I must generate a random number using boost libraries, I use this code:

boost::mt19937 gen;
boost::uniform_int<> dist(kUIMinManPort, kUIMaxManPort);
boost::variate_generator< boost::mt19937&, boost::uniform_int<> >
var(gen, dist);
unsigned int value = (unsigned int)var();
return boost::lexical_cast<std::string>(value);

Obviously I import all necessary libraries. Well the code compiles but the problem is that I obtain the same numbers....

OK OK... do not worry, I am not such a newbie when talking about casual (or better pseudo-casual) number generation. I know that we must provide a seed and that, depending on this seed, a sequence of pseudocasual numbers will be provided.

So my code becomes this:

boost::mt19937 gen(static_cast<unsigned int>(std::time(0)));
boost::uniform_int<> dist(kUIMinManPort, kUIMaxManPort);
boost::variate_generator< boost::mt19937&, boost::uniform_int<> >
var(gen, dist);
unsigned int value = (unsigned int)var();
return boost::lexical_cast<std::string>(value);

Well, the problem is that we get almost the same number everytime I call this function (inside a for cycle). I suspect that the time depending seed provided to the generation core of the boost random library does not vary during the period of time of a for cycle, that's why get almost the same number everytime I run a cycle and get a random number... The question is: how to solve this problem in an efficient way??? I suppose a best practice is given... Well, I'm not the only one having such a problem :)

Thanks...

  • After some experience, I'd say to not use boost::random for eg. generating normal deviates, but I never had any problems with their mersenne twister. – Alexandre C. Dec 1 '10 at 21:25
  • 1
    Ah, and using time(0) as a seed implies that you'll not run the program multiple times within one second. I usually use something like time(0) + (long long)getpid() << 32 on unix. There is an equivalent on windows. – Alexandre C. Dec 1 '10 at 21:27
  • boost::random_device (aka std::random_device in C++0x) is a nicer source of seeds than std::time(). But it still shouldn't be called on every iteration of a loop. – Cubbi Dec 1 '10 at 21:40
  • You should seed only once. – Matt Dec 1 '10 at 21:52
up vote 4 down vote accepted
static boost::mt19937 gen(static_cast<unsigned int>(std::time(0)));

The static makes sure that the generator is only created once. The problem is that time isn't changing fast enough. If you call your function in the same millisecond, you'll get the exact same results. Unfortunately, your code is just that fast that you're calling it in the same millisecond.

Making the generator static (or a singleton pattern, or a global variable...) will solve the issue.

  • 1
    actually time(0) changes only every second ! – Alexandre C. Dec 1 '10 at 21:28
  • What do you mean by "Making the generator static (or a singleton pattern, or a global variable...)"? – Andry Dec 1 '10 at 21:29
  • 2
    Or just initialize gen outside of the loop ... – Benjamin Bannier Dec 1 '10 at 21:30
  • It means exactly what I said. The easiest way is to just say "static boost::mt19937 gen(static_cast<unsigned int>(std::time(0))); ". Add "static" to the variable declaration. – Dragontamer5788 Dec 1 '10 at 21:34
  • @Dragontamer5788 Well yes you're right, but this happens n a method of a class, tomaintain my object I should not create another instance of the gen but put it static as a class member and use it in the function right? or when using static in instantiation, every other time the function is called, the variable will not be created again??? I hope I was clear... – Andry Dec 1 '10 at 22:42

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