0

I'm using the Vue.js library Vuetify to add a few text field components inside on a component that I create. In order to provide input validation I would like to capture the hasError property of the text field components. I know the path of the property is: this.$children[3]._computedWatchers.hasError.active. But I would like to know if there is another way to access theses properties. Maybe I'm missing something?

 <template>
  <div class="register">
    <form>
      <div>
        <v-text-field name="new-user-email"
                      label="Email"
                      type="email"
                      single-line
                      required></v-text-field>
      </div>
      <div>
        <v-text-field name="user-user-password"
                      label="Password"
                      type="password"
                      single-line
                      required>
        </v-text-field>
      </div>
      <div>
        <v-text-field name="new-user-password-confirmation"
                      label="Confirm Password"
                      type="password"
                      single-line
                      required>
        </v-text-field>
      </div>
      <div @click="registerNewUser">
        <v-btn>Register</v-btn>
      </div>
    </form>
  </div>
</template>

<script>
export default {
  name: 'register-new-user',
  data() {
    return {
      checked: false
    };
  },
  methods: {
    registerNewUser() {
      console.log(this.$children[3]._computedWatchers.hasError.active)
      console.log('Register a new user')
    }
  }
};
</script>
2

Add a ref attribute to the v-text-field component like this:

<v-text-field 
  ref="password-confirmation"
  name="new-user-password-confirmation"
  label="Confirm Password"
  type="password"
  single-line
  required
></v-text-field>

Then you can reference the VueComponent instance of the Vuetify text field component (along with its properties and methods) like so:

methods: {
  registerNewUser() {
    console.log(this.$refs['password-confirmation'].hasError)
  }
}

Here's documentation on refs.

  • Excellent, that was exactly what I was looking for. Thanks a lot. – James Apr 7 '17 at 17:08
  • For some reason using ...hasError.active produce an undefined error. hasError just works. – James Apr 7 '17 at 17:22
  • 1
    Yeah it would just be the property name. I updated the answer – thanksd Apr 7 '17 at 17:25

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