If have an 8-byte section of data and write a double-precision floating-point value to it, under what conditions will comparison by numerical comparison and lexicographic sorting of the bytes agree?

Current theory: positive, big-endian

I believe that if the number is positive, and the representation is big-endian, then numerical ordering of the floating-point values will match the lexicographic ordering of the bytes.

The idea is that it would first sort on the exponent, then on the mantissa. Even the "denormalized" IEEE representation shouldn't cause any problems.

Is this true?

(I'm using Node's Buffer::writeDoubleBE, but that shouldn't matter.)

Follow-up

I think a simple modification can extend this to negative numbers: XOR all positive numbers with 0x8000... and negative numbers with 0xffff.... This should flip the sign bit on both (so negative numbers go first), and then reverse the ordering on negative numbers. Does anyone see a problem with this?

  • Though not C++, java Math has nextUp and similar functions for extensive unit tests. – Joop Eggen Apr 8 '17 at 19:40
  • @JoopEggen I was hoping for a universal "no" or "provably yes". When it comes to bit-level stuff, running tests on a couple of consumer machines I have to hand doesn't give me enough confidence. I was hoping someone with slightly lower-level experience than me could say "yes this will work on all architectures, given XYZ". – cloudfeet Apr 8 '17 at 22:34
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your approach:

I think a simple modification can extend this to negative numbers: XOR all positive numbers with 0x8000... and negative numbers with 0xffff.... This should flip the sign bit on both (so negative numbers go first), and then reverse the ordering on negative numbers. Does anyone see a problem with this?

is definitely the answer. Moreover, it was used, for example, in dBase and clones to organize sorting on a float column, and I guess it's followed by newer DB generations.

Also, it is identical to the "total order" according to IEEE-754 for binary representations. (But not for decimal ones, the latter is much more complex.)

UPDATE: as suggested by @Sneftel: you could find replacing -0 with +0 as useful before converting to bit string.

  • The one actually meaningful issue: This will cause -0 to compare less than +0. The probably-not-important issue: NaNs will not be correctly "unordered". – Sneftel Apr 9 '17 at 20:20
  • @Sneftel according to public drafts of IEEE754-2008, all this is according to totalOrder predicate: -0 is less than +0; order for NaNs are exactly just with this comparison. Seems that totalOrder was intentionally defined to be trivially implemented with this method. If you care only for -0/+0, this case can be reflected separately (e.g. replace -0 with +0 before converting). – Netch Apr 10 '17 at 4:10
  • Yes, I was referring to the OP's desire for numerical comparison. – Sneftel Apr 10 '17 at 6:52

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