1

Suppose we have trained a neural network. My question is will that same neural network generate the data back if we apply what previously was the output as in present as the input?

I was working on the MNIST dataset and wondered what will happen if we train​ our network from the output side(using the final output as the input from that side itself) using Backpropagation algorithm.

My thinking says that it can get the data back (or approximations to the original dataset). Can it be justified?

4
  • 2+3=5. 5 = 0+5; 1+4; 2+3. For some math background check out bijective functions and the pigeonhole-principle. For some reading about doing different but similar stuff look for some paper called Deep Neural Networks are Easily Fooled.
    – sascha
    Apr 7, 2017 at 20:16
  • @ sascha What if the inverse for the given function used exists...
    – Aditya
    Apr 10, 2017 at 14:04
  • Check the inner-workings of your NN-architecture and decide yourself. As these are multiple layers, the bijective-nature get's lost in all but theory-only cases.
    – sascha
    Apr 10, 2017 at 14:06
  • @sascha yep it's true..
    – Aditya
    Apr 10, 2017 at 15:05

1 Answer 1

1

As far as I know. It can't. Especially because activation functions are (mostly) non-linear.

A neural network is a black box (see this answer). Second of all, take f(x) = x^2. If you want to compute n from f(n), then there are two possible solutions; the same works for neural networks, there can be multiple solutions, so it's impossible to inverse all of them. But the main point being: just because you know the inverse of a function, doesn't mean you know the inverse of a neural-network. It's a black-box!

However, you can visualise what response a neuron gives with a certain input. For example, this are the 'aspects' a neural network looks for to recognize a face:

enter image description here

Google Deepdream also amplifies the aspects it's looking for to recognize certain objects. Check it out!

1
  • 1
    @ADITYA what if? nothing. There are two reasons why; first of all, a neural network is a black box (see this question why stats.stackexchange.com/a/93713/147931). Second of all, take f(x) = x^2. If you want to compute n from f(n), then there are two possible solutions; the same works for neural networks, there can be multiple solutions, so it's impossible to inverse all of them. But the main point being: just because you know the inverse of a function, doesn't mean you know the inverse of a neural-network. It's a black-box! Apr 10, 2017 at 15:40

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.