3

given two arrays:

import numpy as np
L1 = np.array([3, 1, 4, 2, 3, 1])
L2 = np.array([4, 8, 9, 5, 6, 7])

I want to efficiently find the longest consecutive gap that exists.

For example, let i be the ith index of both arrays.

    i = 0:  elements = (3,4) -> gap in range 3-4 -> longest path = 1
    i = 1: elements = (1,8)  -> 3-4 intersect 1-8 is 3-4 -> longest path = 2
    i = 2: elements = (4, 9) -> 3-4 intersect 4-9 is NULL -> longest path = 2

    ##this is what slows my approach down
    #now, we must return to i = 1

    i = 1: elements = (1,8) -> candidate interval is 1-8 -> path = 1, longest path = 2
    i = 2: elements = (4,9) -> 1-8 intersect 4-9 is 4-8 -> path = 2, longest path = 2
    i = 3: element = (2,5) -> 4-8 intersect 2-5 is 4-5 -> path = 3, longest path = 3
    ...

If you try to visualize it, it's a bit like that flappy bird game, and so what I'm trying to find is the longest time the bird can remain at the same level without dying

I want a way to not track back, so that I only go through each i one time. Any suggestions? preferably in python

update

I wrote some code to visualise the problem (note I assumed here that the maximum number of rows is 10, this isn't always the case:

def get_flappy_matrix(ceiling, floor):
    '''
    given ceiling and floor heights
    returns matrix of 1s and 0s
    representing the tunnel
    '''
    ceil_heights = np.array(ceiling)
    floor_heights = np.array(floor)
    nmb_cols = len(ceil_heights)
    flappy_m = np.ones(shape=(10, nmb_cols), dtype=np.int)

    for col in range(nmb_cols):
        for row in range(ceil_heights[col], floor_heights[col]):
            flappy_m[row, col] = 0

    return flappy_m

N = 6
L1 = np.array([3, 1, 4, 2, 3, 1])
L2 = np.array([4, 8, 9, 5, 6, 7])


m = get_flappy_matrix(L1, L2)

plt.pcolor(m, cmap=plt.cm.OrRd)
plt.yticks(np.arange(0, 10, 1), range(0, 11))
plt.xticks(np.arange(0, N+1),range(0,N+1))
plt.title(str(max_zero_len))
plt.gca().invert_yaxis()
plt.gca().set_aspect('equal')
plt.show()

Now, from another answer, this is one (still slow for large input) approach to the problem:

max_zero_len = max(sum(1 for z in g if z == 0) for l in m for k, g in itertools.groupby(l))
print(max_zero_len)
 # 5
  • 2
    You're going to have to explain some more. What do you mean by "straight line gap" or "consecutive gap"? Are you trying to find, say, the most walls you can shoot a horizontal shot through, with the two arrays representing lower and upper edges of holes in a series of walls? Or are you doing something completely different? You're making us guess a lot here. – user2357112 supports Monica Apr 9 '17 at 0:05
  • Ah, good, you gave us more detail. – user2357112 supports Monica Apr 9 '17 at 0:06
  • @user2357112 yeah sorry, i knew it was analogous to a game but i couldn't remember the name haha – dimebucker91 Apr 9 '17 at 0:08
  • Sorry, i didn't get your question. Can you explain more or can you give your final desired output with your two arrays ? It would be very helpful. – Chiheb Nexus Apr 9 '17 at 0:39
  • 1
    @ChihebNexus does that last edit help ? – dimebucker91 Apr 9 '17 at 0:42
2

Keep a window of consecutive holes the bird can fly through. Extend it at the right one hole at a time, and remove holes from the left when necessary using the following strategy. When you reach the end, the longest window you managed to construct is the solution.

Track the lowest upper wall in the window, and the lowest upper wall that comes after that wall, and the lowest upper wall that comes after that wall, up to the last upper wall in the window. Do something similar for lower walls. For example, if the window goes from holes 3 to 9 here:

    | | | | | | | | upper wall sections
    | | | | | | |
    |   |   |   |
    |   |   |
    |   |   |
... | ------------- window
    | -------------
    |   |
      | | | |     |
    | | | | |   | | lower wall sections
    2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
    wall numbers

then the upper bound walls are 6, 8, and 9, and the lower bound walls are 4 and 9. (We break ties by picking walls to the right.)

Say we extend the window to the tenth hole, and the tenth hole looks like this:

    | | | | | | | | |upper wall sections
    | | | | | | |   |
    |   |   |   |   |
    |   |   |       |
    |   |   |
... | --------------- window
    | ---------------
    |   |
      | | | |     |
    | | | | |   | | | lower wall sections
    2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
    wall numbers

Upper wall 10 is lower than upper walls 9 and 8, so 9 and 8 are no longer upper bounds. The upper bounds are now 6 and 10, and the lower bounds are now 4, 9, and 10.

On the other hand, if hole 10 looked like this:

    | | | | | | | | | upper wall sections
    | | | | | | |
    |   |   |   |
    |   |   |
    |   |   |       |
... |               |
    |               |
    |   |           |
      | | | |     | |
    | | | | |   | | |
    2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
    wall numbers

Lower wall 10 is higher than the lowest upper bound, so we need to remove walls from the left of the window. We advance the window to start at hole 7, removing everything up to the old lowest upper bound (wall 6), and we find that the next upper bound, wall 8, is high enough to produce a valid window:

    | | | | | | | | | upper wall sections
    | | | | | | |
    |   |   |   |
    |   |   | ------- window
    |   |   |       |
... |               |
    |               |
    |   |           |
      | | | |     | |
    | | | | |   | | |
    2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
    wall numbers

If upper wall 8 had still been too low, we would have advanced the window to start at hole 9, and so on.

  • I don't quite understand what you mean by lowest upper wall? why are the upper bound walls 6, 8, 9 and not 4,6,8? – dimebucker91 Apr 9 '17 at 1:14
  • @dimebucker91: 4 is tied with 6, so 6 wins because it's to the right. 9 is the lowest wall that comes after 8, so it's an upper bound. These are the walls that need to be removed from the window to give the bird room to fly higher. – user2357112 supports Monica Apr 9 '17 at 1:17
  • We break ties this way because removing everything up to wall 4 doesn't let the bird fly any higher, since wall 6 is still in the way. – user2357112 supports Monica Apr 9 '17 at 1:22
  • so in your example, we have the lists (starting from 2nd col): L1 = [2, 5, 2, 5, 2, 3, 1], L2 = [8, 7, 8, 8, 10, 9, 8] I'm still quite confused with the approach, i'll try to write some logic around the lists – dimebucker91 Apr 9 '17 at 1:44
  • when you say keep track of the holes, what is it that you are tracking? a list of tuples? – dimebucker91 Apr 9 '17 at 1:58

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