptions": {
        "baseUrl": "./src",
        {…}
        "paths": {
            "assets/*": [ "assets/*" ],
            "styles/*": [ "styles/*" ]
        }
    },
}
1
  • Another workaround for this would be to inherit those values from another file. In your tsconfig, place this param and path to the base file ``` { ... "extends": "./tsconfig.base.json", ... } ``` Then in the tsconfig.base.json you can place your paths config ``` { "compilerOptions": { "paths": { "": [""] } } } ``` The error will still show, but it wont delete your settings anymore. There's more info on why this is happening here github.com/facebook/create-react-app/issues/… Commented Jan 24, 2022 at 23:44
3

For a component library

If you are working on a library that returns UI components (like react-bootstrap or Ant Design) then this should work for you.

"compilerOptions": {
        ....
        "rootDir": "src",
        "baseUrl": ".",
        "paths": {
            "src/*": ["src/*"],
            "components/*": ["src/components/*"],
        }
  },
1
  • Why emphasize the rootDir here? Commented Feb 25 at 18:38
2

Check out the compiler operation using this.

I have added baseUrl in the file for a project like below:

"baseUrl": "src"

It is working fine. So add your base directory for your project.

2

Solution for 2021.

Note: CRA. Initially the idea of ​​using a third party library or ejecting app for alias seemed crazy to me. However, after 8 hours of searching (and trying variant with eject), it turned out that this option is the least painful.

Step 1.

yarn add --dev react-app-rewired react-app-rewire-alias

Step 2. Create config-overrides.js file in your project's root and fill it with:

const {alias} = require('react-app-rewire-alias')

module.exports = function override(config) {
  return alias({
    assets: './src/assets',
    '@components': './src/components',
  })(config)
}

Step 3. Fix your package.json file:

  "scripts": {
-   "start": "react-scripts start",
+   "start": "react-app-rewired start",
-   "build": "react-scripts build",
+   "build": "react-app-rewired build",
-   "test": "react-scripts test",
+   "test": "react-app-rewired test",
    "eject": "react-scripts eject"
}

If @declarations don't work, add them to the d.ts file. For example: '@constants': './src/constants', => add in react-app-env.d.ts declare module '@constants';

That is all. Now you can continue to use yarn or npm start/build/test commands as usual.

Full version in documentation.

Note: The Using with TypeScript / JavaScript configuration part in docs did not work for me. The error "aliased imports are not supported" when building the project remained. So I used an easier way. Luckily it works.

2
  • 2
    react-app-rewired package is lightly maintained so you shouldn't continue with this package you should use craco instead Commented Jun 16, 2021 at 6:57
  • 2
    I tried installing craco today and noticed there were around 20 out of date dependencies, some with critical vulnerabilities. Commented Dec 28, 2021 at 5:31
1

/ starts from the root only. To get the relative path, we should use ./ or ../.

1
0

baseUrl being correct is important.

import Home from '@app/features/Home';

src/features/Home.tsx

  "compilerOptions": {
    "baseUrl": "./",
    "paths": {
      "@app/*": [
        "src/*"
      ],
    },
0

Make sure you have:

{
    "compileOnSave": true,
    "compilerOptions": {
        "paths": {
            "@styles/*": ["assets/scss/*"]
        }
    },
}

That was causing me issues.

0

For me, Visual Studio Code was not recognizing the path, but the project was building just fine. The issue was that I had the paths declaration in a second tsconfig.app.json file.

Moving the paths property from tsconfig.app.json into tsconfig.json fixed the issue.


Supposedly, this is because Visual Studio Code only checks the first tsconfig.json file found in the root directory of the project, although I haven't confirmed that for myself. Perhaps someone can provide a comment with more information.

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