2

I am trying to have a string that toggle between two values. I have declared as ternary

public position: string = (this.position == "positionOne" ? "positionOne" : "positionTwo");

What I would like to have a function for directly toggle from "positionOne" to "positionTwo" (value of the string). Something like `

togglePosition = function() 
     {this.position = !this.position}

and then it takes the opposite string as value. Or I need to do the complete evaluation also if declared as ternary? and then see if (position = "positionOne")... do whatever.. or else the upside down. You know what I mean? :) What solution you suggest to me?

Thanks a lot from now

  • 2
    do you really mean javascript? or java? if javascript, why do you use a typed variable? – Nina Scholz Apr 8 '17 at 19:15
  • 1
    @NinaScholz it's typescript – vol7ron Apr 8 '17 at 19:19
  • 3
    Your ternary operation is fine, except that you should swap the final two values, otherwise you don't change anything. – trincot Apr 8 '17 at 19:20
5

You could use an object and the keys as the wanted value.

function toggle(v) {
    return { positionOne: 'positionTwo', positionTwo: 'positionOne' }[v];
}
 
var position = 'positionOne';
console.log(position);
position = toggle(position);
console.log(position);
position = toggle(position);
console.log(position);

  • You hit the nail, great. It is what I was looking for. So usefull. With your permise I pick this snippet with me. – Sam Apr 8 '17 at 19:25
  • 1
    you can use it. you may have a look here for a extended use of the same style. – Nina Scholz Apr 8 '17 at 19:29
2

As an alternative you could use this (in cases where the values do not match "half-way"):

function toggle(pos) {
    return 'positionOnepositionTwo'.replace(pos, '');
}

pos = 'positionOne';
console.log(pos = toggle(pos));
console.log(pos = toggle(pos));
console.log(pos = toggle(pos));

Alternative with find

function toggle(pos) {
    return ['positionOne','positionTwo'].find(x => x !== pos);
}

pos = 'positionOne';
console.log(pos = toggle(pos));
console.log(pos = toggle(pos));
console.log(pos = toggle(pos));

  • if you're going to be poaching one other person's solution, you might as well be aggregating everyone's into one answer ;) – vol7ron Apr 8 '17 at 19:35
  • You are jumping to conclusions. – trincot Apr 8 '17 at 19:37
  • Possibly, I don't care that you did, just saying, it might as well be the aggregating all the answers if that's the route you're going. Regarding the jumping of conclusions, the coincidences were that you were able to post a solution, then had enough time to edit/update your post with another better solution, during the new post time period (before the update was captured as an edit). Seeing how long it takes to add one answer and then adding another so quickly is quite a coincidence. – vol7ron Apr 8 '17 at 19:45
  • You seem a little agitated. When I say you are jumping to conclusions, I refer to "poaching one other person's solution". Although I understand you may interpret it that way, I posted this solution without being aware that you were having the same idea. It is not unusual that different people come up with the same idea at about the same time. – trincot Apr 8 '17 at 19:49
  • I knew what you meant when you said, jumping to conclusions; I also knew what you meant when I answered with possibly. But nah, I'm not agitated. How I seem is only how you perceive me, which if I already admitted I don't care, can only mean your perception needs some calibration ;) And yes, answered plenty of questions on here to know two people can come up with the same idea, which is why I also know it's a bloody big coincidence if I see you have a solution using slow string manipulation, then shortly after I post a method using array iteration, you update your solution. – vol7ron Apr 8 '17 at 19:59
2

I think that the 'correct way' will depend on the person and project. For simple problems i prefer the ternary way or the answer by @Nina Scholz.

You can also use ES6 destructuring:

({ [position]: position } = { positionOne: "positionTwo", positionTwo: "positionOne" });

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>

<body>

  <button onclick="myFunction()">Click me</button>

  <p id="demo"></p>

  <script>
    var position = "positionOne";

    function myFunction() {
      ({
        [position]: position
      } = {
        positionOne: "positionTwo",
        positionTwo: "positionOne"
      });
      document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = position;
    }
  </script>

</body>

</html>

An interesting alternative using destructuring, although probably not the best for this use case, can be obtained by toggling the values of two variables:

var positionA = "positionOne";
var positionB = "positionTwo";
[positionA, positionB] = [positionB, positionA];

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>

<body>

  <button onclick="myFunction()">Click me</button>

  <p id="demo"></p>

  <script>
    var positionA = "positionOne";
    var positionB = "positionTwo";

    function myFunction() {
      [positionA, positionB] = [positionB, positionA];
      document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = positionA;
    }
  </script>

</body>

</html>

Or just use an object:

var position = {a: 'positionOne', b: 'positionTwo'};    
[position.a, position.b] = [position.b, position.a];

The advantage of this solution is that enable one to change between multiple values and not just two (However for this you should probably use the solution mentioned earlier in its extensive form).

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>

<body>

  <button onclick="myFunction()">Click me</button>

  <p id="demo"></p>

  <script>
    var positionA = "positionOne";
    var positionB = "positionTwo";
    var positionC = "positionThree";
    var positionD = "positionFour";

    function myFunction() {
      [positionA, positionB, positionC, positionD] = [positionB, positionC, positionD, positionA];
      document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = positionA;
    }
  </script>

</body>

</html>

1

It might make more sense to store the state of which string to display in a boolean variable, which you can easily toggle, then write a method that returns the appropriate string based on the boolean variable.

  • Usefull comment with yours and other answers I have now it much more clear. Thank you. – Sam Apr 8 '17 at 19:26
1

Of course, you could use Array.find to do the same thing Nina mentioned:

var log = console.log;
function toggle(v) {
   return ['positionOne','positionTwo'].find(s=>s!=v);
}
 
var position = 'positionOne';
log( position );

position = toggle(position);
log( position );

position = toggle(position);
log( position );

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